Unmanned Missions

1957  to  1964

Original Vintage NASA Photographs

Last Up Date  12 August 2016

 

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1954 June 25 - Project Orbiter begun:  In a meeting, Dr. Wernher von Braun, Frederick C. Durant III, Alexander Satin, David Young, Dr. Fred L. Whipple, Dr. S. Fred Singer, and Commander George W. Hoover agreed that a Redstone rocket with a Loki cluster as the second stage could launch a satellite into a 200-mile orbit without major new developments. This became a joint Army-Navy study project after meeting at Redstone Arsenal on August 3. Project Orbiter was a later outgrowth of this proposal and resulted in the launching of Explorer I on January 31, 1958.

1955 August 24 - Redstone recommended as satellite launcher:  Research and development Policy Council (DOD) unanimously recommended that the time-risk factor in the scientific satellite program be brought to the attention of the Secretary of the Defence for determination as to whether a Redstone backup program was indicated.

1957 October 5 - Von Braun promises first US satellite in 60 days:  Von Braun briefs Secretary of Defence McElroy on Jupiter-C/Redstone for immediate US satellite launch. Promises launch in 60 days.

1957 November 8 - Von Braun ordered to launch satellite:  Secretary of Defence Neil McElroy directed the Army to proceed with the launching of the Explorer earth satellites. This order, in effect, resumed the Orbiter project that had been eliminated from the IGY satellite planning program on September 9, 1955. Von Braun was to modify two Jupiter-C missiles (modified Redstones) and attempt to place an artificial earth satellite in orbit by March 58.

1958 February 1 - Explorer 1:  Explorer I, the first U.S. earth satellite, was launched by a modified Army Redstone Ballistic Missile, Jupiter-C. Explorer I, developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, carried the U.S.-IGY (International Geophysical Year) experiment of James A. Van Allen and resulted in the discovery of the radiation belt around the earth. Explorer is still in Earth orbit today.

 

 

 

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Lockheed X-17 R-25

Designed to study the aerothermodynamics of atmospheric re-entry.

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy USAF Photograph

USAF No.  PL-21626

21 March 1957

The Lockheed X-17 R-25 is seen ready to launch on Launch Pad 3 at the Cape for a 4203-A4 re-entry vehicle test flight. Apogee 103 km (64 mi).

This fine vintage USAF glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Lockheed X-17A

Designed to study the aerothermodynamics of atmospheric re-entry.

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy USN Photograph

USN No.  1039753

9 July 1958

The Lockheed X-17A is ready to launch from the Fantail onboard the USS Norton Sound some where off the coast of San Clemente for a Argus Test Flight. Apogee 450 km  (270 mi).

This fine vintage USN glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Project ARGUS

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA/USAF  No.  59- 161226

2 April 1959

During the recently announced Project Argus rockets like these were fired from various localities to test important scientific theories on electron trapping in the Earth's Magnetic Field. This portion of the project, designated Jason, was performed by the U.S. Air Force's Special Weapons Center, Kirkland AFB, New Mexico, on 2 April 1959.

This very fine 1970's reissued NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

Jupiter C

The Jupiter-C is a Redstone missile that was stretched and modified with different propellants to serve as a first stage for IRBM nose cone/orbital test vehicles.

The Jupiter-C was developed by the rocket development team directed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and was employed to launch Explorer 1, 3 and 4.

 

 

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Jupiter C RS-29 And Explorer 1

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  Space-12

1 February 1958

A very beautiful close up of the Jupiter C RS-29 booster with Explorer 1 onboard as it lifts off from Launch Complex 26A at the Cape.

Explorer 1 - Discovered Van Allen radiation belts and was the first successful US orbital launch. Spacecraft engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere or outer space.

This very  fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pre-Launch Activity Of Explorer 1

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   116-KSC-68P-1

29 January 1958

Pre-flight Loxing activity for the Jupiter C RS-29 booster with the Explorer 1 satellite onboard as it payload sitting on Pad A of Launch Complex 26 at the Cape.

This very fine 1978 vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

This image was first reissued in 1968 for the 10th anniversary of the Explorer 1 launch and this photo was again reissued in 1978 for the 20th anniversary of the Explorer 1 mission. Classed as a vintage photo as it over 30 years old.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Explorer 1 Onboard Jupiter C RS-29

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   116-KSC-68P-17

1 February 1958

A very beautiful close up of the Jupiter C RS-29 booster with Explorer 1 onboard as it lifts off from Launch Complex 26A at the Cape.

Explorer 1 - Discovered Van Allen radiation belts and was the first successful US orbital launch. Spacecraft engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere or outer space.

This very fine 1978 vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

This image was first reissued in 1968 for the 10th anniversary of the Explorer 1 launch and this photo was again reissued in 1978 for the 20th anniversary of the Explorer 1 mission. Classed as a vintage photo as it over 30 years old.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Block House At Launch Complex 26

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   116-KSC-68-168

1 February 1958

Block House activity for the during the Explorer 1 launch on 1 February 1958.

This very fine 1978 vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

This image was first reissued in 1968 for the 10th anniversary of the Explorer 1 launch and this photo was again reissued in 1978 for the 20th anniversary of the Explorer 1 mission. Classed as a vintage photo as it over 30 years old.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Explorer 1 Satellite

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  58-Explorer I-2

January 1958

This is a photograph of a model of Explorer I in a space atmosphere. This 18-lb. satellite was placed in orbit 1 February 1958 by the Jupiter-C RS-29 rocket. Explorer I discovered the first of two circular radiation belts surrounding the Earth.

Spacecraft Explorer A - Discovered Van Allen radiation belts. Spacecraft engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere or outer space.

This fine 1978 vintage NASA glossy reissue is in very good condition with NASA's purple worm logo and text on the back. VG+  Reissued for the 20th anniversary of the Explorer 1 mission.

 

 

 

 

International Geophysical Year (IGY)    July 1957 -  December 1958

Following a suggestion by NAS member Lloyd Berkner, the International Council of Scientific Unions in 1952 proposed a comprehensive series of global geophysical activities to span the period July 1957-December 1958. The International Geophysical Year (IGY), as it was called, was modelled on the International Polar Years of 1882-1883 and 1932-1933 and was intended to allow scientists from around the world to take part in a series of coordinated observations of various geophysical phenomena. Although representatives of 46 countries originally agreed to participate in the IGY, by the close of the activity, 67 countries had become involved..

 

SOLD

Nike-Cajun Research Rocket

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  Space-11

1958

A Team of U.S. scientists watching a Nike-Cajun research rocket immediately after its launching from Fort Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. The man at the right is prparing to release a balloon to obtain wind conditions at the time of launching. At the left is a covered tower for launching Aero-bee rockets. These experiments were a part of the United States contribution to the International Geophysical Year.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

Launch Complex 26

The LC-26 dual launch pad complex was constructed for the U.S. Army's Redstone and Jupiter missile programs. Construction started in 1956, and both pads were occupied in May 1957. Pad 26A supported its first Jupiter launch on 28 August 1957. At least 36 Redstone, Jupiter, Jupiter C and Juno II launches were conducted from Complex 26 before the site was deactivated in 1964. On 20 November 1964, the complex was reassigned for development as the USAF Space Museum. Since 1966, the USAF Space Museum has been open to the public. The museum includes Complex 26's blockhouse, an exhibit hall and an outdoor display area featuring about 70 missile and space launch vehicles. Complex 26 was declared a national historic landmark in April 1984.

 

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Aerial View Of Launch Complex 26

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   116-KSC-68-165

8 January 1958

A fine overall view of Launch Complex 26 Pads A & B as seen on 8 January 1958.

This very fine 1978 vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

This image was first reissued in 1968 for the 10th anniversary of the Explorer 1 launch and this photo was again reissued in 1978 for the 20th anniversary of the Explorer 1 mission. Classed as a vintage photo as it over 30 years old.

 

 

 

NASA's Vanguard Program

The Vanguard was a 'civilian' vehicle developed by the US Navy to launch America's first satellite as part of the International Geophysical Year. The Army & von Braun's Jupiter-C ended up launching the first US satellite after pressure to act because of the USSR's Sputnik and Vanguard's public launch failures. Vanguard's second stage design led to the Able upper stage for Thor, Atlas and Delta as well as the third stage of Scout. Furthermore its solid-propellant stages were used in Polaris and Minuteman missiles. These advances are still in use in the 21st Century.

Vanguard 1 was a 2 lb. engineering test satellite that drew data based on its orbital position. The actual shape of the Earth was recorded more accurately as a result of data derived from Vanguard 1's transmissions.

After completing three years in orbit, Vanguard 1 continued transmitting its data. Vanguard 1 provided much useful data on orbits, solar pressure and was mostly noted for data that identified the slight pear-shape of the Earth.

Vanguard 1 Chronology

1955 August 1 - Vanguard selected to launch first US satellite: - Ad Hoc Committee on Special Capabilities rejects Army/Von Brauns's Project Orbiter (Redstone) and USAF Atlas proposals; selects Navy/Vanguard for first US satellite.

1955 September 9 - Project Vanguard began operations: - The Department of Defense's Stewart Committee reviewed the alternatives for an IGY satellite program: wait for the development of an Atlas launcher, use a modified Redstone, or develop a rocket derived from the Viking missile. The committee voted seven to two in favor of abandoning Project Orbiter (Redstone) and developing Vanguard (Viking derivative with and Aerobee-Hi upper stage). Secretary Donald Quarles ruled with the committee majority in the Department of Defense Policy Committee, which approved the decision. The Department of Defense wrote a letter to the Department of Navy authorizing the Navy Research Laboratory to proceed with the Vanguard proposal. The responsibility for carrying out the program was placed with the Office of Naval Research. Objectives of Project Vanguard were: to develop and procure a satellite-launching vehicle; to place at least one satellite in orbit around the earth during IGY; to accomplish one scientific experiment; and to track flight to demonstrate the satellite actually attained orbit.

1955 October 7 - Vanguard contract awarded: -  Prime contract for Project Vanguard awarded the Martin Co.

1957 April 11 - Vanguard payload tested on sounding rocket: - U.S.-IGY scientific satellite equipment, including a radio transmitter and instruments for measuring temperature, pressure, cosmic rays, and meteoric dust encounters, was tested above earth for the first time, as a rocket containing this equipment was fired by the Navy to a 126-mile altitude.

1957 May 1 - Vanguard suborbital test:  Vanguard Test Vehicle (TV-1), a modified Martin Viking first-stage and Vanguard solid-propellant third-stage Grand Central Rocket as second-stage, launched with instrumented nose cone to an altitude of 121 miles and met all test objectives.

1957 October 1 - Vanguard tracking system operational:  Project Vanguard world-wide tracking system (minitrack) became operational.

1957 October 9 - Vanguard supported by Eisenhower: - President Eisenhower in a White House press release congratulated the Soviet scientists on SPUTNIK I. He gave a brief history of the development of the U.S.-IGY satellite program and pointed to the separation of Project Vanguard from work on ballistic missiles.

1957 October 23 - Vanguard TV2 Test mission: - IGY Vanguard prototype (TV-2) with simulated second and third stage successfully met test objectives, by reaching 109-mile altitude and 4,250 mph.

1957 December 6 - Vanguard 1A:  First US orbital attempt. IGY Vanguard (TV-3), the first with three live stages, failed to launch the test satellite. The vehicle lost thrust and exploded 2 seconds after lift off.

1958 February 5 - Vanguard 1B: - Trial firing of IGY Vanguard (TV-3Bu) satellite. Control system malfunction - control was lost 57 sec. after lift off.

1958 March 17 - Vanguard 1: - This time it was successful and the 2 lb. satellite was placed into orbit around the Earth. Perigee: 654 km (406 mi). Apogee: 3,868 km (2,403 mi). Vanguard 1 transmitted pear-shaped earth data and had a life expectancy of perhaps a 1,000 years. The satellite had a mass of 1.6 kg and a diameter of 175 cm.

1961 March 17 - Vanguard 1 Third Anniversary: - Vanguard 1 completed its third year in orbit and was still transmitting data. Vanguard 1 provided much useful data on orbits, including the slight pear-shape of the Earth and the effect of solar pressure. The Vanguard Launch Vehicle program also provided the second stage for the Able, Delta, and Able-Star, as well as the third stage of Scout, pioneering solid-propellant stages used in Polaris and Minuteman.

 

 

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Cut Away View Of Vanguard 1

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

March 1958

Cut away view giving all primary details of the Vanguard Launch Vehicle.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Vanguard 1 Lift Off

U.S. Second Satellite.

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  PL-33939

17 March 1958

The Vanguard LV and Vanguard 1 satellite lifts off from the Cape. This time it was successful and the 2 lb. satellite was placed into orbit around the Earth. Perigee: 654 km (406 mi). Apogee: 3,868 km (2,403 mi).

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Vanguard 1 Lift Off  #3

U.S. Second Satellite.

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  PL-33938

17 March 1958

The Vanguard LV and Vanguard 1 satellite lifts off from the Cape. This time it was successful and the 2 lb. satellite was placed into orbit around the Earth. Perigee: 654 km (406 mi). Apogee: 3,868 km (2,403 mi).

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Vanguard 1 Lift Off  #4

U.S. Second Satellite.

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  PL-33933

17 March 1958

The Vanguard LV and Vanguard 1 satellite lifts off from the Cape. This time it was successful and the 2 lb. satellite was placed into orbit around the Earth. Perigee: 654 km (406 mi). Apogee: 3,868 km (2,403 mi).

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  9.95

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Vanguard 1 Lift Off  #5

U.S. Second Satellite.

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  PL-33932

17 March 1958

The Vanguard LV and Vanguard 1 satellite lifts off from the Cape. This time it was successful and the 2 lb. satellite was placed into orbit around the Earth. Perigee: 654 km (406 mi). Apogee: 3,868 km (2,403 mi).

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

Vanguard 3

It took 3 attempts to get the Vanguard 3 satellite into orbit. The first attempt (Vanguard 3A) on 14 April 1959 on board the Vanguard SLV-5 and a 30 inch Sphere Air Density Satellite was a second payload on that launch attempt. The second stage was damaged on separation and the Vanguard launch vehicle only reached apogee of 100 km. As the Vanguard satellite did not reach orbit it was named Vanguard 3A.

The second attempt (Vanguard 3B) was on 22 June 1959 using the Vanguard SLV-6 but it developed second stage propulsion problems and only reached an apogee 140 km.

On 18 September 1959 Vanguard 3 reached orbit. launched from the Cape's Launch Complex 18A onboard the Vanguard SLV-7 launch vehicle. However, the launch was not without its problems. The third stage failed to separate from its payload so the burned out fiberglass third stage was left attached to the Satellite. Since the fiberglass case did not adversely affect the experiments the mission was logged as a success and the satellite was noted as Vanguard 3.

 

 

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Vanguard 3A Satellite(s) Before Mating

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

April 1959

Seen on display is the Vanguard 3 Satellite and the 30 inch Sphere Air Density Satellite that will be mated with the Vanguard SLV-5 Launch Vehicle.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Vanguard 3A 30 Inch Sphere

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

March 1958

Seen on display is the inflatable 30 inch Sphere Air Density Satellite that will be mated with the Vanguard SLV-5 Launch Vehicle along with the Vanguard 3A Satellite.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Vanguard 30 Inch Sphere Test

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

April 1959

The test infatuation of the 30 inch Sphere Air Density Satellite that will be mated with the Vanguard SLV-5 Launch Vehicle along with the Vanguard 3 Satellite is seen floating above the Cape.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Vanguard 3A Satellite Ready For Mating

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

14 April 1959

The Vanguard Satellite is seen just prior to mating with the Vanguard SLV-5 Launch Vehicle on Pad A of Launch Complex 18 at the Cape.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Vanguard 3A Satellite Mated With SLV-5

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

14 April 1959

The Vanguard 3A is being mated with the Vanguard SLV-5 Launch Vehicle along with the 30 inch Sphere Air Density Satellite that sits under it. A wonderful vintage birds eye view at Pad A of Launch Complex 18 at the Cape.

The Vanguard SLV-5 was launched on April 14, 1959 from LC18A at the Cape but about 100 km downrange the second stage received damage at separation and the mission was a failure so the Satellite was noted as Vanguard 3A. If it would have achieved orbit it would have been named just Vanguard 3.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Unidentified Vanguard

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

This fine vintage colour glossy photograph is in fair condition as it has a few age spots in the gloss in the upper portion of the picture.

 

 

 

1958 March 5 -  Launch of Explorer 2 - The Explorer A spacecraft was launched from Launch Complex 26A by the Redstone RS/CC- 26 (Jupiter C Model) and was a failure because the Fourth Stage failed to ignite.

 

 

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The Jupiter C RS-24 And Explorer 3

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  EX-280/3

26 March 1958

The Jupiter-C RS-24 lifts off from Launch Complex 5 at the Cape at 17:38 GMT with Explorer 3 onboard.

The Explorer 3 spacecraft was successfully launched onboard the Redstone RS-24 (Jupiter C Model);  Perigee: 186 km (115 mi). Apogee: 2,799 km (1,739 mi). Inclination: 33.40 deg. Period: 115.70 min. and returned its radiation, micrometeoroid data to the ground crew.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jupiter C RS/CC #44 And Explorer 4

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  PL58-44349

26 July 1958

A very beautiful close up of the Jupiter C #44 booster (modified Redstone) with Explorer 4 (Explorer B Spacecraft) onboard as it lifts off from Launch Complex 05 at the Cape.

Explorer B - A Magnetosphere Spacecraft that mapped Argus radiation.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD-

Jupiter C RS/CC #44 And Explorer 4   #2

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  PL58-44349

26 July 1958

A very beautiful close up of the Jupiter C #44 booster with Explorer 4 onboard as it lifts off from Launch Complex 05 at the Cape.

Explorer B - A Magnetosphere Spacecraft that mapped Argus radiation.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Jupiter C RS/CC #44 And Explorer 4   #3

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  M60-731-3

26 July 1958

A very beautiful close up of the Jupiter C #44 booster with Explorer 4 onboard as it lifts off from Launch Complex 05 at the Cape.

Explorer B - A Magnetosphere Spacecraft that mapped Argus radiation.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

Pioneers 0, 1 and 2 -  These were the first U. S. spacecraft to attempt to leave Earth orbit. Propelled by the U. S. 's desire to beat the Soviet Union to the moon, each of the three vehicles was designed to go into orbit around the Moon and photograph the Moon's surface. None of the vehicles accomplished its intended mission, although some useful data was returned.

The first vehicle, Pioneer 0, was launched by the USAF and was destroyed 77 seconds after launch when the rocket's first stage exploded. Following this attempt, Pioneer 1 and Pioneer 2 were turned over to United States' newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Pioneer 1 was the first spacecraft launched by NASA. A programming error in the Pioneer 1 launch vehicle upper stage resulted in Pioneer 1 being given insufficient velocity to escape the Earth's gravitational field. Although lunar orbit was not achieved, it did reach an altitude of 113854 km above Earth and provided data on the extent of the Earth's radiation belts. The vehicle re-entered over the Pacific Ocean 2 days later. Pioneer 2 also suffered a launch vehicle failure and re-entered the Earth's atmosphere 6 hours and 52 minutes after launch (it did not return any significant data). Some details of the spacecraft: Paint pattern for thermal control of multi-instrument payload. Spin stabilised. Retro-rocket for lunar orbit insertion. Payload: TV camera. Magnetometer. Micrometeroid impact detector and they had a radiation detector.

 

 

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Thor Able-127 And Lunar Probe #1

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  PL 58-45040

17 August 1958

The first Lunar Probe (Pioneer 0) was managed and launched by the USAF on 17 August 1958. 77 seconds after lift off the 1st stage exploded. After this the USAF turned all other Lunar Probes over to the new agency, NASA.

Pioneer 0 - Lunar Probe No 1.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NASA's First Spacecraft Launch

Thor Able-I #130 And Pioneer 1

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  PL-58-46804

11 October 1958

The Thor Able I No. 133 and Pioneer 1 (Lunar Probe #2) is seen lifting off into the night sky from Launch Complex 17 Pad A at the Cape.

The Pioneer 1 mission set a distance record but failed to reach the moon due to the third stage that did not produced sufficient thrust to escape Earth's gravity.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

19.95

Thor Able-I #129 And Pioneer 2

10  x  8  Colour High Glossy NASA Photograph

November 1958

A fantastic vintage scene on top of the pad at Launch Complex 17B during pre-flight activities and mating of the Pioneer 2 spacecraft to the Thor Able launch vehicle.

Pioneer 2 was launched from the Atlantic Missile Range, using a Thor-Able booster, by the Air Force acting as executive agent to NASA. The 86.3-pound instrumented payload was intended as a lunar probe but it did not reach escape velocity as the third stage failed to ignite.

This fine vintage high glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Juno II and Pioneer 3

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  PL-58-48751

6 December 1958

A brilliant night scene as the Juno II (Jupiter AM-11 configuration) launch vehicle lifts off from Launch Complex 5 with Pioneer 3 onboard as its payload.

Pioneer 3 was intended to be a  lunar probe under the direction of NASA with the Army acting as executive agent however it failed when the launch vehicle first's stage cut-off prematurely. Although Pioneer 3 did not achieve escape velocity, it reached an altitude of 102,332 km and discovered a second radiation belt around Earth.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Juno II and NASA's Team

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  MFL-58-1635

1958

NASA first Juno II, Jupiter configuration test launch vehicle and the team that will see the Explorer spacecrafts are launched into space, are all assembled together at Launch Complex 5 at the Cape.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in good to very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Juno II and Explorer S-1

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  PL-59-17818

16 July 1959

The Juno II, Jupiter configuration stands proudly on Pad 5 at the Cape with Explorer S-1 as its payload. Launched by the Jupiter LV it ended as a failure. Control was lost after 5.5 sec. and it was destroyed by the range safety officer. 

NASA's Explorer S-1 Spacecraft was a Earth Class Magnetosphere type spacecraft to study Magnetic fields and to return solar flare data.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

1958 August 24 -  Launch of Explorer 5 - This Redstone launch was a failure as the First Stage collided with upper stages and the Second Stage ignited in the wrong direction.

 

 

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Thor Able-III No. 134 & Explorer 6

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

7 August 1959

A beautiful view of the Thor Able-3 #134 carrying Explorer-6 into space. This Thor Delta configuration successfully launched Explorer-6 into orbit from Launch Complex 17 at the Cape.

Explorer 6 S-2 Spacecraft: A Magnetosphere Spacecraft that took the first Earth photos and returned radiation data.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Juno II AM-19A And Explorer 7

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  PL-59-22397

13 October 1959

A very beautiful View of the Jupiter configuration with Explorer 7 onboard as it lifts off from Launch Complex 5 at the Cape.

Explorer 7 S-1 Spacecraft engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere or outer space and returned magnetic field and solar flare data.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Explorer 7 S-1 Spacecraft

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  PL-59-1842U

13 October 1959

A fine portrait of the Explorer 7 (S-1) satellite.

Explorer 7 S-1 Spacecraft engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere or outer space and returned magnetic field and solar flare data.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in good to very good condition.

 

After Explorer 7 there were over 50 more Explorer Spacecraft launches with the last one Launched from Vandenberg AFB on 6 December 1975 and was noted as Explorer 56 with Explorer Spacecraft DAD returning data on Dual Air Density and other air density experiments.

 

 

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Juno II AM-19B And Beacon 2

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No. PL-59-18585

14 August 1959

Pre-Launch activity at Pad 26B of the Jupiter launch vehicle and Beacon 2. This second attempt ended as a failure because the first stage shut down too early and the launch vehicle had no attitude control for its upper stages.

NASA with the Army as executive agent attempted to launch a 12-foot-diameter inflatable satellite of micro-thin plastic covered with aluminium foil known as BEACON.

Beacon 1 was launched by a modified Redstone and the payload (upper stages) separated prior to burnout and structural failure occurred after 149 sec into the flight due to vibration disturbances generated by the spinning payload.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Scout X SX-1

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

18 October 1959

The first Scout test vehicle to lift off from Wallops Island, with live first and third stages, on 18 October 1959 was filed as a failure. The Launch Vehicle broke up after first-stage burnout.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Pioneer 5 Weight & Balance Tests

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  PL-59-18581

8 April 1959

The Pioneer-5 Spacecraft is undergoing weight & balance tests in Hangar AA at the Cape.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Pioneer 5 Pre-Flight Checks

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  PL-59-34110

12 July 1959

The Pioneer-5 Spacecraft is seen mated with the dummy third stage on the Thor Able-IV Launch Vehicle at the top of the service gantry at Pad 17A.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Thor Able-IV #219 Shroud Hoisted For Mating

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

12 July 1959

The shroud that will protect the Pioneer-5 Spacecraft until it is released from the dummy third stage is seen being hoisted up at Pad A of Launch Complex 17 at the Cape.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Able-4 No. 219 And Pioneer-5

10  x  8  Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

11 March 1960

The Thor Able-4 stands ready for lift off with Pioneer-5 aboard the Delta configuration at Launch Complex 17A at the Cape. This Thor Delta configuration successfully launched Pioneer-5 on it cosmic journey.

This fine vintage colour NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Able-4 No. 219 Lift Off

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

11 March 1960

The Thor Able-4 is launched with Pioneer-5 aboard the Delta second stage at Launch Complex 17A at the Cape. This Thor Delta configuration successfully launched Pioneer-5 on it cosmic journey.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Able-4 No. 219 Lift Off  #2

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy USAF Photograph

NASA  No.  PL-60-52596

11 March 1960

The Thor Able-4 is launched with Pioneer-5 aboard the Delta second stage at Launch Complex 17A at the Cape. This Thor Delta configuration successfully launched Pioneer-5 on it cosmic journey.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in poor to good condition.

 

 

TIROS spacecraft were the beginning of a long series of polar-orbiting meteorological satellites. TIROS was followed by the TOS (TIROS Operational System) series, and then the ITOS (Improved TIROS) series, and later the NOAA series. TIROS spacecraft were developed by GSFC and managed by ESSA (Environmental Science Services Administration). The objective was to establish a global weather satellite system.

 

 

8.95

Thor Able-2 #148 And TIROS-1

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No. PL-60-52693

14 March 1960

Second stage erection at Pad 17A of the Thor Delta and Tiros-1. This modified Thor Delta configuration successfully launched the first Tiros Satellite into orbit on 1 April 1960.

TIROS-1 was a TV and Infrared Observation Satellite and it returned 22952 cloud cover photographs. The spacecraft was engaged in practical applications and the uses of space technology such as weather or communication.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Able-2 #148 And TIROS-1 Lift Off

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

1 April 1960

Lift off from Pad 17A at the Cape of the Thor Delta and Tiros-1. This modified Thor Delta configuration successfully launched the first Tiros Satellite into orbit on 1 April 1960.

TIROS-1 was a TV and Infrared Observation Satellite and it returned 22952 cloud cover photographs. The spacecraft was engaged in practical applications and the uses of space technology such as weather or communication.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in good condition. G-

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Thor Able-2 #148 And TIROS-1 Lift Off

10  x  8  Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

1 April 1960

Lift off from Pad 17A of the Thor Delta and Tiros-1. This modified Thor Delta configuration successfully launched the first Tiros Satellite into orbit on 1 April 1960.

TIROS-1 was a TV and Infrared Observation Satellite and it returned 22952 cloud cover photographs. The spacecraft was engaged in practical applications and the uses of space technology such as weather or communication.

This fine vintage colour glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

TIROS-3 And Hurricane Betsy

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  61-Tiros III-26

8 September 1961

Tiros III photographs Hurricane "Betsy" at 5:00 p.m. EDT September 7th at about 920 statute miles east of Hatteras, N.C. The eye of the hurricane is clearly visible and is approximately 200 miles in diameter. The surrounding mass of cyclonically swirling clouds which surround the eye extend several hundred miles. The centre of the eye was near 35 deg. North and 59 deg. West. This picture was relayed from Tiros III satellite and transmitted from the satellite to special receiving and readout equipment to NASA's Wallops Station, Va.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

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TIROS World's First Weather Satellite

10 x 8  Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  S-64-31386

Tiros was the very first weather satellite put in orbit. The term TIORS is an abbreviation for Television Infra-Red Observation Satellite.

This fine vintage NASA colour glossy photograph is in very good condition. Printed on heavy 'A Kodak Paper'.

 

 

 

 

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TIROS (TOS-G) ESSA-9

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  69-H-280

February 1969

The Tiros Operational Satellite (TOS-G) spacecraft is shown in final check-out prior to being placed atop the Delta Launch Vehicle. NASA successfully launched the ESSA-9 spacecraft from launch complex 17B at 2:47 EST, 26 Feb. 1969 for the Environmental Science Services Administration (ESSA).

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

NASA's  Echo  Project

Echo 1 and 1A were 30.5 m diameter balloons made of 0.0127 mm thick mylar polyester film. A set of 107.9-MHz beacon transmitters were carried for telemetry. The transmitters were powered by five nickel-cadmium batteries that were charged by 70 solar cells mounted on the balloon.

The Echo satellites were NASA's first experimental communications satellite project. Each spacecraft was a large metallized balloon designed to act as a passive communications reflector to bounce communication signals transmitted from one point on Earth to another.

Following the failure of the launch vehicle carrying Echo 1, Echo 1A (commonly referred to as Echo 1) was successfully orbited, and was used to redirect transcontinental and intercontinental telephone, radio, and television signals. The success of Echo 1A proved that microwave transmission to and from satellites in space was understood and demonstrated the promise of communications satellites. The vehicle also provided data for the calculation of atmospheric density and solar pressure due to its large area-to-mass ratio. Echo 1A was visible to the unaided eye over most of the Earth (brighter than most stars) and was probably seen by more people than any other man-made object in space. Echo 2 continued the passive communications experiments, and also investigated the dynamics of large spacecraft and was used for global geometric geodesy. Although NASA abandoned passive communications systems in favor of active satellites following Echo 2, the Echo systems demonstrated several ground station and tracking technologies that would be used by active systems. Echo 1A re-entered on May 24, 1968 followed by Echo 2 on June 7, 1969.

 

 

10.95

Thor-Delta #144 And Echo-1 Lift Off

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

13 May 1960

Just moments after ignition at Launch Complex 17A for the first Thor-Delta 3 Stage configuration. The payload is Echo-1, a 100-foot communications sphere. This first Echo/Delta launch failed because of second stage altitude control failure.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Three Stage Delta Launch Vehicle

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  60-E-2

August 1960

This drawing identifies major components of the three stage Delta Launch Vehicle used for NASA's Project Echo passive communications satellite. Prime contractor is Douglas Aircraft Company. The 92-foot Delta weighs 112,000 pounds fueled and develops 150,000 pounds thrust at lift-off.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Project Echo Satellite Preparations

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  L-60-4067

August 1960

NASA technicians at the Langley Research Centre prepare two Project Echo aluminium-coated plastic satellites. On the work table, each satellite is slightly more than 157 feet long. They will be compactly folded into metal payload containers 26.5 inches in diameter. The Satellite at right is in the early stages of folding and is held in place by 12-inch clothes pins. The satellite at left, further along in the intricate folding process, is being encased in a vinyl sleeve preparatory to the evacuation of bulk air trapped inside.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Project Echo Satellite Preparations #2

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  L-60-4068

August 1960

NASA technicians at the Langley Research Centre prepare a Project Echo aluminium-coated plastic satellite. A technician (background) checks a plastic cap which will be placed over the opening (foreground), sealing the ends of 82 flat gores fitted and cemented together to form the satellite. On the work table, the satellite - held in place by 12-inch clothes pins and partly obscured by a white vinyl covering - is slightly more than 157 feet long. It will be compactly folded into a metal payload container 26.5 inches in diameter.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Delta 270/D2 And Echo 1A

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  60-E2-1

12 August 1960

Echo 1A was boosted into Earth orbit at 5:39 a.m. EDT on 12 August 1960 by the Thor Delta from Launch Complex 17 Pad A at the Cape. The Delta Launch Vehicle is seen venting its liquid oxygen prior to launch.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Echo-1A  Flight Chart

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

1960

A fine glossy photographic reproduction of ECHO-1's flight path for the first 24 hours after orbit injection. Each line indicates its path per hour and are numbered accordingly. Altitude 900 nautical miles - Inclination 48 deg. of normal orbit.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Single Stage Thor Echo Test Flight

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  62-E2-4

7 January 1962

The single stage Thor booster waits in gantry 17B for the arrival of the 135-foot rigidized inflatable sphere. This test is to evaluate the inflation system of the 500-pound sphere prior to orbital launch as a passive communication satellite. The 30 minute flight will take the balloon to an expected peak altitude of 950 statute miles and re-enter the atmosphere 600 statute miles off the east coast of Florida.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Atlas Agena A 29D And Midas I

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No. PL-60-51889

26 February 1960

Pre-launch activity at Launch Complex 14 for the Atlas LV-3A Agena A configuration with Midas I as a payload is seen on launch day. The second stage failed to separate and this was logged as a failure.

Midas I is the first NASA Missile Defence Early Warning Satellite. First tested onboard a Thor Agena B launched from Vandenberg in December 1960 with IR sensors but did not carry its camera or film capsule.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Atlas Agena A 45D And Midas II Mating

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

May 1960

A fine view of the Agena A 1007 with Midas II as its payload being hoisted for mating with the Atlas 45D booster at Launch Complex 14. Midas II is a Early Warning Missile Defence Alarm System satellite with W-17 sensors.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Atlas Agena A 45D And Midas II

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No. PL-60-54756

24 May 1960

Atlas LV-3A Agena A configuration with Midas II as a payload is seen lifting off from Launch Complex 14. This was a successful test launch and placed the Defence Alarm System with W-17 sensors in orbit. Midas II remained in Earth orbit until July 1974.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Able-Star No. 293 And Courier-1B

10  x  8  Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

4 October 1960

The Thor Able-Star lifts off from Launch Complex 17B with Courier-1B onboard.

Courier was a experimental communications satellite and two were launched by the Thor Able-Star launch Vehicle. Courier 1A was launched 18 August 1960 but exploded 2.5 minutes after lift off.

This very fine vintage colour NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Explorer 8 During Vibration Tests

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No. 60-EX-3VIII

October 1960

Technicians of the Marshall Space Flight Centre subject the Ionosphere Direct Measurement Satellite, Explorer 8 (S-30), to a vibration test. The satellite houses eight experiments designed and built by the Goddard Space Flight Centre, weighs 90 pounds and will be launched into an elliptical orbit from the Cape by a Juno II launch vehicle.

Explorer 8 (S-30) Lifted off from Launch Complex 26B at the Cape on the 3 November 1960 at 5:23 GMT onboard a Juno II AM-19D Launch vehicle.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Explorer 8 Instrument Column

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No. 60-EX-4VIII

October 1960

The instrument column of the Ionosphere Direct Measurement Satellite (S-30) is lowered into its housing by a technician of the Marshall Space Flight Centre. The column, 19-1/2 inches long, consists of 20 modules housing the transmitter, command receiver, amplifier, counters, and other units.

Explorer 8 (S-30) Lifted off from Launch Complex 26B at the Cape on the 3 November 1960 at 5:23 GMT onboard a Juno II AM-19D Launch vehicle.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in good to very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

3.95

Explorer 8 Concept

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No. 60-EX-2VIII

October 1960

A drawing  of the Ionosphere Direct Measurement Satellite (S-30) shows location of the eight experiments designed and built by the Goddard Space Flight Centre.

The satellite weighs 90 pounds and is 30 inches high and 30 inches in diameter.

Explorer 8 (S-30) Lifted off from Launch Complex 26B at the Cape on the 3 November 1960 at 5:23 GMT onboard a Juno II AM-19D Launch vehicle.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in good to very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thor Delta 312/D6 And Explorer 12

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO. Lod 61-6900

15 August 1961

A beautiful night view at Launch Complex 17A at the Cape as the Delta LV vents while loxing during pre-launch activity. The Delta 312 / D6 was launched on 16 August 1961 with Explorer 12 onboard.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

S-15 Mating With Juno II

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO. 61-Juno IIB-4

27 March 1961

Here S-15 is lowered into the shroud covering the upper stages of a Juno II test vehicle at the Marshall Centre, where it is spun to check radio frequency and telemetering reception. The Marshall Space Flight Centre will provide and launch the Juno II rocket, which is composed of a modified Jupiter missile originally developed by MSFC employees and four solid-propellant upper stages furnished by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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Jupiter AM-19E And S-15 (Explorer 11)

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO. 61-Juno II-28

27 April 1961

Lift-off of the Juno II - Jupiter AM-19E Launch Vehicle with S-15 onboard from the Cape's Launch Complex 26 Pad B.

S-15 a 95 pound experiment designed to transmit information about the structure of the ionosphere, called S-15. It was successfully launched at 9:17 a.m. EST from the Cape and all four stages fired as planned.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

S-45 Iconospher Beacon Satellite

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO. 61-Juno IIA-3

May 1961

Explorer S-45 is a 72-pound P-14 class satellite.

The top cover of the S-45 Iconsaphere Beacon Satellite is lowered into place during assembly of the payload.

Two attempts were made to put this Explorer satellite into Earth orbit. The first attempt was on 25 February 1961 onboard the JUNO II AM-19F Jupiter Launch Vehicle from LC26B at the Cape. This ended in failure as the third stage failed to ignite.

The second attempt to launch the Explorer S-45A was on 24 May 1961 onboard the JUNO II AM-19G Jupiter Launch Vehicle from LC26B at the Cape. This also ended in failure as the second stage failed to ignite.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

S-45 Iconospher Beacon Satellite #2

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO. 61-Juno IIA-2

May 1961

Explorer S-45 a 72-pound P-14 class satellite.

Exterior view of the S-45 Iconsaphere Beacon Satellite.

Two attempts were made to put this Explorer satellite into Earth orbit. The first attempt was on 25 February 1961 onboard the JUNO II AM-19F Jupiter Launch Vehicle from LC26B at the Cape. This ended in failure as the third stage failed to ignite.

The second attempt to launch the Explorer S-45A was on 24 May 1961 onboard the JUNO II AM-19G Jupiter Launch Vehicle from LC26B at the Cape. This also ended in failure as the second stage failed to ignite.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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S-45 Iconospher Beacon Satellite #3

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO. Lod-61-5139

23 May 1961

Explorer S-45 is a 72-pound P-14 class satellite.

This is a photograph of the actual satellite taken with special effects.

Two attempts were made to put this Explorer satellite into Earth orbit. The first attempt was on 25 February 1961 onboard the JUNO II AM-19F Jupiter Launch Vehicle from LC26B at the Cape. This ended in failure as the third stage failed to ignite.

The second attempt to launch the Explorer S-45A was on 24 May 1961 onboard the JUNO II AM-19G Jupiter Launch Vehicle from LC26B at the Cape. This also ended in failure as the second stage failed to ignite.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.95

S-45 Iconospher Beacon Satellite #4

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO. 61-Juno IIA-1

May 1961

Explorer S-45 is a 72-pound P-14 class satellite.

Artiest concept of the S-45 Iconsaphere Beacon Satellite in orbit around the Earth.

Two attempts were made to put this Explorer satellite into Earth orbit. The first attempt was on 25 February 1961 onboard the JUNO II AM-19F Jupiter Launch Vehicle from LC26B at the Cape. This ended in failure as the third stage failed to ignite.

The second attempt to launch the Explorer S-45A was on 24 May 1961 onboard the JUNO II AM-19G Jupiter Launch Vehicle from LC26B at the Cape. This also ended in failure as the second stage failed to ignite.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Atlas Centaur AC-1 In Service Structure

10 x 8  Black & White Glossy Photograph

NASA No.  Lod-61-3586

5 May 1961

A striking view of the first Atlas Centaur, variously denoted "C-1" or "F-1", stands in the Service Structure at the new Launch Complex 36A at the Cape.  It stood here for 15 months before finally lifting off on 8 May 1962.  The vehicle rose cleanly and steered downrange, but 49 seconds after lift off a portion of one of four Centaur LH2 tank "weather shield" insulating panels ripped away.  The LH2 fuel tank quickly overheated, over-pressurized, and failed, shredding the Centaur stage and, rapidly thereafter, destroying the entire Atlas vehicle about 55 seconds after lift off.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is good condition. G-

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Atlas Centaur AC-1 Launch Vehicle

10 x 8  Black & White Glossy Photograph

NASA No.  62-C-7

27 March 1962

The first Atlas Centaur, variously denoted "C-1" or "F-1", stands at the new Launch Complex 36A at Cape Canaveral.  It stood here for 15 months before finally lifting off on 8 May 1962.  The vehicle rose cleanly and steered downrange, but 49 seconds after lift off a portion of one of four Centaur LH2 tank "weather shield" insulating panels ripped away.  The LH2 fuel tank quickly overheated, over-pressurized, and failed, shredding the Centaur stage and, rapidly thereafter, destroying the entire Atlas vehicle about 55 seconds after lift off.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Thor Delta D15 And Relay I

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  62-Relay-23

11 December 1962

Erection and mating at Pad 17 of the second stage of this Delta configuration. The increased propellant tank capacity of this second stage will extend the burning time from 109 seconds to approximately 160 seconds. This increase adds 3 feet to the length of the Aerojet General second stage 7,500 lb. thrust engine. This Thor Delta D15 will launch the first Relay active communications satellite on 13 December 1962.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in good condition. G-

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Relay I Spacecraft

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.   62-Relay-18

11 December 1962

The 172-pound spacecraft eight-sided prism is 33 inches high and 29 inches in diameter at its broad end. The exterior composed of eight honeycomb aluminium panels studded with 8,215 solar coils. The communication satellite prime function was to be used for technical experiments, although public demonstrations of television, telephone calls, teletype photo facsimile, and high speed data will be transmitted.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

S-6 Spacecraft Explorer 17

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

26 March 1963

A wonderful portrait of the S-6 Spacecraft (Explorer 17) at Goddard Space Flight Centre.

This 400 pound stainless steel satellite will be placed into a 155 mile Earth orbit by a Delta Launch Vehicle. It will travel at five miles a second, in earth orbit, with its eight primary detectors that will make direct measurements of the structure of the Earth's upper atmosphere.

The S-6 Spacecraft (Explorer 17) was placed in orbit on 3 April 1963 from LC17A at the Cape onboard a Thor Delta B 357 launch vehicle where it will engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

S-6 Experiments Check Out

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

26 March 1963

The S-6 spherically shaped 400-pound stainless steel satellite is having its experiment package checked out by the Goddard Spacecraft Technology Division prior to being shipped to the Cape.

The S-6 Spacecraft (Explorer 17) was placed in a 155 mile orbit on 3 April 1963 from LC17A at the Cape onboard a Thor Delta B 357 launch vehicle where it will engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

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S-6 Undergoing Electrical Checks

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  63-S6-2

26 March 1963

The S-6 is a 400 pound stainless steel satellite designed for basic research in studying the physics and chemistry of the upper atmosphere. This picture shows the payload undergoing electrical check outs at Goddard Space Flight Centre prior to shipment to the Cape for launch. The Spacecraft will carry eight primary detectors that will measure atmospheric pressure, densities and temperatures.

The S-6 Spacecraft (Explorer 17) was placed in a 155 mile orbit on 3 April 1963 from LC17A at the Cape onboard a Thor Delta B 357 launch vehicle where it will engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

S-6 Weight And Balance Checks

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  63-S6-3

26 March 1963

The S-6 is a 400 pound stainless steel satellite designed for basic research in studying the physics and chemistry of the upper atmosphere. Here the payload is subjected to the weight and balance machine at Goddard Space Flight Centre prior to shipment to the Cape for launch.

The S-6 Spacecraft (Explorer 17) was placed in a 155 mile orbit on 3 April 1963 from LC17A at the Cape onboard a Thor Delta B 357 launch vehicle where it will engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

S-6 Undergoes Spin Test

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  63-S6-4

26 March 1963

The S-6 spherically shaped 400-pound satellite undergoes spin test prior to shipment to the Cape. Most of the work was done on the spacecraft by the Goddard Spacecraft Technology Division. Useful lifetime of the satellite will be between two and three months.

The S-6 Spacecraft (Explorer 17) was placed in a 155 mile orbit on 3 April 1963 from LC17A at the Cape onboard a Thor Delta B 357 launch vehicle where it will engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

S-6 Readied For Its Trip To The Cape

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  63-S6-1

26 March 1963

The S-6 spacecraft is being prepared for its trip to Cape Canaveral from the Goddard Space Flight Centre.

The S-6 Spacecraft (Explorer 17) was placed in a 155 mile orbit on 3 April 1963 from LC17A at the Cape onboard a Thor Delta B 357 launch vehicle where it will engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

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S-6 Arrival At The Cape

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

March 1963

The S-6 spacecraft is seen on the Capes Skid Strip being off loaded onto a hand transporter.

The S-6 Spacecraft (Explorer 17) was placed in a 155 mile orbit on 3 April 1963 from LC17A at the Cape onboard a Thor Delta B 357 launch vehicle where it will engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in good to very good condition

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

S-6 Undergoes Final Check Out

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  63-S6-5

26 March 1963

The S-6 spacecraft a 400-pound stainless steel satellite undergoes final checks at Cape Canaveral before mating to the Delta Launch Vehicle.

The S-6 Spacecraft (Explorer 17) was placed in a 155 mile orbit on 3 April 1963 from LC17A at the Cape onboard a Thor Delta B 357 launch vehicle where it will engaged in research and exploration of the upper atmosphere.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

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Atlas Agena B and Midas 9

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  KN-7324

19 July 1963

LV: Atlas Agena B 75D / Agena B S01 1207

Lift Off From Vandenberg AFB, California on 19 July 1963 with the following payloads:

Midas 9 - Early warning satellite

TRS 4 - Navigation technology satellite

TRS 10 - Magnetosphere satellite

Dash 2 - Military technology satellite

This fine 1970's reissued NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

JPL's Operations Control Center

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  64-H-2027

1964

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

Operations Control Center in Space Flight Operations Facility (SFOF). In foreground is information coordination center. Top row of consoles control two IBM 7094 computer systems located in the SFOF. Row of consoles at left are manned by representatives of the technical areas in SFOF that support the Operations Control Center.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Beacon Explorer 20 S-66

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  64-BE-A2

15 March 1964

The Beacon Explorer 20 solar powered satellite, also know as S-66, undergoes check out at Launch Complex 17 at the Cape. 81 becon observation stations located in 33 countries will participate in gathering data on the ionosphere from the satellite.

Explorer 20 (S-66) was launched from LC17A at the Cape at 11:13 GMT on 19 March 1964 onboard the Thor Delta B 391/D24 launch vehicle. It was logged as a failure due to insufficient third stage thrust.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Beacon Explorer 20 Solar Panel Checks

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  KSC-64-9299

15 March 1964

The Beacon Explorer 20, with its solar panels extended, undergoes check out at Launch Complex 17A at the Cape prior to mating to the Delta B 391 launch vehicle. NASA will attempt to place the spacecraft into a near-polar orbit to measure ionosphere electron densities between its 750-mile high programmed orbit and the Earth.

Explorer 20 (S-66) was launched from LC17A at the Cape at 11:13 GMT on 19 March 1964 onboard the Thor Delta B 391/D24 launch vehicle. It was logged as a failure due to insufficient third stage thrust.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD-

Beacon Explorer 20 Solar Panel Checks  #2

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  64-BE-A4

15 March 1964

The Beacon Explorer 20, with its solar panels extended, undergoes check out at Launch Complex 17A at the Cape prior to mating to the Delta B 391 launch vehicle. NASA will attempt to place the spacecraft into a near-polar orbit to measure ionosphere electron densities between its 750-mile high programmed orbit and the Earth.

Explorer 20 (S-66) was launched from LC17A at the Cape at 11:13 GMT on 19 March 1964 onboard the Thor Delta B 391/D24 launch vehicle. It was logged as a failure due to insufficient third stage thrust.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

12.95

Atlas LV-3A Agena B And Ranger 7

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  64-Ranger-B-16

28 July 1964

Ranger B (7) was launched from the Cape's Launch Complex 12 at 12:50 EDT on 28 July 1964 onboard a Atlas LV-3A Agena B Launch Vehicle.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition. VG++

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD  For   12.95  

SOLD

Atlas LV-3A Agena B & Ranger 8

10 x  8   Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

17 February 1965

The Atlas LV3 Agena B lifts off from Launch Complex 12 at the Cape at 12:07 p.m. with the Ranager-C spacecraft onboard. If successful it will be named Ranger-8 after being placed in Earth orbit.

This very fine vintage NASA colour glossy photograph is in very good condition and printed on A Kodak Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  8.95

SOLD

Delta TAD 417 And SYNCOM-C 

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.   64-Syncom-C7

9 August 1964

Complex 17-A. The Thrust Augmented Delta (TAD) which NASA will use to place the Synocom C spacecraft in orbit, is shown after mating and alignment of solid stage motors. This will be the first launch of the TAD. It was chosen for the S yncom mission because of its extra power necessary to boost the satellite into a 22,300 mile equatorial orbit over the Pacific Ocean.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Delta TAD 417 And SYNCOM-C 

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.   64-Syncom-C7

9 August 1964

Same as the above photo with a U.S. 5 cent stamp Cancelled by the U.S. Post Office, Cape Canaveral on 19 August 1964. Just a few days after the photograph was taken.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  8.95

SOLD

Delta TAD 417 SYNCOM-C Mating

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.   64-Syncom-C8

9 August 1964

Complex 17-A. The Thrust Augmented Delta (TAD) which NASA will use to place the Synocom C spacecraft in orbit, is shown after mating and alignment of solid stage motors. This will be the first launch of the TAD. It was chosen for the S yncom mission because of its extra power necessary to boost the satellite into a 22,300 mile equatorial orbit over the Pacific Ocean.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  8.95

SOLD

Delta TAD 417 And SYNCOM-C #2

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.   64-Syncom-C9

9 August 1964

Complex 17-A. The Thrust Augmented Delta (TAD) which NASA will use to place the Synocom C spacecraft in orbit, is shown after mating and alignment of solid stage motors. This will be the first launch of the TAD. It was chosen for the Syncom mission because of its extra power necessary to boost the satellite into a 22,300 mile equatorial orbit over the Pacific Ocean.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  4.95

SOLD

Relay II Communications Satellite

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

USAF No.   64-Relay II-8

January 1964

Goddard Space Flight Centre - Relay II communications satellite undergoes vibration test prior to shipment to Cape Kennedy. The 172-pound spacecraft will be launched into Earth orbit by the Thor Delta 26 launch vehicle.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  8.95

SOLD

Thor Delta 26 And Relay II

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.   102-KSC-64-6072

25 September 1964

A fine view from the gantry of the Thor Delta 26 as it is poised for launch at Pad 17A. This Delta configuration will carry the Relay II communications satellite into Earth orbit.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD-

Atlas Agena B 195D  &  OGO-1  At LC 12

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  101-KSC-64-15064

29 August 1964

A fine view of pre-launch activity at Launch Complex 12 with a technician at the top of the light pole as he attempts to tie it down. One of the many steps that must be taken to secure Pad 12 for the launching of the Atlas Agena B 195D (AA10) / Agena B 6501 (AS10) with the OGO-1 spacecraft as its payload.

The purpose of the six Orbiting Geophysical Observatories (OGO) was to conduct diversified geophysical experiments to obtain a better understanding of the earth as a planet and to develop and operate a standardized observatory-type satellite.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

OGO-1  -  Launched on 5 September 1964 From LC12 At the Cape

Onboard Atlas Agena B 195D Launch Vehicle

Two experiment booms failed to properly deploy, with one of the booms obscuring a horizon scanner's view of earth. As a result, the spacecraft attitude could not be earth oriented and OGO 1 remained spin stabilized at 5 rpm. Nevertheless, data from all 20 experiments on board was received, although at a 'less than expected capacity' from some of them. Twelve of the experiemnts were particle studies and two were magnetic field studies. In addition, there was one experiment for each of the following types of studies: interplanetary dust, VLF, Lyman-alpha, Gegenschein, atmospheric mass, and radio astronomy. During September 1964, acceptable data were received over 70% of the orbital path. By June 1969, data acquisition was limited to 10% of the orbital path. Spacecraft operation was restricted to Spring and Fall due to power supply limitations. There were 11 such 3-month periods prior to the spacecraft being put into stand-by mode on 25 November 1969. By April 1970 the spacecraft perigee had increased to 46,000 km and the inclination had increased to 58.8 deg. All support was terminated November 1, 1971.

 

 

 

 

SOLD-

AC-4 Booster Unloads at KSC

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  101-KSC-64-15064

23 July 1964

The NASA Atlas/Centaur 4 (AC-4) booster being unloaded on the KSC Skid Strip.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For   8.95

SOLD

AC-4 Booster Arrives at Hanger H

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  101-KSC-64-15065

23 July 1964

The NASA Atlas/Centaur 4 (AC-4) booster arrives at Hanger H at KSC.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  14.95  

SOLD

Atlas Centaur (AC-4)  In Hanger H

10 x  8   Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

July 1964

A brilliant colour view of the AC-4 inside Hanger H as it is prepared to be delivered to Launch Complex 36A at the Cape. 

This very fine vintage NASA colour glossy photograph is in near mint condition and printed on 'A Kodak Paper'.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD-

Atlas Centaur AC-4 With Dummy Surveyor

10  x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  101-KSC-64C-5743

11 December 1964

A wonderful view from behind the spotlight of the Atlas Centaur AC-4 sitting on the pad at Launch Complex 36A just prior to lift off.

AC-4 was to perform the first RL10A-3 restart in space. Centaur, which carried a 952 kg pound dummy Surveyor payload, performed a successful first burn to put itself into a 165 x 178 km x 30.7 degree geosynchronous transfer orbit.  After a 25 minute coast, however, Centaur's engines failed to restart, preventing the stage from reaching its planned 160 x 8,000 km final orbit. 

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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