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Pioneers 0, 1 and 2 (1958)

Pioneers 0, 1 and 2 -  These were the first U. S. spacecraft to attempt to leave Earth orbit. Propelled by the U. S. 's desire to beat the Soviet Union to the moon, each of the three vehicles was designed to go into orbit around the Moon and photograph the Moon's surface. None of the vehicles accomplished its intended mission, although some useful data was returned.

The first vehicle, Pioneer 0, was launched by the USAF on August 17, 1958 and was destroyed 77 seconds after launch when the rocket's first stage exploded. Following this attempt, Pioneer 1 and Pioneer 2 were turned over to United States' newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Pioneer 1 was the first spacecraft launched by NASA. A programming error in the Pioneer 1 launch vehicle upper stage resulted in Pioneer 1 being given insufficient velocity to escape the Earth's gravitational field. Although lunar orbit was not achieved, it did reach an altitude of 113854 km above Earth and provided data on the extent of the Earth's radiation belts. The vehicle re-entered over the Pacific Ocean 2 days later. Pioneer 2 also suffered a launch vehicle failure and re-entered the Earth's atmosphere 6 hours and 52 minutes after launch (it did not return any significant data). Some details of the spacecraft: Paint pattern for thermal control of multi-instrument payload. Spin stabilised. Retro-rocket for lunar orbit insertion. Payload: TV camera. Magnetometer. Micrometeroid impact detector and they had a radiation detector.

 

 

 

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NASA's First Spacecraft Launch

Thor Able-I #130 And Pioneer 1

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  PL-58-46804

11 October 1958

The Thor Able I No. 133 and Pioneer 1 (Lunar Probe #2) is seen lifting off into the night sky from Launch Complex 17 Pad A at the Cape.

The Pioneer 1 mission set a distance record but failed to reach the moon due to the third stage that did not produced sufficient thrust to escape Earth's gravity.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Able-I #129 And Pioneer 2

10  x  8  Colour High Glossy NASA Photograph

November 1958

A fantastic vintage scene on top of the pad at Launch Complex 17B during pre-flight activities and mating of the Pioneer 2 spacecraft to the Thor Able launch vehicle.

Pioneer 2 was launched from the Atlantic Missile Range on November 8, 1958, using a Thor-Able booster, by the Air Force acting as executive agent to NASA. The 86.3-pound instrumented payload was intended as a lunar probe but it did not reach escape velocity as the third stage failed to ignite.

This fine vintage high glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

Pioneer 3 & 4   (1959 - 1959)

Smaller than the previous Pioneers, Pioneer 3 and 4 each carried only a single experiment to detect cosmic radiation. Both vehicles were planned to fly by the moon and return data about the Earth and Moon's radiation environment.

Following the unsuccessful USAF/NASA Pioneer 0, 1, and 2 lunar missions, the U. S. Army and NASA launched two more lunar missions. The launch of Pioneer 3 failed when the launch vehicle first's stage cut-off prematurely. Although Pioneer 3 did not achieve escape velocity, it reached an altitude of 102,332 km and discovered a second radiation belt around Earth.

The launch of Pioneer 4 was successful, and Pioneer 4 was the first American spacecraft to escape Earth's gravitational pull as it passed within 58,983 km of the moon which was about twice the planned flyby altitude. The spacecraft did return data on the Moons radiation environment, although the desire to be the first man-made vehicle to fly past the moon was lost when the Soviet Union's Luna 1 passed by the Moon several weeks before Pioneer 4. The spacecraft was battery powered and used passive thermal control (a paint pattern on the external surface of its Fiberglass structure). The payload included two Geiger counters and a camera trigger mechanism as a test but no camera was carried onboard.

6 December 1958 - Pioneer 3 - Failed to reach moon  but it did provided radiation data. Pioneer III was the third U.S.-IGY intended lunar probe under the direction of NASA with the Army acting as executive agent and was launched from the Atlantic Missile Range by a Juno II rocket. The primary objective, to place the 12.95 pound scientific payload in the vicinity of the moon but it failed. Pioneer III did reached an altitude of approximately 70,000 miles and revealed that the earth's radiation belt comprised at least two distinct bands.

3 March 1959 - Pioneer 4 - The fourth U.S.-IGY lunar probe effort, Pioneer IV was a joint project of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency and Jet Propulsion Laboratory under the direction of NASA and was launched by a Juno II rocket from the Atlantic Missile Range. Intended to impact on the lunar surface, Pioneer IV achieved earth-moon trajectory, passing within 60,200 km of the moon before going into permanent orbit around the sun.

 

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Juno II and Pioneer 3

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy USAF Photograph

USAF No.  PL-58-48751

6 December 1958

A brilliant night scene as the Juno II (Jupiter AM-11 configuration) launch vehicle lifts off from Launch Complex 5 with Pioneer 3 onboard as its payload.

Pioneer 3 was intended to be a  lunar probe under the direction of NASA with the Army acting as executive agent however it failed when the launch vehicle first's stage cut-off prematurely. Although Pioneer 3 did not achieve escape velocity, it reached an altitude of 102,332 km and discovered a second radiation belt around Earth.

This fine vintage USAF glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

Pioneer P 3 Spacecraft  (1959 - 1960)

Pioneer P3's were the least successful of all NASA's lunar spacecrafts as none of them even achieved orbit in the four attempts made using an Atlas-Able Launch Vehicle.

1959 November 26 - Pioneer (P 3) - An intended lunar probe launched from the Atlantic Missile Range by an Atlas-Able booster disintegrated about 45 seconds later when the protective sheath covering the payload detached prematurely.

1960 February 15 - Pioneer (P 31) - The Atlas-Able booster rocket exploded during static firing.

1960 September 25 - Pioneer (P 30) -This attempt to place the spacecraft into lunar orbit failed when one of the upper stages of the Atlas- Able rocket malfunctioned.

1960 December 15 - Pioneer (P 31) - The Atlas-Able booster rocket went out of control and exploded at an altitude of 12,200 miles off Cape Canaveral. This was the final launch attempt in the Pioneer lunar probe program.

 

 

Pioneer 5   (1959 - 1960)

Pioneer 5 was designed to provide the first map of the interplanetary magnetic field. The vehicle functioned for a record 106 days, and communicated with Earth from a record distance of 36.2 million km. It was spin stabilised and had four deployed-fixed solar paddles providing 16 watts of power.

 

 

 

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Pioneer 5 Pre-Flight Checks

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  PL-59-34110

12 July 1959

The Pioneer-5 Spacecraft is seen mated with the dummy third stage on the Thor Able-IV Launch Vehicle at the top of the service gantry at Pad 17A.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Able-IV #219 Shroud Hoisted For Mating

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

12 July 1959

The shroud that will protect the Pioneer-5 Spacecraft until it is released from the dummy third stage is seen being hoisted up at Pad A of Launch Complex 17 at the Cape.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Able-4 No. 219 And Pioneer-5

10  x  8  Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

11 March 1960

The Thor Able-4 stands ready for lift off with Pioneer-5 aboard the Delta configuration at Launch Complex 17A at the Cape. This Thor Delta configuration successfully launched Pioneer-5 on it cosmic journey.

This fine vintage colour NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Able-4 No. 219 Lift Off

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

11 March 1960

The Thor Able-4 is launched with Pioneer-5 aboard the Delta second stage at Launch Complex 17A at the Cape. This Thor Delta configuration successfully launched Pioneer-5 on it cosmic journey.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Able-4 No. 219 Lift Off  #2

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy USAF Photograph

NASA  No.  PL-60-52596

11 March 1960

The Thor Able-4 is launched with Pioneer-5 aboard the Delta second stage at Launch Complex 17A at the Cape. This Thor Delta configuration successfully launched Pioneer-5 on it cosmic journey.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in poor to good condition.

 

 

 

 

PIONEER  6, 7, 8, & 9-E  (1965 - 1969)

Pioneers 6, 7, 8, and 9 were created to make the first detailed, comprehensive measurements of the solar wind, solar magnetic field and cosmic rays. The vehicles acted as the world's first space-based solar weather network, providing practical data on solar storms which impact communications and power on Earth.

These Pioneer satellites were designed to measure large scale magnetic phenomena and particles and fields in interplanetary space. Data from the vehicles were used to better understand stellar processes as well as the structure and flow of the solar wind. A fifth spacecraft, Pioneer E, was lost when it failed to orbit due to a launch vehicle failure. The Pioneer 6-9 program was touted as one of the least expensive of all NASA spacecraft programs in terms of scientific results per dollar spent. As of 1996, Pioneer 6 was NASA's oldest operational satellite, having been in orbit over 30 years. The spacecraft was spin stabilized at ~60 rpm. Body mounted solar cells provided 79 watts. The payload consisted of six instruments, including a Plasma Analyzer and Cosmic Ray Detector.

Pioneer E - Pioneer E was launched on 27 August 1969 by the Thor Delta L 540/D73 Launch Vehicle from Pad A of Launch Complex 17 at the Cape.  The Vehicle destructed 383 seconds after lift off due to first stage hydraulics failure. As it did not achieve orbit it was not renamed Pioneer 10.

 

 

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Pioneer Coverage

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  65-H-1959

1965

A fine chart showing the planned experiment coverage of the Pioneer Spacecrafts.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. It does have small pin holes in the four corners.

 

 

 

 

 

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Pioneer 6 Magnetic Shield Installed

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  65-H-1963

12 December 1965

In TRW's Malibu Test Facility, Pioneer 6 is placed inside twelve 22 foot diameter electric coils which counteract the magnetic field of the Earth.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. It does have 2 very small pin holes in the top corners.

 

 

 

 

 

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Pioneer 6 Telemetry Package

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  65-H-1958

12 December 1965

Closeup view of the onboard telemetry package mounted on the equipment platform of the Pioneer 6 spacecraft. The package consists of the antenna, transmitter, voltage controlled oscillators, mount, battery pack, strain gage and accelerometer amplifiers.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. It does have very small pin holes in the 4 corners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pioneer 6 Communication Dish

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  65-H-1957

12 December 1965

The 150 foot dish at Stanford University will communicate directly with the Stanford Experiment aboard the Pioneer 6 spacecraft. Radio signals will be sent from the big dish to the receiver on the spacecraft. Characteristics of the received signal will be returned in Pioneer Telemetry and by hot line from the Goldstone California Tracking Station to Stanford. There, the signal will be refined and sent again to the spacecraft in a continuous process.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. It does have very small pin holes in the 4 corners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Delta E1462/D40 And Pioneer 7

10 x  8   Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

17 August 1966

Pioneer 7 is launched atop the Thor Delta E D40 from Launch Complex 17A at the Cape at 3:20 GMT 17 August 1966.

This fine vintage NASA colour glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pioneer 9 Spacecraft Check Out And Mating

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  102-KSC-68-11572

23 October 1968

The Pioneer D (9) spacecraft is seen being mated with the Delta E Launch Vehicle at Launch Comples 17B at the Cape. The mating operation involves a full check out of the spacecraft to insure all systems are in perfect order before it is launched into space.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

PIONEER  10 & 11

Pioneers 10 and 11 were the first spacecraft to fly by Jupiter and Saturn. Pioneer 11 was the first spacecraft to fly by Saturn and take photographs. Instruments aboard the two craft studied Jupiter and Saturn's atmospheres, magnetic fields, moons, and rings, as well as the interplanetary magnetic and dust particle environment, the solar wind, and cosmic rays. Following their planetary encounters, the vehicles continued on escape trajectories from the solar system. Both spacecraft carry a plaque with a drawing depicting a man, woman, and the location of the sun and earth in the galaxy as greetings to any extraterrestrial who may find the vehicles.

Two separate communications systems were maintained in each spacecraft. The first was omnidirectional and had medium-gain antennas which operated together while connected to one receiver and the second was via a high-gain antenna which was connected to another separate receiver. These receivers could be interchanged by command to provide a backup if one or the other failed. Each system had a radio transmitters, coupled to a travelling-wave tube amplifier which produced 8 W at 2292 MHz each. Uplink was accomplished at 2110 MHz, while data transmission downlink was at 2292 MHz. The data was received by NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) at bit rates up to 2048 bps en route to Jupiter and at 16 bps near end of the mission.

Fifteen experiments were carried to study the interplanetary and planetary magnetic fields; solar wind parameters; cosmic rays; transition region of the heliosphere; neutral hydrogen abundance; distribution, size, mass, flux, and velocity of dust particles; Jovian aurora; Jovian radio waves; atmosphere of Jupiter and some of its satellites, particularly Io; and to photograph Jupiter and its satellites. Instruments carried for these experiments were magnetometer, plasma analyzer, charged particle detector, ionizing detector, non-imaging telescopes with overlapping fields of view to detect sunlight reflected from passing meteoroids, sealed pressurized cells of argon and nitrogen gas for measuring the penetration of meteoroids, UV photometer, IR radiometer, and an imaging photopolarimeter, which produced photographs and measured polarization. Further scientific information was obtained from the tracking and occultation data. Pioneer 11 also carried a low-sensitivity fluxgate magnetometer.

 

 

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Pioneer 10 And 11 Plaque

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  72-H-190

25 February 1972

See complete description below.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

Pioneer  10 & 11 Plaque Description

The Pioneer 10 & 11 spacecraft, destined to be the first man made objects to escape from the solar system into interstellar space, carries this pictorial plaque. It is designed to show scientifically educated inhabitants of some other star system, who might intercept it millions of years from now, when Pioneer was launched, from where, and by what kind of beings. (With the hope that they would not invade Earth.) The design is etched into a 6 inch by 9 inch gold-anodized aluminium plate, attached to the spacecraft's antenna support struts in a position to help shield it from erosion by interstellar dust. The radiating lines at left represents the positions of 14 pulsars, a cosmic source of radio energy, arranged to indicate our sun as the home star of our civilization. The "1-" symbols at the ends of the lines are binary numbers that represent the frequencies of these pulsars at the time of launch of Pioneer F relative of that to the hydrogen atom shown at the upper left with a "1" unity symbol. The hydrogen atom is thus used as a "universal clock," and the regular decrease in the frequencies of the pulsars will enable another civilization to determine the time that has elapsed since Pioneer F was launched. The hydrogen is also used as a "universal yardstick" for sizing the human figures and outline of the spacecraft shown on the right. The hydrogen wavelength, about 8 inches, multiplied by the binary number representing "8" shown next to the woman gives her height, 64 inches. The figures represent the type of creature that created Pioneer. The man's hand is raised in a gesture of good will. Across the bottom are the planets, ranging outward from the Sun, with the spacecraft trajectory arching away from Earth, passing Mars, and swinging by Jupiter.

 

 

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Pioneer 10 During Checkout

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  72-H-190

February 1972

Pioneer F Spacecraft during a checkout with a mock-up of the launch vehicles third stage at the Cape.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tracking Antenna for Pioneer 10 & 11

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  73-H-233

10 April 1973

The largest space tracking antenna erected in Australia for NASA will be officially opened by the Prime Minister, Mr. E. G. Whitlam and NASA Administrator Dr. James C. Flectcher, at the Tidbinbilla Deep Space Communication Complex, near Canberra, on April 13, 1973.

The new 64-meter-diameter antenna will be part of a global network of three similar station designed to support NASA's deep-space research program.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

Pioneer  10 Photographs Of Jupiter

 Very detailed information is given on the back of each of the below NASA Photographs.

Pioneer 10 was launched from the Cape onboard a Atlas Centaur SLV-3 C on March 3, 1972.

Pioneer 10 made its Jupiter flyby in December 1973 and was the first man-made object to leave solar system. The spacecraft achieved its closest approach to Jupiter on December 3, 1973, when it reached approximately 2.8 Jovian radii (about 200,000 km). As of Jan. 1, 1997 Pioneer 10 was at about 67 AU from the Sun near the ecliptic plane and heading outward from the Sun at 2.6 AU/year and downstream through the heliomagnetosphere towards the tail region and into interstellar space.

The Last transmission received from Pioneer 10 was on 22 January 2003 - The signal received was very faint and no telemetry was received. NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) did not detect a signal during the final contact attempt that was made on 7 February 2003. The last time a Pioneer 10 contact returned telemetry data was 27 April 2002 and NASA had no additional contact attempts planned for Pioneer 10. Pioneer 10 was at 82 AU, or 12.3 billion km from Earth when last contact was made. The last signal took 11 hours and 20 minutes to reach earth. The spacecraft was headed in the direction of the star Aldebaran, 68 light-years away. It would reach the vicinity of the red giant star in about two million years.

 

 

 

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Pioneer 10 Colour View Of Jupiter

10 x  8   Colour NASA Photograph

NASA No.   101-KSC-73PC-743

1 December 1973

Jupiter's Red Spot and a shadow of the Moon Io, plus Jupiter's cloud structure are shown in this photograph taken at 11:02 p.m. PST on December 1, 1973 as Pioneer 10 was about 2,500,000 kilometers (1,580,00 miles) from the giant planet.

This fine vintage NASA colour photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pioneer 10 View Of Jupiter

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  74-H-255  or  A73-9189

1 December 1973

Jupiter's shadow of the Moon Io, plus Jupiter's cloud structure are shown in this photograph taken on December 1, 1973 as Pioneer 10 was about 2,600,000 kilometers (1,615,00 miles) from the giant planet.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Pioneer 10 Crescent View Of Jupiter

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.   74-H-677

December 1973

This view is unique to Pioneer as Jupiter is never seen as a crescent from Earth. The bright equatorial nucleus that Pioneer 10 discovered can be seen in this wonderful photograph.

This view of the giant planet is from 1,158,000 miles looking back as the spacecraft leaves Jupiter.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pioneer 10 Crescent View Of Jupiter #2

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.   74-H-679

December 1973

This view is unique to Pioneer as Jupiter is never seen as a crescent from Earth. Jupiter's dark belts and bright zones are visible, as is the 25,000 mile long Great Red Spot in the Southern Hemisphere.

This view of the giant planet is from 2,410,000 miles looking back as the spacecraft leaves Jupiter.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Pioneer 10 Terminator View Of Jupiter

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  73-H-1152  or  A73-9131

26 November 1973

The terminator, the line between Jupiter's sunlit and dark hemispheres, is shown for the first time in this picture taken Monday 26 Nov. 1976 with Pioneer 10's Imaging Photopolarimeter. Earth based telescopes can not capture the terminator due to their limited phase angles.

This image was taken by Pioneer 10 some 5 million miles from the giant planet.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pioneer 10 View Of Jupiter #3

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  74-H-252  or  A73-9191

December 1973

This view of Jupiter gives good details of the planet's cloud tops. Missed scan lines at the lower part of the photo show some of the difficulties that the computer processing of Pioneer 10 pictures still has to overcome. These gaps are being filled in from the original data records being made available from the Deep Space Network receiving stations at Goldstone, Madrid and Canberra. Another photo will be processed at a later date that will complete this view.

This view of the giant planet is from 994,000 miles looking back as the spacecraft leaves Jupiter.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.95

Pioneer 10 View Of Jupiter #4

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  74-H-258  or  A73-9193

December 1973

This view of Jupiter's Northern Temperate Regions shows never-before-seen details of the giant planet's cloud tops. According to Dr. Tom Gahrels, University of Arizona, the most notably new feature in this picture of the North Temperate Region of Jupiter, boundaries are remarkably sharp. Apparently there is on Jupiter an appreciable amount of latitudinal (North-South) motion in addition to the predominant longitudinul (East-West) belts and Zones seen on Earth-based photographs.

This view of the giant planet is from 616,000 miles looking back as the spacecraft leaves Jupiter.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.95

Pioneer 10 View Of Jupiter #5

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  74-H-259  or  A73-9191

December 1973

This view of Jupiter's Northern Temperate Regions shows never-before-seen details of the giant planet's cloud tops. According to Dr. Tom Gahrels, University of Arizona, there is a dark, elongated area near the limb and near the southern boundaries of the North Polar Region. This may be an area of deeper than usual penetration, down to lower cloud regions, into the gaseous atmosphere of Jupiter.

This view of the giant planet is from 808,000 miles looking back as the spacecraft leaves Jupiter.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.95

Pioneer 10 View Of Jupiter's Little Red Spot

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  74-H-675  or  A73-9204

December 1973

The Little Red Spot in the North Tropical Zone of Jupiter had been seen by earth-based observers for at least six months prior to the Pioneer 10 observations. But detailed structure is now seen for the first time in this view taken by Pioneer 10.

This view of the giant planet is from 836,000 miles looking back as the spacecraft leaves Jupiter.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pioneer 10 View Of Jupiter In Red Light

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  74-H-244

December 1973

This view of Jupiter in red light shows never-before-seen details of the giant planet's cloud tops. According to Dr. Tom Gahrels, University of Arizona, a sharp nucleus of cloud formations is the Equatorial Zone is noted in this picture as in a previous Pioneer picture. Below and to the right of the nucleus, fine detail is seen in longitudinal striation of clouds in the Equatorial Regions. Presumably these are stretched by jet streams that have relative velocities on the order of 380 kmph.

This view of the giant planet is from 1,173,000 miles looking back as the spacecraft leaves Jupiter.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pioneer 10 View Of Jupiter In Blue Light

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  74-H-245

December 1973

This view of Jupiter in blue light shows details of the giant planet's cloud tops. Missed scan lines at the lower part of the photo show some of the difficulties that the computer processing of Pioneer 10 pictures still has to overcome. These gaps are being filled in from the original data records being made available from the Deep Space Network receiving stations at Goldstone, Madrid and Canberra. Another photo will be processed at a later date that will complete this view.

This view of the giant planet is from 994,000 miles looking back as the spacecraft leaves Jupiter.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Pioneer 10 View Of Jupiter In Blue Light #2

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  74-H-248

December 1973

This view of Jupiter in blue light shows details of the giant planet's cloud tops. the Great Red Spot and the shadow of the orange satellite, Io, are seen in this photo.

This view of the giant planet is from 1,615,000 miles looking back as the spacecraft leaves Jupiter.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Pioneer 10 Heat-Map View Of Jupiter

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  73-H-1177  or  A73-9182

3 December 1973

Photographic 'heat-map' of Jupiter taken by the infrared instrument on Pioneer 10 as it flew past the planet on December3, 1973. The picture shows the distribution of heat over the planet. The infrared instrument found that the lightest (warmest) areas are 15 degrees F warmer than the darkest (coldest) regions, and that Jupiter produces its own heat radiating two and a half times as much heat as it absorbs from the sun.

This picture measured heat while the spacecraft was about 18.6 miles above Jupiter's orange and blue-striped cloud tops and 31 miles below the top of Jupiter's transparent atmosphere which lies above the clouds.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Pioneer 10 Photography Of Jupiter

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  73-H-1150  or  A73-9125

25 November 1973

The Red Spot of Jupiter stands out in the improved picture (right) of the photo on the left after it was enhanced by scientist at the University of a Arizona. The picture, one of the first taken by Pioneer's iImaging Photopolarimeter, was shot November 25, 1973 while the spacecraft was more than 5 million miles from the planet. The raw data is recorded in the rough form and then sent through computers in Tucson, Arizona where the image is rectified and interpolated to reduce distortion and increase sharpness. The enhancement process takes three days to produce black and white images as the tapes are run through the computer separately for each step in the process.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pioneer 10 TV Photo Of Jupiter

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  73-H-1155  or  A73-9144-C

1 December 1973

Pioneer 10, nearing the planet Jupiter at a speed of 24,200 miles per hour made this image on a television monitor at 5:51 p.m. PST on December 1, 1973. This was the 9th photograph released from Pioneer 10's encounter with Jupiter.

The imaging system, because of its construction and method of operation, causes the left picture to appear upside down and the right picture to be upside down and backwards. In each view, the south pole as we know it on Earth is at the top.

The images were made by NASA's Pioneer 10 as it was about 1,700,000 miles from the Solar Systems largest planet.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pioneer 10 Encounter Photo No. 12

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  73-H-1158  or  A73-9162

2 December 1973

Pioneer 10 image of Jupiter received at NASA's Ames Research Centre about 24 hours before the spacecraft was due to fly by Jupiter at an altitude of 81,000 miles on December3, 1973.

Pioneer 10 was about 511,000,000 miles from Earth, 750,000,000 miles from Jupiter, traveling at a speed of 34,000 miles per hour when the image was completely received on Earth.

Pioneer encounter release photo No. 12  -  Image made at 7:03 a.m. PST December 2, 1973.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pioneer 10 Encounter Photo No. 13

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  73-H-1159  or  A73-9163

2 December 1973

Jupiter's moon Ganymade, one of the Galilean satellites, is seen to the upper right in this image of Jupiter made by NASA's Pioneer 10 spacecraft as it neared Jupiter. The method used by the imaging instrument causes Ganymede's elongated shape which will later be rectified to show the satellite in its true round shape.

When this image was made of Jupiter, Pioneer was 900,00 miles from Jupiter, moving towards the planet at a speed of 34,700 miles per hour.

Pioneer encounter release photo No. 13  -  Image made at 10:04 p.m. PST December 2, 1973.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD-

Pioneer 10 Encounter Photo No. 14

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  73-H-1160  or  A73-9165

3 December 1973

Jupiter so completely fills the viewing field of Pioneer 10's imaging instrument that after the scans reached the left centre of this image, the instrument began to sweep back over the next portion of the planet. This causes the 'V' shaped effect seen in the image which was photographed on a TV monitor when the image was completed. At that time, Pioneer 10 was 660,000 miles from Jupiter.

Pioneer encounter release photo No. 14  -  Image made at 2:02 a.m. PST December 3, 1973.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Pioneer 10 Encounter Photo No. 16

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  73-H-1162  or  A73-9173

3 December 1973

The banded cloud tops of Jupiter are seen in this view made by an imaging photopolarimeter on NASA's Pioneer 10 spacecraft about noon on December 3rd, six hours before Pioneer's closest approach to the planet.

This image was made at a distance of 320,000 miles from Jupiter.

Pioneer encounter release photo No. 16  -  Image made at 12:04 p.m. PST December 3, 1973.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.95

Pioneer 10 Encounter Photo No. 17

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  73-H-1163  or  A73-9174-B

3 December 1973

This image, made in blue light, was made by Pioneer 10 during its successful close approach to Jupiter. The bovious distortion in the photo is a function of the speed of the spacecraft, Jupiter's rotation, and the character of the imaging system. It will be rectified and enhanced with special computer techniques. 

The raw data is recorded in the rough form and then sent through computers in Tucson, Arizona where the image is rectified and interpolated to reduce distortion and increase sharpness. The enhancement process takes three days to produce black and white images as the tapes are run through the computer separately for each step in the process.

Pioneer encounter release photo No. 17  -  Image made at 6:36 p.m. PST December 3, 1973.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

Pioneer  11 Photographs Of Jupiter

 Very detailed information is given on the back of each of the below NASA Photographs.

Pioneer 11 was launched from the Cape onboard a Atlas Centaur SLV-3D on April 6, 1973.

Pioneer 11's Jupiter flyby occurred on December 1974 and its Saturn flyby on September 1979 on a Solar system escape trajectory. Pioneer 11 was the second mission to investigate Jupiter and the outer solar system and the first to explore the planet Saturn and its main rings. Pioneer 11, like Pioneer 10, used Jupiter's gravitational field to alter its trajectory radically. It passed close to Saturn and then it followed an escape trajectory from the solar system. During its closest approach on December 4, 1974, Pioneer 11 passed to within 34,000 km of Jupiter's cloud tops. It passed by Saturn on September 1, 1979, at a distance of 21,000 km from Saturn's cloud tops. The spacecraft has operated on a backup transmitter since launch. Instrument power sharing began in February 1985 due to declining RTG power output. Science operations and daily telemetry ceased on September 30, 1995 when the RTG power level was insufficient to operate any experiments. As of the end of 1995 the spacecraft was located at 44.7 AU from the Sun at a nearly asymptotic latitude of 17.4 degrees above the solar equatorial plane and was heading outward at 2.5 AU/year. Routine tracking and project data processing operations were terminated on March 31, 1997 for budget reasons.

 

 

7.95

Pioneer 11 On Its Way To Saturn

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  74-H-1020

November 1974

A wonderful artist concept that depicts the start of Pioneer 11's five-year journey to the ringed planet Saturn after successfully flying by Jupiter at a distance of 26,700 miles on December 3, 1974.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Pioneer 11 View Of Jupiter

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  74-H-1107  or  A74-9150

24 November 1974

Two fantastic view of Jupiter that was received at Earth tracking stations on November 24, 1974 when Pioneer 11 was still six million miles from Jupiter.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pioneer 11 View Of Jupiter #2

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  74-H-1108  or  A74-9172

2 December 1974

Pioneer 11 took this photo of Jupiter at 6:46 a.m. PST on Monday morning December2, 1974 16 hours before it swung around Jupiter. The image, made from a television monitor at NASA's Ames Research Centre, clearly shows Jupiter's brightly banded weather zones.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pioneer 11 Closest Red Spot Photo Ever Taken

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  75-H-288  or  A74-9213

3 December 1974

This view, looking northward toward the equator, is the closest picture of Jupiter's Great Red Spot taken by Pioneer 11 from a distance of 338,000 miles on 3 December 1974. More details of the Great Red Spot and its surrounding region are visible here than have ever been seen before.

A full page of details is given on the back of this photograph.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD-

Pioneer 11 Hurricane View On Jupiter

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  75-H-289

3 December 1974

Pioneer 11 took this photo of Jupiter from a distance of 373,000 miles and it shows for the first time what appears to be a hurricane like storm in Jupiter's north polar region. The picture also give the first detailed view of the break-up of Jupiter's alternating dark belts and bright zones as one goes toward the pole. The picture covers part of Jupiter's north temperate region and its north polar region.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

Pioneer 12 Venus Orbiter

Pioneer 12 was launched from the Cape onboard a Atlas Centaur SLV-3D on May 20, 1978.

Pioneer Venus Orbiter was designed to perform long-term observations of the Venusian atmosphere and surface features. Data from the Orbiter was correlated with data from its sister vehicle (Pioneer Venus Multiprobe and its atmospheric probes) to relate specific local measurements to the general state of the planet and its environment as observed from orbit. Despite their drastically different roles, the Orbiter and Multiprobe were very similar in design. The use of identical systems (including flight hardware, flight software, and ground test equipment) and incorporation of existing designs from previous missions (including OSO and Intelsat) allowed the mission to meet its objectives at minimum cost.

The Pioneer Venus Orbiter was inserted into an elliptical orbit around Venus on December 4, 1978. After entering orbit around Venus in 1978, the spacecraft returned global maps of the planet's clouds, atmosphere and ionosphere, measurements of the atmosphere-solar wind interaction, and radar maps of 93 percent of the planet's surface. Additionally, the vehicle made use of several opportunities to make systematic UV observations of several comets. From Venus orbit insertion to July 1980, periapsis was held between 142 and 253 km (at 17 degrees north latitude) to facilitate radar and ionospheric measurements. The spacecraft was in a 24 hour orbit with an apoapsis of 66,900 km. Thereafter, the periapsis was allowed to rise (to 2290 km at maximum) and then fall, to conserve fuel. In 1991 the Radar Mapper was reactivated to investigate previously inaccessible southern portions of the planet. In May 1992 Pioneer Venus began the final phase of its mission, in which the periapsis was held between 150 and 250 km until the fuel ran out and atmospheric entry destroyed the spacecraft. With a planned primary mission duration of only eight months, the spacecraft remained in operation until October 8, 1992 when it finally burned up in Venus' atmosphere after running out of propellant.

Pioneer 13 Venus Multiprobe

Pioneer 13 was launched from the Cape onboard a Atlas Centaur SLV-3D on August 8, 1978.

The Pioneer Venus Multi-probe consisted of a bus which carried one large and three small atmospheric probes. After release from the carrier vehicle, the probes entered the atmosphere at 41,600 km/hr, followed by the bus. The small probes were each targeted at different parts of the planet and were named accordingly.

The North probe entered the atmosphere at about 60 degrees north latitude on the day side. The night probe entered on the night side. The day probe entered well into the day side, and was the only one of the four probes which continued to send radio signals back after impact, for 67 minutes. The carrier vehicle, not designed for atmospheric re-entry, followed the probes into the Venusian environment and relayed data about the characteristics of the extreme outer atmosphere until it was destroyed by atmospheric heating. Despite their drastically different roles, the Orbiter and Multiprobe were very similar in design. The use of identical systems (including flight hardware, flight software, and ground test equipment) and incorporation of existing designs from previous missions (including OSO and Intelsat) allowed the mission to meet its objectives at minimum cost.

 

 

 

SOLD

Pioneer 12 & 13 Venus Trajectories

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  74-H-599

23 July 1974

This fine diagram shows the orbits of the Earth and Venus and the paths which the two Pioneer Venus spacecrafts will travel on their missions to gather information about the atmosphere of Venus.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For   10.95  

SOLD

Pioneer 12 & 13 Over Venus

10 x  8   Colour NASA Photograph

NASA No.   AC78-0238-1

1978

A fantastic artiest concept of the Pioneer Venus (12) and Multi-probe (13) as they would appear in orbit around Venus. The Pioneer 13 Multi-probe is seen just after it released the 4 probes.

This fine vintage NASA colour photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Pioneer Venus Size Concept

10 x  8   Colour NASA Photograph

NASA No.   AC78-9125-1

1978

A brilliant artiest concept with the surface area of the United States in relation to the surface size of the planet Venus.

This fine vintage NASA colour photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Atlas Centaur SLV-3D AC-51 & Pioneer 13

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.   101-KSC-78P-176

8 August 1978

The Atlas Centaur 51 was successfully launched from the Cape's Launch Complex 36A a 3:33 a.m. to send the Pioneer 13 Spacecraft on its way to Venus with it multi probe payload.

The Pioneer Venus Multiprobe consisted of a bus which carried one large and three small `atmospheric probes. The large probe was released on November 16, 1978 and the three small probes on November 20. All four probes entered the Venus atmosphere on December 9, followed by the bus. The small probes were each targeted at different parts of the planet and were named accordingly.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Pioneer Orbiter Photograph Of Venus

10 x  8   Colour NASA Photograph

NASA No.   AC78-9166

30 March 1980

This is one of 900 photographs taken of Venus by the orbiting Pioneer 12 spacecraft during its first two years in orbit around Venus. The spacecraft makes one orbit per day and it only takes its clouds four days to rotate around the planet.

The numbers printed on the bottom front of the photograph indicate the year, day and time the view was taken. This view was taken at 3:42 p.m. PST on 30 March 1980.

This fine vintage NASA colour photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Pioneer Orbiter Photograph Of Venus #2

10 x  8   Colour NASA Photograph

NASA No.   AC78-9167

21 May 1980

This is one of 900 photographs taken of Venus by the orbiting Pioneer 12 spacecraft during its first two years in orbit around Venus. The spacecraft makes one orbit per day and it only takes its clouds four days to rotate around the planet.

The numbers printed on the bottom front of the photograph indicate the year, day and time the view was taken. This view was taken at 4:19 a.m. PST on 21 May 1980.

This fine vintage NASA colour photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Pioneer Orbiter Photograph Of Venus #3

10 x  8   Colour NASA Photograph

NASA No.   AC78-9169

28 May 1980

This is one of 900 photographs taken of Venus by the orbiting Pioneer 12 spacecraft during its first two years in orbit around Venus. The spacecraft makes one orbit per day and it only takes its clouds four days to rotate around the planet.

The numbers printed on the bottom front of the photograph indicate the year, day and time the view was taken. This view was taken at 6:51 p.m. PST on 28 May 1980.

This fine vintage NASA colour photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Pioneer 12 Surface Temperature Of Venus

10 x  8   Colour NASA Photograph

NASA No.   AC78-9151-2

28 May 1980

False colour thermal images from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter indicates the surface temperatures of the planet Venus. With blue being the coldest, as on Earth the poles is are coldest part of the planet and warmer near the equator.

This fine vintage NASA colour photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  9.95

SOLD

Pioneer 12 Surface Temperature Of Venus

10 x  8   Colour NASA Photograph

NASA No.   AC78-9151-3

28 May 1980

False colour thermal images from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter indicates the surface temperatures of the planet Venus. With blue being the coldest, as on Earth the poles is are coldest part of the planet and warmer near the equator.

This fine vintage NASA colour photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

  SOLD  For  6.95

SOLD

Pioneer 12 Atmosphere Temperature Of Venus

10 x  8   Colour NASA Photograph

NASA No.   AC78-9242-3

28 May 1980

False colour thermal images from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Infrared radiometer giving the temperature map of the planet Venus's Atmosphere.

Complete analysis details are given on the back of the photo.

This fine vintage NASA colour photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  for  6.95  

SOLD

Pioneer 12 Atmosphere Temperature Of Venus #2

10 x  8   Colour NASA Photograph

NASA No.   AC78-9242-4

28 May 1980

False colour thermal images from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Infrared radiometer giving the temperature map of the planet Venus's Atmosphere.

Complete analysis details are given on the back of the photo.

This fine vintage NASA colour photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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