Unmanned Missions

1965  To 1970

Original Vintage NASA Photographs

Last Up Date  12 August 2016

 

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 SOLD  For   11.95  

SOLD

Titan 3-C And Transtage

10 x 8  Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  PL65-65507

18 June 1965

A fantastic view of the successful launch of this Titan 3-C with a dual payload of Transtage 5 & 7. Transtage is a lead balast spacecraft use for R&D flights to test Launch vehicle and Spacecraft in investigations of spaceflight techniques and related technology.

This fine vintage NASA colour glossy photograph is in very good condition. Printed on heavy 'A Kodak Paper'.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click Here To See All 10 Glossy Photographs Of The AC-5  

Special Mini Gallery

 

AC-5 Lift Off   &  After The Explosion

2 - 3 March 1965

The Atlas / Centaur-5  LV-3C

Launch Complex 36A

9 Black & White Vintage Glossy Photographs taken of the Atlas/Centaur-5 LV and Launch Complex 36A after the main stage prematurely cut off causing the vehicle to fall back on the pad and exploded.

 

 

 

 

 

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AC-6 And Surveyor Model

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

11 August 1965

This Atlas Centaur LV-3C launch vehicle successfully launched A dummy Surveyor payload and placed it into a barycentric / translunar orbit.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

The NASA description on the back of this photograph is wrong. It give details of the GT-11 Atlas Agena launch.

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Thor Delta E1 461/D37 And Tiros

10 x 8 Black & White Glossy Photograph

28 February 1966

The Delta 37 stands tall at LC 17B with its black protective shroud cover.  Onboard is Tiros OT2 a Environmental Survey Satellite (weather) that has APT cameras onboard.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Thor Delta E1 461/D37 And Tiros  #2

10 x 8 Black & White Glossy Photograph

28 February 1966

The Delta 37 has its black protective shroud cover removed and she is ready for lift off from Launch Complex 17 Pad B.  Onboard is Tiros OT2 a Environmental Survey Satellite (weather) that has APT cameras onboard.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Atlas Agena D 6703 (AA15) & The OAO-1

10 x  8   Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

8 April 1966

NASA launched its most advanced unmanned spacecraft from Cape Kennedy at 2:35 pm EST atop the modified Atlas Agena Launch Vehicle. The Orbiting Astronomical Observatory is the first in a series of four designed to give astronomers their first sustained look into the Universe from above the obscuring and distorting effects of the Earth's atmosphere.

This very fine vintage NASA colour glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  SOLD  For  12.95

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Atlas Agena D 6703 (AA15) & The OAO-1

10 x  8   Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

8 April 1966

NASA launched its most advanced unmanned spacecraft from Cape Kennedy at 2:35 pm EST atop the modified Atlas Agena Launch Vehicle. The Orbiting Astronomical Observatory is the first in a series of four designed to give astronomers their first sustained look into the Universe from above the obscuring and distorting effects of the Earth's atmosphere.

This very fine vintage NASA colour glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD-

First OAO Model

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  CC-120

10 October 1960

First model of the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO) which NASA plans to launch in late 1963 to lift telescopes above the Earth's atmosphere which obscures many cosmic radiations of interest to astronomers. NASA will negotiate with Gruman Aircraft Engineering Corp. on an approximate $23 million contract to develop and build two flight-model OAO's. The eight sided satellite is 9-1/2 feet high and about 6-1/2 feet in diameter. It will weigh about 3200 pounds including optical instruments mounted in a chamber running through its length.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.95

AC-8 With Model Of Surveyor Spacecraft

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  66-H-441

8 April  1966

The Atlas Centaur LV-3C - AC-8 lifted off first from Launch Complex 36B on April 8, 1966, carrying Surveyor SD-3.  The RL10A-3-3 engines successfully performed a 325 second first burn to put Centaur into a 175 x 344 km x 30.7 km parking orbit.  Sadly, the planned 107 second Centaur second burn failed at the start when the more powerful ullage motors ran out of hydrogen peroxide fuel just before the end of the 25 minute parking orbit coast period.  Had the burn succeeded, SD-3 would have been boosted to a 167 x 380,000 km orbit. 

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

  SOLD  For  9.95

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AC-9 Atlas Centaur 174D & Surveyor SD-4

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  66-H-1389

26 October 1966

The Atlas-Centaur (AC-9) is ready for launch from Complex 36B at the Cape. AC-9 will be the last in a series of test flight to qualify fully NASA's Atlas-Centaur launch vehicle for lunar and planetary missions.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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AC-10 And Surveyor 1

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  66PC-0113

31 May 1966

The Atlas-Centaur 10, carrying the Surveyor 1 spacecraft, lifting off from Pad 36A. The Surveyor 1 mission scouted the lunar surface for future Apollo manned lunar landing sites.

Landed 02 June 1966, 06:17:37 UT
Latitude 2.45 S, Longitude 316.79 E - Flamsteed P

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

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AC-10 And Surveyor A

10 x 8  Colour NASA Photograph

NASA No.  66-H-680

31 May 1966

The Atlas-Centaur 10, carrying the Surveyor-A spacecraft, lifting off from Pad 36A. The Surveyor-A mission scouted the lunar surface for future Apollo manned lunar landing sites.

Landed 02 June 1966, 06:17:37 UT
Latitude 2.45 S, Longitude 316.79 E - Flamsteed P

This fine 1970's vintage colour NASA photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

AC-10 And Surveyor 1   #2

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  101P-KSC-66P-243

31 May 1966

The Atlas-Centaur 10, carrying the Surveyor 1 spacecraft, lifting off from Pad 36A. The Surveyor 1 mission scouted the lunar surface for future Apollo manned lunar landing sites.

Landed 02 June 1966, 06:17:37 UT
Latitude 2.45 S, Longitude 316.79 E - Flamsteed P

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For   4.95

SOLD

Surveyor 1 Mock Up

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

Surveyor 1 Mock Up.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph would be in excelant condition, however someone felt the need to punch two holes in it to put in a ring binder.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Lunar Surface Seen From Surveyor 1

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  SURVEYOR 1-6

2 June 1966

This photo of the lunar surface taken by Surveyor I on 2 June 1966, within a few hours after the spacecraft soft-landed near the moon's equator. A large rock appears at right. A number of small rocks are scattered about a small crater in upper centre of the photo. Bright spots at left of crater are reflections of the sun in the TV camera systems. This 600-scan-line picture was one of 144 TV photos taken by surveyor I during its first day of operation on the Moon.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Lunar Surface Seen From Surveyor 1 #2

10 x 8  Black & White NASA Photograph

NASA No.  66-H-587

2 June 1966

This 600-scan-line picture was one of 144 TV photos taken by surveyor I during its first day of operation on the Moon. In the lower right corner the television target mounted on leg #2 of the spacecraft shows definition capability of the Surveyor's camera. In upper right, the horizon is visible.

This fine vintage NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Lunar Surface Seen From Surveyor 1 #3

10 x 8  Black & White NASA Photograph

NASA No.  66-H-594

2 June 1966

The edge of the horizon can be seen in the extream upper right corner of the Surveyor I picture of the lunar surface. Distance from the spacecraft to the curved horizon is about 4.5 miles. This 600-scan-line picture was one of 144 TV photos taken by surveyor I during its first day of operation on the Moon.

This fine vintage NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

Surveyor (A):  Surveyor 1 soft landed on the moon in the Ocean of Storms and began transmitting the first of more than 11,150 clear, detailed television pictures to Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Deep Space Facility, Goldstone, Calif. The landing sequence began 3,200 kilometres above the moon with the spacecraft travelling at a speed of 9,700 kilometres per hour. The spacecraft was successfully slowed to 5.6 kilometres per hour by the time it reached 4-meter altitude and then free-fell to the surface at 13 kilometres per hour. The landing was so precise that the three footpads touched the surface within 19 milliseconds of each other, and it confirmed that the lunar surface could support the LM. It was the first U.S. attempt to soft land on the moon.

1966 August 22 - Surveyor vernier engine to be fired after landing:  MSC Director Robert R. Gilruth requested of Jet Propulsion Laboratory Director William H. Pickering that JPL fire the Surveyor spacecraft's vernier engine after the Surveyor landed on moon, to give insight into how much erosion could be expected from an LM landing. The LM descent engine was to operate until it was about one nozzle diameter from landing on the lunar surface; after the Surveyor landed, its engine would be about the same distance from the surface. Gilruth told Pickering that LaRC was testing a reaction control engine to establish surface shear pressure forces, surface pressures, and back pressure sources, and offered JPL that data when obtained.

 

 

 

 

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Thor Delta E1 467/D39 And A-IMP

10 x 8 Black & White Glossy Photograph

NASA No. 102P-KSC-66P-297

1 July 1966

The three-stage thrust-augmented Delta rocket was launched at 11:02 EST from Complex 17A at the Cape on 1 July 1966. Atop the launch vehicle was an Explorer Spacecraft (Explorer-33) called Anchored Interplanetary Monitoring Platform (A-IMP) planned for a seventy-two hour flight to the vicinity of the Moon. The A-IMP is the fourth in a series of seven interplanetary explorers planned to study interplanetary space phenomena in the vicinity of the Moon's orbit around the Earth.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Thor Delta E1 467/D39 And A-IMP  #2

10 x 8 Black & White Glossy Photograph

NASA No. 102P-KSC-66P-297

1 July 1966

Close up shot of the above photo.

The three-stage thrust-augmented Delta rocket was launched at 11:02 EST from Complex 17A at the Cape on 1 July 1966. Atop the launch vehicle was an Explorer Spacecraft (Explorer-33) called Anchored Interplanetary Monitoring Platform (A-IMP) planned for a seventy-two hour flight to the vicinity of the Moon. The A-IMP is the fourth in a series of seven interplanetary explorers planned to study interplanetary space phenomena in the vicinity of the Moon's orbit around the Earth.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Atlas Agena D & Lunar Orbiter-A

10 x 8 Black & White Glossy Photograph

9 August 1966

NASA No. 122-KSC-66P-362

The Atlas Agena-D Launch Vehicle stands ready to boost the 850 pound Lunar Orbiter-A spacecraft to the vicinity of the Moon. The first in a series of 5 planned missions.

The Lunar Orbiter series took photos of lunar surface from selenocentric orbit. The lunar orbiter used a film scanning process taken from a classified program and returned high-resolution images of the surface back to Earth. These images were vital to planning of the subsequent Surveyor and Apollo lunar landings.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Atlas Agena D & Lunar Orbiter-A Lift Off

10 x 8 Black & White Glossy Photograph

NASA  No. 122P-KSC-66P-264

10 August 1966

The Atlas Agena-D Launch Vehicle lifts off boosting the 850 pound Lunar Orbiter-A spacecraft to the vicinity of the Moon. The first in a series of 5 planned missions.

The Lunar Orbiter series took photos of lunar surface from selenocentric orbit. The lunar orbiter used a film scanning process taken from a classified program and returned high-resolution images of the surface back to Earth. These images were vital to planning of the subsequent Surveyor and Apollo lunar landings.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in good condition and someone was kind enough to affix a 175th Anniversary of the Bill of Rights stamp with a Cancellation from the Kennedy Space Centre on August 10th.

 

 

1966 October 4 - Lunar Orbiter 1 results:  MSC Director Robert R. Gilruth told Langley Research Centre Director Floyd Thompson, "Lunar Orbiter I has made significant contributions to the Apollo program and to lunar science in general. Details visible for the first time in Orbiter I photographs will certainly add to our knowledge of the lunar surface and improve our confidence in the success of the Apollo landing.

"Screening teams . . . are studying the photographs as they become available at the Lunar Orbiter Project Office, Langley Research Centre. Several promising areas for Apollo landing sites have been studied here in Houston by the screening teams and will be studied in more detail later. This preliminary study has already influenced the selection of sites to be photographed on the next Orbiter mission.

Lunar Orbiter 2

Lunar Orbiter II was launched 6 November 1966 at 6:21 p.m. EST from Launch Complex 13 at Cape Kennedy, to photograph possible landing sites on the moon for the Apollo program. The Atlas-Agena D booster placed the spacecraft in an earth-parking orbit and, after a 14-minute coast, injected it into its 94-hour trajectory toward the moon. A midcourse correction manoeuvre on November 8 increased the velocity from 3,051 to 3,133 kilometres per hour. At that time the spacecraft was 265,485 kilometres from the earth.

The spacecraft executed a de-boost manoeuvre at 3:26 p.m., November 10, while 352,370 kilometres from the earth and 1,260 kilometres from the moon and travelling at a speed of 5,028 kilometres per hour. The manoeuvre permitted the lunar gravitational field to pull the spacecraft into the planned initial orbit around the moon. On November 15, a micrometeoroid hit was detected by one of the 20 thin-walled pressurized sensors.

The spacecraft was transferred into its final close-in orbit around the moon at 5:58 p.m. November 15 and the photo-acquisition phase of Lunar Orbiter II's mission began November 18. Thirteen selected primary potential landing sites and a number of secondary sites were to be photographed. By the morning of November 25, the spacecraft had taken 208 of the 211 photographs planned and pictures of all 13 selected potential landing sites. It also made 205 attitude change manoeuvres and responded to 2,421 commands.

The status report of the Lunar Orbiter II mission as of November 28 indicated that the first phase of the photographic mission was completed when the final photo was taken on the afternoon of November 25. On November 26, the developing web was cut with a hot wire in response to a command from the earth. Failure to achieve the cut would have prevented the final readout of all 211 photos. Readout began immediately after the cut was made. One day early, December 6, the readout terminated when a transmitter failed, and three medium-resolution and two high-resolution photos of primary site 1 were lost. Full low-resolution coverage of the site had been provided, however, and other data continued to be transmitted. Three meteoroid hits had been detected.

 

 

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Moon Seen From Lunar Orbiter-II

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  S-66-68711

November 1966

A fine shot of the lunar surface taken by the Lunar Orbiter 2 spacecraft and transmitted to the Deep Space Network Station at Goldstone, Calif., in November 1966.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Photo Sent From Lunar Orbiter-II

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   66-H-1471

30 November 1966

First close-up photograph of the crater Copernicus taken at 7:05 p.m. EST 23 November 1966 by Lunar Orbiter II's telephoto lens. The Lunar Orbiter was 28.4 miles above the surface of the Moon and about 150 miles due south of the centre of Copernicus when the picture was taken.

The two photographs below this one, 66-H-1470 & S-66-68957, are portions of this photograph that were transmitted from the spacecraft to the Deep Space Network Station at Goldstone, Calif., on 28 November 1966.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Copernicus Seen From Lunar Orbiter-II

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  66-H-1470

30 November 1966

This is a portion of the first close-up photograph of the crater Copernicus, one of the most prominent features on the face of the Moon, taken at 7:05 p.m. EST 23 November 1966 by Lunar Orbiter II's telephoto lens. Looking north from the crater's southern rim, detail of the central part of Copernicus can be seen. Lunar Orbiter was 28.4 miles above the surface of the Moon and about 150 miles due south of the centre of Copernicus when the picture was taken. This photograph was transmitted from the spacecraft to the Deep Space Network Station at Goldstone, Calif., on 28 November 1966.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  9.95  

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Copernicus Seen From Lunar Orbiter-II  #2

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  S-66-68957

30 November 1966

This is a portion of the first close-up photograph of the crater Copernicus, one of the most prominent features on the face of the Moon, taken at 7:05 p.m. EST 23 November 1966 by Lunar Orbiter II's telephoto lens. Looking north from the crater's southern rim, detail of the central part of Copernicus can be seen. Lunar Orbiter was 28.4 miles above the surface of the Moon and about 150 miles due south of the centre of Copernicus when the picture was taken. This photograph was transmitted from the spacecraft to the Deep Space Network Station at Goldstone, Calif., on 28 November 1966.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lunar View From Lunar Orbiter-II

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  66-H-1634 - 14 December 1966

Photo Number: L-66-9892

Taken: 25 November 1966

A wonderful lunar view captured by the Lunar Orbiter II spacecraft. This photo is frame 213 Photo Number L-66-9891 in the series taken during this mission on 25 November 1966. The area seen is about as big as Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island, and shows an array of lunar domes.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lunar View From Lunar Orbiter-II #2

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  66-H-1634 - 14 December 1966

Photo Number: L-66-9891

Taken: 25 November 1966

A wonderful enlargement from frame 213 (above photo) of the view captured by the Lunar Orbiter II spacecraft.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD-

Thor Delta E1462/D40 And Pioneer 7

10 x  8   Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

17 August 1966

Pioneer 7 is launched atop the Thor Delta E D40 from Launch Complex 17A at the Cape at 3:20 GMT 17 August 1966.

This fine vintage NASA colour glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Titan 3C-11 Lift Off

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  PL66-73315/7379090-517

16 June 1966

With its two 120-inch diameter solid motors supplying 2.4 million pounds of thrust, the Air Force Titan III-C booster, carrying seven communication satellites and an experimental gravity gradient satellite, begins a flight of 18,200 nautical miles high into space from the Cape. This was the first in a series designed to establish the first military communication satellite system (IDCSP). This was a successful launch on June 16, 1966 from Launch Complex 41 at the Cape.

IDCSP - Initial Defense Communications Satellite Program spacecraft were launched in the 1960's to provide America's first geosynchronous orbit communications system.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD-

Titan 3C-11 Lift Off  #2

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

16 June 1966

With its two 120-inch diameter solid motors supplying 2.4 million pounds of thrust, the Air Force Titan III-C booster, carrying seven communication satellites and an experimental gravity gradient satellite, begins a flight of 18,200 nautical miles high into space from the Cape. This was the first in a series designed to establish the first military communication satellite system (IDCSP). This was a successful launch on June 16, 1966 from Launch Complex 41 at the Cape.

IDCSP - Initial Defense Communications Satellite Program spacecraft were launched in the 1960's to provide America's first geosynchronous orbit communications system.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD-

Titan 3C-12 Lift Off

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

26 August 1966

The mighty Titan 3C-12 lifts off from Complex 41 with 8 - 45kg IDCSP satellites onboard. Unfortunately the payload fairing broke up 78 seconds after launch and this mission was logged as a failure.

IDCSP - Initial Defense Communications Satellite Program spacecraft were launched in the 1960's to provide America's first geosynchronous orbit communications system.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD-

Titan 3C-12 Clears The Tower

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.  PL-66-75271

26 August 1966

The mighty Titan 3C-12 lifts off from Complex 41 with 8 - 45kg IDCSP satellites onboard. Unfortunately the payload fairing broke up 78 seconds after launch and this mission was logged as a failure.

IDCSP - Initial Defense Communications Satellite Program spacecraft were launched in the 1960's to provide America's first geosynchronous orbit communications system.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

AC-7 And Surveyor 2

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

20 September 1966

This soft lunar landing attempt failed. Surveyor II was launched from Cape Kennedy at 8:32 a.m. EDT. The Atlas-Centaur D AC-7 launch vehicle placed the spacecraft on a nearly perfect lunar intercept trajectory that would have missed the aim point by about 130 kilometres. Following injection, the spacecraft successfully accomplished all required sequences up to the midcourse thrust phase. This phase was not successful because of the failure of one of the three vernier engines to ignite, causing eventual loss of the mission. Contact with the spacecraft was lost at 5:35 a.m. EDT, September 22, and impact on the lunar surface was predicted at 11:18 p.m. on that day.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in good to very good condition. The back of the photo has browned a bit.

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Surveyor III Compartment A

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  67-H-850

20 April 1967

Mosaic of narrow angle pictures taken by Surveyor II shows the glass mirror of compartment A. Some of the white specks on the compartment are foreign material. However the picture shows that the compartment was not significantly contaminated by the spacecraft's multiple landing.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Surveyor III Lunar Terrain View

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  67-H-464

20 April 1967

Fine detail of lunar terrain some 2.5 meters from Surveyor III is seen in this 600-line, narrow-angle photo taken 20 April 1967 by the spacecraft's TV camera. Protuberance producing the long shadow across lower centre of picture is about 5 centimetres across. Irregularities and rough appearance of the surface is exaggerated by the low sun angle.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Surveyor III Lunar Terrain View  #2

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  67-H-465

20 April 1967

Preliminary evaluation indicates that Surveyor III landed inside a crater. This photo is a view looking north across the interior of the crater. surface floor appears to be covered with rocks and is apparently uneven on a large scale as indicated by the shadowing. This photo was taken at 1:46 a.m. PST on 20 April 1967.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Surveyor III Lunar Terrain View  #3

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  67-H-471

21 April 1967

Surveyor III's surface sampler is shown in place at the end of the first trench it dug on the lunar surface on April 21, 1967.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Surveyor III Lunar Terrain View  #4

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  67-H-834   -   P-6561 A

30 April 1967

Surface sampler of Surveyor III bears down on apparent small rock or clod in test on lunar surface on April 30th. The object crumbled, proving to be a clod.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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SLV-3 Atlas-Agena D 6151 (AA19) And ATS-1

10 x 8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  119-KSC-66P-571

7 December 1966

Applications Technology Satellite (ATS-1) is a communications and meteorological experiments spacecraft. It was positioned in geosynchronous orbit over the Americas at 151 deg W in 1966; over the Americas at 149 deg W in 1968-1982; over the Pacific Ocean 170 deg E in 1982-1985 As of 3 September 2001 located at 167.30 deg E drifting at 0.065 deg E per day. As of 2007 Mar 9 located at 59.28W drifting at 0.332E degrees per day.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition. VG-

 

 

 

 

 

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Earth Photographed From ATS-1

10 x 8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  66-H-1635-D

13 December 1966

Applications Technology Satellite (ATS-1) is a communications and meteorological experiments spacecraft. It was positioned in geosynchronous orbit over the Americas at 151 deg W in 1966; over the Americas at 149 deg W in 1968-1982; over the Pacific Ocean 170 deg E in 1982-1985 As of 3 September 2001 located at 167.30 deg E drifting at 0.065 deg E per day. As of 2007 Mar 9 located at 59.28W drifting at 0.332E degrees per day.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition. VG-

 

 

 

 

COMSAT's  - INTELSAT  2 Satellites

The 300 lb. Intelsat 2 commercial communication satellites owned by the International Telecommunications Satellite Consortium (INTELSAT) and operated by the Communications Satellite Corporation (COMSAT) will serve as a microwave station in space relaying telephone, teletype, television, data, and other communications traffic between Earth stations thousands of miles apart.

INTELSAT 2 were the world's first commercial communications satellites. They have provided a scheduled transoceanic television, voice,  and data communications services ever since the first one went operational in 1967. COMSAT reimbursed NASA for the cost of the Launch Vehicles and all other costs to put the INTELSAT 2 satellites into Earth orbit.

 

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Thor Delta E1 464/D42 & COMSAT

10 x 8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  66-H-1388

26 October 1966

A new Thrust-Augmented Improved Thor Delta launch vehicle is being prepared to launch the Communications Satellite Corporation's (COMSAT) satellite (INTELSAT 2 F-1) from Pad B of Launch Complex 17 at the Cape.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Delta E1 464/D42 & INTELSAT 2 F-1

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

26 October 1966

The worlds first commercial satellite:

The new improved Thrust-Augmented Thor Delta E1 464/D42 Launch Vehicle lifted off from Launch Complex 17B at the Cape on the 26 October 1966 with the 300 lb. INTELSAT 2 F-1 satellite as its payload.

Sadly this launch was logged as a Partial Failure - The satellite attained a unusable orbit due to AKM failure.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Delta E1 468/D44 & INTELSAT 2 F-2

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

11 January 1967

The first operational commercial satellite:

Thor Delta E1 468/D44 lifted off from LC-17B at the Cape on the 11th of January 1967 with the INTELSAT 2 F-2 satellite as its payload.

After achieving orbit the INTELSAT 2 F-2 was positioned in a geosynchronous orbit over the Pacific Ocean at 174 deg E.  As of 8 March 2007 it was located at 63.48 deg. W. drifting at 0.357W degrees per day.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in good condition with a few faint cracks in the gloss.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Delta E1 470/D47 & INTELSAT 2 F-3

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

21 March 1967

NASA  No.   126P-KSC-67P-121

The Thor Delta E1 470/D47 sits on Pad B of Launch Complex 17 at the Cape  with the INTELSAT 2 F-3 satellite as its payload the day before lift off.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in good condition as it has a crease across the upper left corner. Other than that the rest of the photograph is in mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Thor Delta E1 470/D47 And Intelsat 2 F-3

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   126P-KSC-67P-122

22 March 1967

Thor Delta D47 three stage Launch Vehicle carrying the INTELSAT 2 F-3 communications satellite is seen during a spectacular night launch at 8:30 p.m. EST from Launch Complex 17 Pad B at the Cape.

The Communications Satellite Corp. (COMSAT) satellite after being placed in a high synchronous orbit will serve as a switchboard for four continents. The new satellite is also to be a key relay point between the Earth and Moon-bound Astronauts.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Thor Delta E1 470/D47 And Intelsat 2 F-3  #2

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   67-H-293

22 March 1967

Thor Delta 470/D47 three stage Launch Vehicle carrying the 357 lb. INTELSAT 2 communications satellite is seen during a spectacular night launch at 20:30 EST from pad B of Launch Complex 17 at the Cape.

Upon achieving Earth Orbit the satellite was positioned in geosynchronous orbit over the Atlantic Ocean at 15 deg W.  As of Dec. 5, 2005 it was located at 13.34 deg. E drifting at 0.188W degrees per day.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Delta E1 442/D52 And Intelsat 2 F-4

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   102P-KSC-67P-546

27 September 1967

The Thor Delta E1 442/D52 And Intelsat 2 F-4 lifted from Launch Complex 17B at 8:45 p.m. on the 27th September 1967.

After achieving orbit the INTELSAT 2 F-4 satellite was positioned in geosynchronous orbit over the Pacific Ocean at 176 deg E.  As of March 7, 2007 it was located at 168.68W drifting at 0.093W degrees per day.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Delta G #43 And Biosatellite Spacecraft

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   66-H-1622

12 December 1966

The Delta G #43 stands proudly on Pad A of Launch Complex 17 at the Cape with the Biosatellite spacecraft as a payload two days before lift off.

The Delta G managed to place the spacecraft into Earth orbit with a Perigee of 183 miles Apogee of 192 miles; Inclination: 33.50 deg. for a Period of 90.40 min. However, Re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere was not achieved because the retrorocket failed to ignite. The Biosatellite was never recovered. Although the scientific objectives of the mission were not accomplished, the Biosatellite I experience provided technical confidence in the program because of excellent performance in most other areas.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Biosatellite Spacecraft And Adapter Section

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   66-H-1618

1 December 1966

the Biosatellite spacecraft atop the adapter section is being checked out prior to transporting to Launch Complex 17A at the Cape. The Biosatellite is covered with a white heat ablative shield which will be used to return onboard experiments to Earth.

The Biosatellite was a biological capsule for the investigation of the influence of space flight on living organisms. The first mission in the Biosatellite series, Biosatellite I, was launched on 14 December 1966. Re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere was not achieved because the retrorocket failed to ignite. The biosatellite was never recovered. Although the scientific objectives of the mission were not accomplished, the Biosatellite I experience provided technical confidence in the program because of excellent performance in most of the other areas during the mission.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

1967 September 7 - Biosatellite 2 Launched successfully by a Delta G #47:  Biological capsule recovered. The scientific payload, consisting of 13 select biology and radiation experiments, was exposed to microgravity during 45 hours of Earth-orbital flight. Experimental biology packages on the spacecraft contained a variety of specimens, including insects, frog eggs, micro-organisms and plants. The planned three-day mission was recalled early because of the threat of a tropical storm in the recovery area, and because of a communication problem between the spacecraft and the tracking systems. The primary objective of the Biosatellite II mission was to determine if organisms were more, or less, sensitive to ionizing radiation in microgravity than on Earth. To study this question, an artificial source of radiation was supplied to a group of experiments mounted in the forward part of the spacecraft.

1969 June 29 - Biosatellite-3 Launched successfully by the Thor Delta N 539/D70:  The Biological Capsule re-entered 7 July 1969. The intent had been to fly a 6 kg male pig-tailed monkey (Macaca nemestrina) named Bonnie in Earth-orbit for 30 days. However, after only 8.8 days in orbit, the mission was terminated because of the subject's deteriorating health. High development costs were a strong incentive for maximising the scientific return from the mission. Because of this, the scientific goals had become exceedingly ambitious over time, and a great many measurements were conducted on the single research subject flown. Although the mission was highly successful from a technical standpoint, the science results were apparently compromised. The spacecraft de-orbited after almost 9 days because Bonnie's  metabolic condition deteriorated rapidly. Unfortunately Bonnie expired 8 hours after the spacecraft was recovered, presumably from a massive heart attack brought on by extreme dehydration.

Please note; Bonnie our space hero of Biosatellite-3:  I do not and never would look to capitalize on an animals suffering and or misfortune. I do feel that the photographs of Bonnie and his fellow primate could cause anxiety in some in seeing the treatment of our space hero. However, lets look at the photographs as a testament to Bonnie and the other animals that went through stressful experiments to help further our knowledge in making further manned space flights safer. Click on the below image to view the 9 vintage photographs:

Click Here To See All Photographs Of Bonnie and Her Cousin

Click On The Above Image To See Bonnie's Mini Gallery

Despite the seeming failure of the mission's scientific agenda, Biosatellite III was influential in shaping the life sciences flight experiment program, pointing to the need for centralised management, realistic goals and substantial pre-flight experiment verification testing. The mission objective was to investigate the effect of space flight on brain states, behavioural performance, cardiovascular status, fluid and electrolyte balance, and metabolic state.

 

 

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Thor Delta N 539/D70 - Bonnie & Moon

Payload: Biosatellite 3 

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  102-KSC-69P-539

28 June 1969

A wonderful night time view at LC17A the night before lift off of the Delta N 539.D70 launch vehicle with the Biosatellite 3 satellite as its payload. A rather special photograph as the round circle just to the left of the Delta launch vehicle is the Moon. Everyone mistakes it for a Pad light .. but its the Full Moon hanging low in the Florida sky.

The Thor Delta #539 lifted off from Launch Complex 17A at 11:16 p.m. 29 June 1969 with Bonnie onboard.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Delta E1 #488/D50 And Explorer 35

10  x  8  Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

19 July 1967

A fantastic view looking up form the hard-stand under Launch Complex 17B in the early hours on launch day. This Thor Delta configuration is set to launch Explorer-35 into Earth Orbit.

This fine vintage colour NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

Explorer 35 - The Westinghouse Aerospace Division, under contract to National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Centre, engaged in the system design, integration, assembly and launch support for Anchored Interplanetary Monitoring Platform Satellite, officially designated Explorer 35 by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. It was launched on July 19, 1967, with the primary objectives of investigation of interplanetary plasma and the interplanetary magnetic field out to and at the lunar distance, in either a captured lunar orbit or a geocentric orbit of the earth. In the geocentric orbit, the apogee was near or beyond the lunar distance. In a lunar orbit, additional objectives included obtaining data on dust distribution, lunar gravitational field, ionosphere, magnetic field, and radiation environment around the moon. AIMP-E also studied spatial and temporal relationships of geophysical and interplanetary phenomena simultaneously being studied by several other National Aeronautics and Space Administration satellites. The investigation in the vicinity of the moon provided for measurements of the characteristics of the interplanetary dust distribution, solar and galactic cosmic rays, as well as a study of the magnetohydrodynamic wake of the earth in the interplanetary medium at the lunar distances.

 

 

 

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Thor Delta E1 #488/D50 And Explorer 35

10 x 8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  67-H-1062

19 July 1967

A fantastic ground level view at Launch Complex 17B on launch day of pre-launch activities for the Thor Delta E1 Thrust Augmented configuration and its payload, IMP-E which will be re-named Explorer 35 after achieving orbit.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Radio Astronomy Explorer Satellite

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  G-67-2927

1967

This view shows the cylindrical main body in which the four 750-foot-long antennas will be carried rolled up on drums. Note the four canted solar cell panels. The world's longest satellite at 1,500-feet tip to tip, was designed and built a the NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, Greenbelt, Md. During 1966 final design of the spacecraft was made and work is progressing for the launching in the summer of 1967 from the Western Test Range, Calif.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

1967 March 29 - Apollo Site Selection Board:  The Apollo Site Selection Board meeting at NASA Hq. March 29 heard MSC presentations on lunar landing site selection constraints, results of the Orbiter II screening, and reviews of the tasks for site analysis. MSC made recommendations for specific sites on which to concentrate during the next four months and recommended that the landing sites for the first lunar landing mission be selected by August 1. The Board accepted the recommendations. A Surveyor and Orbiter meeting the following day considered the targeting of the Surveyor C mission and the Lunar Orbiter V mission. MSC representatives at the two meetings were John Eggleston and Owen E. Maynard.

 

 

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Lunar Site Identification Numbers

10 x 8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

Each site on this Lunar Map is identified and listed on the right hand side of the photograph.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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SLV-3 Atlas-Agena D And Lunar Orbiter III

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  122-KSC-67P-49

January 1967

NASA's third Lunar Orbiter spacecraft, mated to an Atlas-Agena space vehicle is made ready for launch at Complex 13 at the Cape.

The Lunar Orbier 3 was launched from Complex 13 on 5 February 1967 and before it crashed into Moon it returned 182 photos of lunar surface from its selenocentric orbit.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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SLV-3 Atlas-Agena D And Lunar Orbiter III

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  67-H-157

January 1967

The third in the series of NASA's Lunar Orbiter spacecraft is being made ready for launching by the Atlas-Agena D booster at Complex 13 at the Cape. The Lunar Orbiter spacecrafts are flown to continue the efforts made with Ranger and Surveyor flights to acquire knowledge of the Moon's surface in addition to supporting NASA's Apollo manned lunar landing program and to enlarge scientific understanding of the Moon.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Lunar Orbiter C Lift Off

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  67-H-164

January 1967

NASA launched Lunar Orbiter C spacecraft at 8:17 p.m. on 5 February 1967 from Complex 13 at the Cape. The 850 pound Orbiter, the third in a series of 5 photographic laboratories was launched by an Atlas-Agena D vehicle and this launch vehicle's configuration was SLV-3 Agena D 5803 (AA20) / Agena D 6632 (AA20).

When successfully injected on its lunar trajector, it will be designated Lunar Orbiter III. Before it crashed into Moon Lunar Orbiter III returned 182 photos of lunar surface from its selenocentric orbit.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Surveyor I Seen From Lunar Orbiter 3

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  67-H-267

14 March 1967

This is a picture of the area containing the Surveyor I spacecraft on the Moon's surface. It is an enlargement from telephoto frame H-194 taken by Lunar Orbiter III on 22 February 1967 at 12:24 a.m. EST. Surveyor I can be detected as a white object casting a shadow approximately 30 feet long. This photo includes an area 350 to 500 feet on the lunar surface. The spacecraft image was located on Orbiter III photography by triangulation of distant objects seen by Surveyor I on its horizon.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Three Views Taken By Lunar Orbiter III

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  67-H-264

14 March 1967

This mosaic of three photographs taken by NASA's Lunar Orbiter III spacecraft shows three views of the area on the Moon where Surveyor I made its soft-landing on 2 June 1966. The pictures were taken on 22 February 1967.

To the left is an oblique view taken by Lunar Orbiter's wide angle lens showing a partial ring structure in Oceanus Procellarum. The square identifies Surveyor's location. In the centre is a picture taken by the Orbiter's telephoto lens with the cameras tilted aproximately 12 degrees off vertical in order to obtain coverage of the Surveyor I region. Surveyor is located within the square.

To the right is a portion of the telephoto picture enlarged about eight times. See above photo 66-H-267.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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4 Photos By NASA's Prime Lunar Missions

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   G-70-1

22 March 1967

4 Lunar views taken from each of NASA's primary Lunar missions.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click Here To See All 15 Japanese MT-135 Glossy Photographs

Special Mini Gallery !

Japan's MT-135 Launch Vehicle

15  Glossy NASA Photograph

Japanese & U. S. Joint Weather Rocket Program

15 mint condition NASA photographs from pre-launch preparations to the launch of the first MT-135 rocket in the joint Japan & U. S. Meteorological Rocket Project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Atlas Centaur D AC-12/292D And Surveyor C

10 x 8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  105-KSC-67P-161

17 April 1967

Surveyor III was launched from the Cape's Launch Complex 36B on 17 April 1967 by the Atlas Centaur D Launch Vehicle. Surveyor III It softly landed on the Moon on 20 April 1967 and successfully performed soil sample tests and took  photographs of the lunar surface.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition. VG++

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Atlas Centaur And Surveyor D

10 x 8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  67-H-1029

14 July 1967

Surveyor D, another lunar soft-landing spacecraft was launched by NASA at 7:53 EDT, 14 July 1967 from Complex 36 at the Cape. The fourth of the series of seven Surveyors planned for lunar missions was launched by an Atlas-Centaur launch vehicle.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in good to very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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AC- 13 Surveyor 5 Night Lift-Off

10 x 8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

8 September 1967

NASA No.  67-H-1212

Surveyor 5 (E) spacecraft, the 5th in NASA's series of Soft Lunar Landing Program, was launched by The Atlas-Centaur SLV-3C AC-13 / Centaur D-1A launch vehicle at 3:57 a.m. EST (7:57 GMT) from Complex 36 at KSC.

Landed 11 September 1967, 00:46:44 UT
Latitude 1.41 N, Longitude 23.18 E - Mare Tranquillitatus (Sea of Tranquility)

Surveyor 5 returned 19,000 photos and soil data from the Moon's surface.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Atlas Agena D And Lunar Orbiter E

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  67-H-1078

1 August 1967

NASA is preparing to launch the Lunar Orbiter E spacecraft from Complex 13 at the Cape. The launching will be the fifth and final in the series of the Lunar Orbiter program. The 860 pound Orbiter will be launched by an Atlas-Agena D vehicle on a flight to the vicinity of the Moon which will bake about 89 hours. During its 14 day photographic mission, the spacecraft will revisit five potential Apollo landing sites previously viewed by Lunar Orbiters 1, 2 and 3 to supply additional telephoto coverage of some promising areas. It will also look at several locations being considered for future Surveyor landings. Some 20 per cent of the available film load will be devoted to these targets.

When Successfully injected on its translunar trajectory, it will be designated Lunar Orbiter 5.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Atlas Agena D And Lunar Orbiter E Lift Off

10 x  8   Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

1 August 1967

the Atlas Agena D with Lunar Orbiter 5 onboard lifts off from Launch Complex 13 at the Cape on 1 August 1967 at 22:33 GMT. The Deep Space Net Tracking Station at Woomera, Australia, acquired the spacecraft about 50 minutes after lift off. Signals indicated that all systems were performing normally and that temperatures were within acceptable limits. At 12:48 p.m. EDT August 5, Lunar Orbiter V executed a de-boost manoeuvre that placed it in orbit around the moon. The spacecraft took its first photograph of the moon at 7:22 a.m. EDT August 6. Before it landed on the lunar surface on January 31, 1968, Lunar Orbiter V had photographed 23 previously un-photographed areas of the moon's far side, the first photo of the full earth, 36 sites of scientific interest, and 5 Apollo sites for a total of 425 photos.

This very fine vintage NASA colour glossy photograph is in very good condition and printed on 'A Kodak Paper'. VG++

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Atlas Agena D And Lunar Orbiter E Lift Off #2

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  67-H-1079

1 August 1967

Lunar Orbiter E was launched by the Atlas-Agena D launch vehicle at 6:33 p.m. 1 August 1967 from the Cape's Complex 13. The Atlas Agena D Launch Configuration was SLV-3 Atlas Agena D 5805 (AA24) / Agena D 6634 (AA24).

When Successfully injected on its translunar trajectory, it will be designated Lunar Orbiter 5.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lunar Orbiter-5 Earth View

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  67-H-1432

August 1967

Luanr Orbiter 5 spacecraft took this photo of the Earth while circling the Moon from a distance of 314,000 miles away.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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First Photo From Lunar Orbiter-5

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  Lunar Orbiter V-1

6 August 1967

An area of the Moon never before photographed is seen in this first picture returned to Earth from Lunar Orbiter 5. The area shown is about 90 miles by 120 miles. The picture shows a heavily cratered upland surface on which is deposited a smoother material which subdues many of the older crater rims and floors.

The photograph was made on August 6 at 4:22 a.m. PDT, and is part of telephoto frame 6. It was received by NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Network tracking station at about 9:00 a.m. PDT August 7, 1967.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1st Of 3 Photos From Lunar Orbiter V

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  Lunar Orbiter V-2

6 August 1967

This is the first of three photographs which together make up a complete frame of Lunar Orbiter V telephoto photography of the Moon. This picture was taken August 6, 1967 from an altitude of 1660 miles and the complete frame (shown below) covers an area of 180 by 550 miles.

The area shown is on the side of the Moon always hidden from Earth behind the left edge. The center of the complete frame (shown below) is at a longitude of 110 deg. West and a latitude of 60 deg. North.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2nd Of 3 Photos From Lunar Orbiter V

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  Lunar Orbiter V-3

6 August 1967

This is the second of three photographs which together make up a complete frame of Lunar Orbiter V telephoto photography of the Moon. This picture was taken August 6, 1967 from an altitude of 1660 miles and the complete frame (shown below) covers an area of 180 by 550 miles.

The area shown is on the side of the Moon always hidden from Earth behind the left edge. The center of the complete frame (shown below) is at a longitude of 110 deg. West and a latitude of 60 deg. North.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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3rd Of 3 Photos From Lunar Orbiter V

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  Lunar Orbiter V-4

6 August 1967

This is the second of three photographs which together make up a complete frame of Lunar Orbiter V telephoto photography of the Moon. This picture was taken August 6, 1967 from an altitude of 1660 miles and the complete frame (shown below) covers an area of 180 by 550 miles.

The area shown is on the side of the Moon always hidden from Earth behind the left edge. The center of the complete frame (shown below) is at a longitude of 110 deg. West and a latitude of 60 deg. North.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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First Wide Angle Photo From LO-5

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  Lunar Orbiter V-5

6 August 1967

One of the first wide angle view of the Moon's hidden side photographed by Lunar Orbiter V in this picture made on August 6, 1967 and transmitted to NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Network tracking station on August 7, 1967.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 The Complete Frame Of The Above 3 Photos
The Complete Frame From Lunar Orbiter 5

First Wide Angle Telephoto View Of Lunar Far Side

Here is what the first wide angle telephoto photograph looks like after connecting the above three photos. The detail is fantastic in these Lunar Orbiter 5 telephoto photographs. Features on the surface as small as 1000 feet across can be easily distinguished in these photos.

If you would like a reprint of the above completed frame just email me so we can discuss what size you would like. The largest I could do is 45 inches x 11 inches. That is just about 4 feet by 1 foot.

 

 

 

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Photo From Lunar Orbiter-5

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  67-H-1101

6 August 1967

Same photo as above V-3

This is the second of three photographs which together make up a complete frame of Lunar Orbiter V telephoto photography of the Moon. This picture was taken August 6, 1967 from an altitude of 1660 miles and the complete frame (shown above) covers an area of 180 by 550 miles.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Moscoviense Seen From Lunar Orbiter-5

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  S-67-47014

August 1967

A fantastic view of the far side of the Moon taken by the Lunar Orbiter-V spacecraft. The large crater at the left centre is named Moscoviense.

This photograph was taken 14 August 1967 and relayed to the Deep Space Network Station at Madrid, Spain from an altitude of 767 miles.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Copernicus Seen From Lunar Orbiter-V

10 x 8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  66-H-1470

August 1967

A striking lunar view as taken by the Luanr Orbiter 5 spacecraft with unbelievable detail. 

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Moon Seen From Lunar Orbiter-5

10 x  8   Black & White NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  122-KSC-67PC-612

14 August 1967

A fantastic view of the far side of the Moon taken by the Lunar Orbiter-V spacecraft. The large crater at the lleft centre is named Moscoviense.

This photograph was taken 14 August 1967 and relayed to the Deep Space Network Station at Madrid, Spain from an altitude of 767 miles.

This very fine vintage NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Atlas Agena D And Comsat ATS-3

10 x  8   Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  114-KSC-67PC-430

5 November 1967

A wonderful night time lift off of the SLV-3 Atlas Agena D with the Comsat ATS-III spacecraft as a payload.

The goals for ATS-3 included investigations of spin stabilisation techniques and VHF and C-band communications experiments. In addition to fulfilling its primary mission, it also provided regular communications service to sites in the Pacific basin and Antarctica, provided emergency communications links during the 1987 Mexican earthquake and the Mt. St. Helens disaster, and supported the Apollo Moon landings.

The satellite also provided the first colour images from space as well as regular cloud cover images of the Earth for meteorological studies. ATS-III weighing 805 pounds and carries nine revolutionary experiments designed to improve communications, meteorology, navigation and spacecraft technology.

This very fine vintage NASA colour glossy photograph is in good condition. G-

 

 

 

 

 

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10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   67-H-1552

10 November 1967

A wonderful view of the Earth taken by ATS-3 from 22,300 out in space.

NASA's Applications Technology Satellite (ATS-3) transmitted this colour image back to a ground station at Rosman, N.C. It was received at 10:30 a.m. EST, November 10, 1967 from it position at 47 degrees W. longitude on the equator over Brazil. The lithograph shows North and South America, part of Africa and Europe as well as the southern part of the Greenland Ice Cap but Antarctica is covered with clouds.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTE: This Is A Official NASA LITHOGRAPH not a photograph.

4.95

ATS-3 View Of The Earth

10 x 8 Colour NASA Lithograph

10 November 1967

A wonderful view of the Earth taken by ATS-3 from 22,300 out in space.

NASA's Applications Technology Satellite (ATS-3) transmitted this colour image back to a ground station at Rosman, N.C. It was received at 10:30 a.m. EST, November 10, 1967 from it position at 47 degrees W. longitude on the equator over Brazil. The lithograph shows North and South America, part of Africa and Europe as well as the southern part of the Greenland Ice Cap but Antarctica is covered with clouds.

This fine vintage colour NASA lithograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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AC-15 And Surveyor 7 Night Lift-Off

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

7 January 1968

NASA No.  68-H-11

Surveyor 7 (G) spacecraft, the last in NASA's series of Soft Lunar Landing Program, was launched by The Atlas-Centaur SLV-3C AC-15 / Centaur D-1A launch vehicle at 1:32 a.m. EST (6:32 GMT) from Complex 36B at KSC.

Landed 10 January 1968, 01:05:36 UT
Latitude 41.01 S, Longitude 348.59 E - Tycho North Rim

This 1968 vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Delta E1 479/D60 And Pioneer 9

10 x 8 Black & White Glossy Photograph

28 February 1966

The Delta 60 stands ready at Launch Complex 17B at the Cape. This LV placed Pioneer 9 in a Heliocentric solar orbit on 28 Feburary 1966 along with the TETR 2 NASA network tracking sattelite.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Delta M 536/D63 And INTELSAT III F-2

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

18 December 1968

NASA No.  102-KSC-68P-632

INTELSAT III F-2 lifts off Pad 17 at the Cape at 7:32 p.m. EST atop a Thrust Augmented Improved Long Tank Delta launch vehicle. Launched for COMSAT by KSC launch teams, the satellite can transmit 1,200 voice channels on four colour TV channels simultaneously.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition. VG-

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

INTELSAT III During Check-Out

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

17 September 1968

NASA No.  68-H-826

The INTELSAT III satellite is seen during check-out in Hangar AE at the Cape. NASA will launch the Intelsat III communications satellite from LC 17 onboard a Thrust Augmented Improved Long Tank Delta rocket. It will be placed in a synchronous orbit over the Equator and will further increase communications coverage of Earth along with others on the series now in orbital positions ringing the Equator.

The satellite is owned by the International Telecommunications Satellite Consortium (INTELSAT) which consists of more than 60 nations. Comsat acts as manager for INTELSAT.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Another INTELSAT III To Check-Out

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

21 April 1970

NASA No.  70-H-685

Another in a series of INTELSAT III satellites is being checked-out in Hangar AE at the Cape. NASA will launch the Intelsat III communications satellite from LC 17 onboard a Thrust Augmented Improved Long Tank Delta rocket. It will be placed in a synchronous orbit over the Equator and will further increase communications coverage of Earth along with others on the series now in orbital positions ringing the Equator.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

ISIS-A Canadian Ionospheric Satellite

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

17 January 1969

NASA No.  69-H-38

The joint Canadian-U.S. program of ionospheric research will move into a new stage with the launching of the Canadian satellite ISIS-A on a NASA Delta rocket from the Western Test Range, Lompoc, Calif. scheduled for January 29, 1969.

ISIS-A (International Satellite for Ionospheric Studies) is the third Canadian ionospheric satellite and the second of five satellites in a cooperative Canadian-U.S. effort. It will continue the study of the ionosphere from above (topside sounding) successfully begun with the Alouette-I satellite.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

OSO - Orbiting Solar Observatories

The Orbiting Solar Observatories, developed for NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, were designed primarily as stabilized platforms for solar-oriented scientific instruments. The OSOs permitted the first extended study of the sun (from above the earth's filtering atmosphere) with accurate positioning. Experiments on the satellites studied the sun, flares and other solar activities, X-ray, gamma and ultraviolet radiation and radiation from extra-solar sources.

The OSO spacecraft were placed in orbit 565 km above earth by a Delta booster and they circled the earth every 96 minutes. Each spacecraft weighed from 200 to 280 kg (including experiments) and carried up to 9 experiments. There were 9 launch attempts made in the OSO program. All achieved orbit except for OSO-C. The designation was used again and OSO-3 was successful. Three of the successful OSO's exceeded their five month design specification. OSO 1, launched March 7, 1962, was. in operation nearly 18 months; OSO 2, launched February 3, 1965, nearly 9 months; OSO 3, launched March 8, 1967, and OSO 4, launched October 18, 1967, continued to send back scientific data through year-end 1968. The prime Contractor for the OSO program was Ball Brothers Research Corporation.

 

 SOLD  For  8.95  

SOLD

Thor Delta 301/D8 And OSO-1

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO. LOD-62PC-25

7 March 1962

A beautiful lift off of the 8th Delta launch with the Thor #301 booster that put the first Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO-1) spacecraft in Earth orbit. A perfect lift off from Launch Complex 17 Pad A.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Orbiting Solar Observatory OSO-1

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO. 62-OSO-6

3 March 1962

The 440-pound OSO-1 spacecraft will attempt to measure ultra-violet, gamma and X-ray radiations from the sun. This spacecraft was successfully launched into earth orbit on 7 March 1962 by the Thor-Delta 301 booster with the Delta #8 second stage from Launch Complex 17 Pad A at the Cape.

The Orbiting Solar Observatories, developed for NASA's Goddard Space Flight Centre, were designed primarily as stabilized platforms for solar-oriented scientific instruments. The OSOs permitted the first extended study of the sun (from above the earth's filtering atmosphere) with accurate positioning. Experiments on the satellites studied the sun, flares and other solar activities, X-ray, gamma and ultraviolet radiation and radiation from extra-solar sources.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Model Of OSO-1 At Goddard

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO. 62-OSO-6

3 March 1962

Two unidentified employees at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Centre. The gentleman standing is holding a model of the OSO-1 spacecraft.

Given time I feel that I can identify these two gentleman as they must have been key executives at Goddard. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  9.95

SOLD

Thor Delta C 411/D29 And OSO-B

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  102-KSC-65PC-6

11 December 1964

Lift off from Launch Complex 17B of the Delta D29 with the Orbiting Solar Observatory B2 (S-17). The OSO-B2 returned solar X-ray, UV, gamma ray data as the Spacecraft engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere and outer space.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD-

Thor Delta C 435/D33 And OSO-C

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

25 August 1965

Lift off from Launch Complex 17B of the Delta D33 with the Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO-C) onboard. Due to Premature third stage ignition, this launch was a failure.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Delta C 431/D46 And OSO 3

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

8 March 1967

The Orbiting Solar Observatory Spacecraft was engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere or outer space. OSO-3 was launched into orbit atop the Delta C D46 Launch Vehicle from LC-17A at the Cape at 4:12 p.m. GMT on 8 March 1967and its decay date was 4 April 1982.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD-

Thor Delta C1 487/D64 And OSO-5

10 x 8 Black & White Glossy Photograph

21 January 1969

NASA No.  69-H-70

The three stage Delta rocket is being made ready to launch NASA's Orbiting Solar Observatory V (OSO-V) Satellite at Launch Complex 17B at the Cape on the following day, 22 January 1969. OSO-V is designed to continue observations of the sun as part of a continuous program to monitor an 11-year cycle.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition. 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  8.95

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NASA's OSO-5 Satellite

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

January 1969

NASA No.  69-H-148

NASA's Orbiting Solar Observatory-V spacecraft undergoes checks in Hangar AE at the Cape, in preparation for its January 22nd launching on the Thor Delta C1 from LC17B at the Cape. The 641 pound spacecraft will carry eight experiments designed to study the sun and its influence on the Earth.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  4.95

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NASA's OSO-V Satellite #2

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

January 1969

NASA No.  69-H-54

NASA's Orbiting Solar Observatory-V spacecraft was launched into space on 22 January 1969 onboard a Thor Delta C1 rocket from LC17B at the Cape. The 641 pound spacecraft will carry eight experiments designed to study the sun and its influence on the Earth in a 11 year cycle.

The Orbiting Solar Observatories, developed for NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, were designed primarily as stabilized platforms for solar-oriented scientific instruments. The OSOs permitted the first extended study of the sun (from above the earth's filtering atmosphere) with accurate positioning. Experiments on the satellites studied the sun, flares and other solar activities, X-ray, gamma and ultraviolet radiation and radiation from extra-solar sources.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in poor to very good condition as it has a smudge on the upper left corner. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

NASA's OSO-I Full Scale Model

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  71-H-1070

July 1971

A full scale model of NASA's Orbiting Solar Observatory-I (eye). To be launched in late 1973 the OSO-I will carry experiments designed to investigate the sun's lower corona and chromosphere and their interface in the X-ray and ultraviolet spectral region to better understand the transport of energy from the photosphere to the corona. Hughes Aircraft in El Segundo, Calif. is the prime contractor for the OSO-I, J and K.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

NASA's OSO-I Full Scale Model  #2

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  71-H-1069

July 1971

Technicians inspect a full scale model of NASA's Orbiting Solar Observatory-I (eye). To be launched in late 1973 the OSO-I will carry experiments designed to investigate the sun's lower corona and chromosphere and their interface in the X-ray and ultraviolet spectral region to better understand the transport of energy from the photosphere to the corona. Hughes Aircraft in El Segundo, Calif. is the prime contractor for the OSO-I, J and K.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

NASA's OSO-7  Map Of The Sun

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

Released: 3 December 1971

NASA No.  71-H-1822

This is a map of the solar corona obtained by OSO-7 and presented on a computerized colour display. It shows the 'Polar Caps' by the dark area upper left and lower right which may be as much as 1/2 million degrees Kelvin cooler than the surrounding 2 million degrees K. corona. Imbedded in the sun's equatorial corona are hot spots where temperatures may rise to 40 million degrees Kelvin during solar flares. The sun is currently nearing the end of its 11 year cycle, previously thought to be a relatively quiet period.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition. 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

NASA's OSO-7 View Of Solar Storm

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

2 August 1972

NASA No.  72-H-1177

NASA's OSO-7 viewed intense storm activity on the sun August 2, 1972 in ultraviolet light with it spectroheliograph sensor. The picture was received in digital form at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, and was reconstructed by a computer-driven colour television system.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Goddard SFC Sun Storm View

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

10 August 1972

NASA No.  72-H-1165

Sun Storm Region, upper right, covering an area of 100,000 miles across, passes over west limb of sun is photographed by the solar telescope at Goddard Space Flight Centre, Greenbelt, Md. The vast storm, most intense in several years, was first observed by sensors on NASA's OSO-7 on July 26, 1972. Its magnitude was recognized and warnings were issued on July 28th two days before it became visible to ground based observatories.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition. 

 

 

 

 

 

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MSC View Of Solar Flares

10 x 8 B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  108-KSC-69P-829

22 October 1969

This view taken October 22, 1969, highlights active solar flares on the Sun's surface. The view was taken through the Solar Telescope at the Manned Spacecraft Centre, Houston, Texas. The 'Hot Spots' are the light areas on the sun.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Delta 1910 586/D112 & OSO 8

10  x  8  Black & White NASA Photograph

NASA No.  102-KSC-75P-320

21 June 1975

From Launch Complex 17B at the Cape, the two-stage Delta launch vehicle lifts off at 7:43 a.m. EDT with the 2,400 pound Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO-8) as its payload. OSO-8 will continue the study of the Sun and its 11 year solar cycle.

This fine vintage NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Thorad Agena D And SERT 2

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   70-H-136

4 February 1970

Space Electric Rocket Test (SERT)

A fine night launch of the Thorad Agena D at the Western Test Range with the spacecraft SERT 2 onboard. SERT 2 was  a spacecraft to test electric rocket engines in space. The first long-duration of orbital electron-bombardment ion engines. The engines functioned until 1980.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

SERT 2 Mated In Its Shroud

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   70-H-134

2 February 1970

Space Electric Rocket Test (SERT)

A shroud is placed over the SERT II spacecraft atop the Thorad Agena D at the Western Test Range. SERT II was  a spacecraft to test electric rocket engines in space. The first long-duration of orbital electron-bombardment ion engines. SERT 2 will be placed in a circular orbit 621 statute miles above the Earth and in a plane inclined 99.1 degrees to the Equator. Satisfactory operation for a period of six months or longer will be a milestone in the advancement of electric propulsion. The engines functioned until 1980.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. Slightly bent lower right corner as seen in the scan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

SERT 2 In Orbit

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   74-H-909

9 October 1974

Space Electric Rocket Test (SERT)

This fine artist's concept shows the SERT II spacecraft in a circular, near polar Earth orbit. Managed by NASA's Lewis Research Centre, the spacecraft was launched into an initial 620-mile high orbit on 3 February 1970, to test the operation of two electron-bombardment ion engines in space.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Scout B S178C With Frogs Onboard

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   70-H-1412

9 November 1970

NASA's Orbiting Frog Otolith (OFO) was launched a 1 a.m. EST from NASA's Wallops Station on Wallops Island, Va. atop the Scout B with two live frogs onboard. The satellite carrying the OFO-A experiment remained in orbit for almost seven days and recovery of the spacecraft was not planned. The payload was the Frog Otolith Experiment Package (FOEP). The objective of the experiment was to investigate the effect of microgravity on the otolith, a sensory organ that responds to changes in an animal's orientation within the Earth's gravitational field. Two bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) were used as experimental subjects in the flight experiment.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

NASA's Orbiting Frogs Otolich

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   70-H-1413

November 1970

NASA's Orbiting Frog Otolith (OFO) was launched at 1 a.m. EST from NASA's Wallops Station on Wallops Island, Va. atop the Scout B with two live frogs onboard. The two live bull frogs orbited the Earth every 1-1/2 hours in an experiment aimed at providing new information on how man's inner ear helps him keep his balance. the frogs will be monitored for about five days alternately in weightless condition and periods of partial gravity created by spinning them in the centrifuge that houses them. Shown inserting the space frogs in the spacecraft are  Dr. Gualtierotti and Frank Wolf.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.95

NASA's Orbiting Frogs Otolich #2

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   70-H-1414

November 1970

NASA's Orbiting Frog Otolith (OFO) was launched at 1 a.m. EST from NASA's Wallops Station on Wallops Island, Va. atop the Scout B with two live frogs onboard. The two live bull frogs orbited the Earth every 1-1/2 hours in an experiment aimed at providing new information on how man's inner ear helps him keep his balance. the frogs will be monitored for about five days alternately in weightless condition and periods of partial gravity created by spinning them in the centrifuge that houses them. Shown inserting the space frogs in the spacecraft are Richard Caskey and Dr. Gualtierotti.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

OAO - Orbiting Astronomical Observatory

There were to be 4 OAO's and the first was launched into orbit by an Atlas Centaur SLV-3 Launch Vehicle. OAO-2 was launched from the Cape into geosynchronous transfer orbit by a Atlas Centaur SLV-3 launch Vehicle on 7 December 1968. The OAO-2 carried 11 telescopes; performed X-ray, UV, IR observations of stars and engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere and outer space. OAO-3 Failed as its Shroud did not separate from the Atlas Centaur SLV-3 launch vehicle on 30 November 1970.

 

8.95

GEP Acceptance Tests And The OAO-B

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  70-H-1338

29 October 1970

Goddard Experiment Package (GEP) the world's largest space astronomy telescope undergoes final pre-flight acceptance tests in Hangar AE at the Cape. Weighing over 1,000 pounds and measuring 38-inches in diameter, the GEP will observe distant stars and galaxies, plus the areas from which stars are born (instellar dust), with a precision never before obtainable in space astronomy.

The telescope in OAO-B is named 'Goddard Experiment Package' (GEP) for the late Dr. Robert H. Goddard, 'Father of the modern rocket'.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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"Goddard  Experiment Package" OAO-B

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  70-H-1475

16 November 1970

The world's largest space astronomy telescope is being readied by Grumman personnel for orbital flight in Hangar AE at the Cape. After pre-flight checks it will be taken to Launch Complex 36B and mated with the waiting Atlas Centaur SLV-3 launch vehicle which lifted off on 30 November 1970.

The Atlas Centaur SLV-3 launch vehicle was to have put its payload into geosynchronous transfer orbit but the shroud failed to separate and the mission was logged as a failure. If OAO-B would have attained its 466-mile circular orbit it would have been called OAO-3.

The telescope in OAO-B is named 'Goddard Experiment Package' (GEP) for the late Dr. Robert H. Goddard, 'Father of the modern rocket'.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  8.95  

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"Copernicus" OAO-C  Pre-Flight In Hangar AE

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  72-H-1167

11 August 1972

The Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO-C) is in Hangar AE at the Cape as preparations continue on schedule for the launch of the fourth and final spacecraft in the OAO series.

Copernicus (OAO-C) will be noted as OAO-3 after attaining its geosynchronous transfer orbit on via an Atlas Centaur SLV-3 launch vehicle. It was successfully placed into orbit on 21 August 1972 by the Atlas Centaur SLV-3 - AC-22/D-1A - 5004C Launch Vehicle.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

"Copernicus" OAO-C  In Hangar AE  #2

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  72-H-1168

11 August 1972

A "star tracker" navigational device used on OAO-C to gain reference on known stars to orientate the spacecraft in orbit is tested by Grumman Aerospace Corporation personnel. KSC's Unmanned Launch Operations Directorate is in charge of the launch, to be conducted by employees of General Dynamics / Convair Aerospace.

Copernicus (OAO-C) will be noted as OAO-3 after attaining its geosynchronous transfer orbit on via an Atlas Centaur SLV-3 launch vehicle. It was successfully placed into orbit on 21 August 1972 by the Atlas Centaur SLV-3 - AC-22/D-1A - 5004C Launch Vehicle.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  8.95

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Two-Stage Atlas-Centaur SLV-3 And OAO-C

SLV-3C Centaur AC-22/D-1A 5004C

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.   72-H-1169

August 1972

OAO-C will be renamed to OAO-3 after being placed into orbit.

A very similar configuration that launched Mariner 10 into solar orbit, the two-stage Atlas-Centaur is returned to its launch support tower following a three-hour tanking test at KSC's Launch Complex 36B. This Atlas-Centaur will place an Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO-3) into a circular orbit 740 kilometres above the Earth. After placement into orbit the OAO-3 will carry one large telescope and three smaller ones to study the composition, density and physical state of matter in interstellar space.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD-

SLV-3C Atlas Centaur AC-22/D-1A 5004C

And the OAO-C  "Copernicus"

10 x 8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  72-H-1194

21 August 1972

OAO-C will be renamed to OAO-3 after being placed into orbit.

Copernicus (OAO-3) was launched by the Atlas-Centaur rocket at 6:28 a.m., 21 August 1972. It was placed into a near circular orbit with a high point of 749 km and a low point of 741 km. It circles the earth every 99.8 minutes. Its mission is to study the heavens in ultraviolet and x-ray regions of the electromagnetic spectrum in order to help scientists better understand the evolutionary processes taking place in the universe. It was named in honour of the Polish Astronomer Nicolas Copernicus (1473-1543).

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you for viewing - I will be adding more Vintage Unmanned Mission photographs soon.

 

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