Mercury Testing

A  Brief History

Original Vintage NASA Photographs

Last Update   12 November 2013

 

Click here to return to get back HOME

HOME

Click here to return to  Mercury Home Page

Back to Mercury Home Page

Click here to return to the Main Gallery Home Page

Back To Main Gallery

 

1956

1 February 1956 - USAF RFP - Manned Ballistic Rocket Research System:  USAF issues request for industry proposals for Project 7969 Manned Ballistic Rocket Research System for a two year study period.

3 May 1956 - Convair announced as the prime contractor for the Atlas:  The Air Force disclosed that a $41 million guided missile production facility would be built at Sorrento, California, for the Atlas launch vehicle. Convair was announced as the prime contractor.

 

1957

14 October 1957 - National space flight program proposed:  The Rocket and Satellite Research Panel, established in 1946 as the V-2 Upper Atmosphere Research Panel and renamed the Upper Atmosphere Rocket Research Panel in 1948, together with the American Rocket Society proposed a national space flight program and a unified National Space Establishment. The mission of such an Establishment would be non-military in nature, specifically excluding space weapons development and military operations in space. By 1959, this Establishment should have achieved an unmanned instrumented hard lunar landing and, by 1960, an unmanned instrumented lunar satellite and soft lunar landing. Manned circumnavigation of the moon with return to earth should have been accomplished by 1965 with a manned lunar landing mission taking place by 1968. Beginning in 1970, a permanent lunar base should be possible.

8 November 1957 - Von Braun ordered to launch satellite:  Secretary of Defence Neil McElroy directed the Army to proceed with the launching of the Explorer earth satellites. This order, in effect, resumed the Orbiter project that had been eliminated from the IGY satellite planning program on September 9, 1955. Von Braun was to modify two Jupiter-C missiles (modified Redstones) and attempt to place an artificial earth satellite in orbit by March 1958.

 

1958

15 January 1958 - Eleven proposals for Project 7969 initial manned spacecraft:  The Air Force received 11 unsolicited industry proposals for Project 7969, and technical evaluation was started. Observers from NACA participated.

29-31 January 1958 - Conference reviews concepts for manned orbital vehicles:  A conference was held at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, to review concepts for manned orbital vehicles. The NACA informally presented two concepts then under study at Langley Aeronautical Laboratory: the one proposed by Maxime A. Faget involved a ballistic, high-drag capsule with heat shield on which the pilot lies prone during re-entry, with re*entry being accomplished by reverse thrust at the apogee of the elliptical orbit involving a deceleration load of about 8g's, and proceeding to impact by a parachute landing; the other Langley proposal called for the development of a triangular platform vehicle with a flat bottom having some lift during re-entry.

24 September 1958 - Basic plan for a manned satellite program:  A series of meetings were held in Washington, with Robert R. Gilruth serving as chairman to draft a manned satellite program and provide a basic plan for meeting the objectives of this program. Others attending included S. B. Batdorf, A. J. Eggers, Maxime A. Faget, George Low, Warren North, Walter C. Williams, and Robert C. Youngquist.

1 October 1958 - NASA Was Created: NASA was activated in accordance with the terms of Public Law 85-568, and the non-military space projects which had been conducted by the Advanced Research Projects Agency were transferred to the jurisdiction of the NASA. Concurrently, NACA, after a 43-year tenure, was inactivated, and its facilities and personnel became a part of NASA.

7 October 1958 - Project Mercury organized: NASA formally organized Project Mercury to: (1) place manned space capsule in orbital flight around the earth; (2) investigate man's reactions to and capabilities in this environment; and (3) recover capsule and pilot safely. A NASA Space Task Group organized at Langley Research Centre drew up specifications for the Mercury capsule, based on studies by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics during the preceding 12 months, and on discussions with the Air Force which had been conducting related studies.

17 October 1958 - Negotiations for Mercury Atlas launch vehicles:   Langley Research Centre personnel visited the Air Force Ballistic Missile Division, Inglewood, California, to open negotiations for procuring Atlas launch vehicles for the manned satellite project.

24 November 1958 - Space Task Group orders first Mercury Atlas missile:  The Space Task Group placed an order for one Atlas launch vehicle with the Air Force Missile Division, Inglewood, California, as part of a preliminary research program leading to manned space flight. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Headquarters requested that the Air Force construct and launch one Atlas C launch vehicle to check the aerodynamics of the spacecraft. It was the intention to launch this missile about May 1959 in a ballistic trajectory. This was to be the launch vehicle for the Big Joe re-entry test shot, but plans were later changed and an Atlas Model D launch vehicle was used instead.

1958 November 26 - Project Mercury named:  Project Mercury, U.S. manned-satellite program, was officially named by NASA

8 December 1958 - Nine Atlas launch vehicles required for Project Mercury:  The Space Task Group indicated that nine Atlas launch vehicles were required in support of the Project Mercury manned and unmanned flights and these were ordered from the Air Force Ballistic Missile Division.

9 December 1958 - Mercury astronaut selection procedure:  An aeromedical selection team composed of Major Stanley C. White, Air Force; Lt. Robert B. Voas, Navy; and Captain William Augerson, Army, drafted a tentative astronaut selection procedure. According to the plan, representatives from the services and industry would nominate 150 men by January 21, 1959; 36 of these would be selected for further testing which would reduce the group to 12; and in a 9-month training period, a hard core of 6 men would remain. At the end of December 1958, this plan was rejected.

 

1959

2 January 1959 - Von Braun predicted manned circumlunar flight within ten years:  In a staff report of the House Select Committee on Astronautics and Space Exploration, Wernher von Braun of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency predicted manned circumlunar flight within the next eight to ten years and a manned lunar landing and return mission a few years thereafter. Administrator T. Keith Glennan, Deputy Administrator Hugh L. Dryden, Abe Silverstein, John P. Hagen, and Homer E. Newell, all of NASA, also foresaw manned circumlunar flight within the decade as well as instrumented probes soft-landed on the moon. Roy K. Knutson, Chairman of the Corporate Space Committee, NAA, projected a manned lunar landing expedition for the early 1970's with extensive unmanned instrumented soft lunar landings during the last half of the 1960's.

February 1959 - NASA/USAF responsibilities for the first two Mercury Atlas firings:  During a meeting between personnel of the Space Task Group and the Air Force Ballistic Missile Division, the responsibilities of the two organizations were outlined for the first two Atlas firings. Space Technology Laboratories, under Air Force Ballistic Missile Division direction, would select the design trajectories according to the specifications set forth by the Space Task Group. These specifications were to match a point in the trajectory at about 450,000 feet, corresponding to a normal re-entry condition for the manned spacecraft after firing of the retrorockets at an altitude of 120 nautical miles. Space Technology Laboratories would also provide impact dispersion data, data for range safety purposes, and the necessary re-programming of the guidance computers. The spacecraft for the suborbital Atlas flights would be manufactured under the direction of the Lewis Research Centre, based on Space Task Group designs. Space Task Group was developing the spacecraft instrumentation, with a contingent of personnel at the Lewis Research Centre. The attitude control system was being developed by Lewis.

12 - 13 February 1959 - Atlas launch vehicles in Project Mercury:  Discussions were held at Langley Field between the Space Task Group and the Air Force Ballistic Missile Division covering aspects of the use of Atlas launch vehicles in Project Mercury. Specifically discussed were technical details of the first Atlas test flight (Big Joe), the abort sensing capability for later flights, and overall program objectives.

2 April 1959 - Seven astronauts selected for Mercury project:  Seven astronauts were selected for Project Mercury after a series of the most rigorous physical and mental tests ever given to U.S. test pilots. Chosen from a field of 110 candidates, the finalists were all qualified test pilots: Capts. Leroy G. Cooper, Jr., Virgil I. Grissom, and Donald K. Slayton, (USAF); Lt. Malcolm S. Carpenter, Lt. Comdr. Alan B. Shepard, Jr., and Lt. Comdr. Watler M. Schirra, Jr. (USN); and Lt. Col. John H. Glenn (USMC).

27 April 1959 - Project Mercury astronauts reported for duty:

 

5 June 1959 - Flight instrumentation necessary to support the Mercury-Atlas program. -  Space Technology Laboratories and Convair completed an analysis of flight instrumentation necessary to support the Mercury-Atlas program. The primary objective of the study was to select a light-weight telemetry system. A system weighing 270 pounds was recommended, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration concurred with the proposal.

 

12 July 1959 - Instrumentation to measure noise level during the Mercury Big Joe-Atlas launching:  An agreement was made with the Air Force for Space Task Group to place microphone pickups on the skin of the Atlas launch vehicle as a part of the instrumentation to measure noise level during the Big Joe-Atlas launching. Distribution of the microphones was as follows: one inside the Mercury spacecraft, three externally about midway of the launch vehicle, and one on the Atlas skirt.

14 August 1959 - Negotiations for the fabrication of six additional Mercury spacecraft:  NASA Headquarters approved a Space Task Group proposal that negotiations be undertaken with McDonnell for the fabrication of six additional Mercury spacecraft.

15 August 1959 - Mercury astronauts began their initial centrifuge training:  The astronauts began their initial centrifuge training at the Aviation Medical Acceleration Laboratory. During the first part of the month Space Task Group personnel had installed and checked out Mercury spacecraft simulation equipment at the Aviation Medical Acceleration Laboratory in preparation for the astronaut centrifuge training program.

28 August 1959 - Additional Atlas launch vehicles in support of Project Mercury:  NASA Headquarters authorized the Space Task Group to enter into negotiations with the Air Force Ballistic Missile Division for the procurement of additional Atlas launch vehicles in support of Project Mercury. The authorization was to be incorporated into Contract No. HS-36.

 

2 November 1959 -  Planning of advanced spacecraft systems begun:  

At an STG meeting, it was decided to begin planning of advanced spacecraft systems. Three primary assignments were made:

  1. The preliminary design of a multi-man (probably three-man) capsule for a circumlunar mission, with particular attention to the use of the capsule as a temporary space laboratory, lunar landing cabin, and deep-space probe;
  2. Mission analysis studies to establish exit and re-entry corridors, weights, and propulsion requirements;
  3. Test program planning to decide on the number and purpose of launches.

Participants in the meeting were Director Robert R. Gilruth, Paul E. Purser, Charles J. Donlan, Maxime A. Faget, Robert O. Piland, H. Kurt Strass, Charles W. Mathews, John D. Hodge, James A. Chamberlin, and Caldwell C. Johnson. A panel composed of Piland, Strass, Hodge, and Johnson was appointed to carry out the assignments. The ground rules given to the panel, which was responsible to the Director's office, were:

- Use personnel necessary to accomplish the work, but do not slow down Mercury;

- As many as 30 persons (10 percent of the STG staff) might possibly be used in the future.

 

 

 

8.95

Mercury Capsule Mating To Big Joe

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  PL-59-18438

10 August 1959

NASA's  Mercury boilerplate spacecraft is seen being mated to the Mercury Atlas 628 10D at Cape Canaveral. This flight is to test and validate the Mercury concept of capsule re-entry and was named Big Joe, first booster flight of the Mercury program.

A very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Mercury Capsule Mating To Big Joe  #2

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  PL-59-18476

10 August 1959

High gantry view of the  Mercury boilerplate spacecraft is being mated to the Mercury Atlas 628 10D at Cape Canaveral. This flight is to test and validate the Mercury concept of capsule re-entry and was named Big Joe, first booster flight of the Mercury program.

A very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Big Joe Pre-Launch Activity

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  B-59-771

August 1959

A nice close up of Big Joe on Pad 14 at the Cape.

Mercury Atlas 628 10D Booster.

A fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Mercury Big Joe On Pad 14

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  PL-59-18623

10 August 1959

Here is a wonderful over all view at Launch Complex 14 of the Atlas 628 10D with the Mercury boilerplate spacecraft as a payload at the Cape. This flight was to test and validate the Mercury concept of capsule re-entry and was named Big Joe, first booster flight of the Mercury program.

A very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.95

Convair Atlas 628 10-D At Night

Big Joe At Night

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  B-59-776

8 September 1959

The night before launch at Pad 14, Big Joe, Mercury Missile 628 (10D) has the Mercury Boilerplate spacecraft installed on top and is ready for flight. The spacecraft was launched on 9 September 1959 from Cape Canaveral for a test validation of the Mercury concept.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Convair Atlas 10-D At Night  #2

Big Joe At Night

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

8 September 1959

The night before launch at Pad 14, Big Joe, Mercury Missile 628 (10D) has the Mercury Boilerplate spacecraft installed on top and is ready for flight. The spacecraft was launched on 9 September 1959 from Cape Canaveral for a test validation of the Mercury concept.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Big Joe Ready To Launch

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

9 September 1959

NASA  No.  PL-59-19402

Big Joe ready for launch from Pad 14 at Cape Canaveral. The objective of "Big Joe" was to test the ablating heat-shield. The flight was both a success and failure the heat-shield survived re-entry and was in remarkably good condition when retrieved from the Atlantic. The Atlas-D booster, however, failed to stage and separated too late from the Mercury capsule.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Big Joe Lift Off

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

9 September 1959

NASA  No.  PL-59-22308

Big Joe lifts off from Pad 14 at the Cape. The objective of "Big Joe" was to test the ablating heat-shield. The flight was both a success and failure the heat-shield survived re-entry and was in remarkably good condition when retrieved from the Atlantic. The Atlas-D booster, however, failed to stage and separated too late from the Mercury capsule.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Big Joe Lift Off  #2

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

9 September 1959

NASA  No.  PL-59-22307

Big Joe lifts off from Pad 14 at the Cape. The objective of "Big Joe" was to test the ablating heat-shield. The flight was both a success and failure the heat-shield survived re-entry and was in remarkably good condition when retrieved from the Atlantic. The Atlas-D booster, however, failed to stage and separated too late from the Mercury capsule.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Big Joe Lift Off  #3

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No. PL-59-19404

9 September 1959

NASA boilerplate model of Mercury capsule successfully launched on the Atlas 10D named Big Joe. It was recovered in the South Atlantic after surviving re-entry heat of more than 10,000F.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  6.95

SOLD

Little Joe 1A Low Altitude Abort Test

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

4 November 1959

Launching of the Little Joe 1A launch vehicle on November 4, 1959 took place at Wallops Island, Va. The ring-sail parachute lands the spacecraft off the shore of Wallops Island, Virginia. The Little Joe rocket booster was developed as a cheaper, smaller, and more functional alternative to the Redstone rockets. Little Joe could be produced at one-fifth the cost of Redstone rockets and still have enough power to carry a capsule payload. Seven unmanned Little Joe rockets were launched at Wallops Island, Virginia, from August 1959 to April 1961.

This vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

18 January 1960 - Mercury-Atlas flight test working group to become a standing coordination body:  A proposal was made by Walter C. Williams, Associate Director of Project Mercury Operations, that the Mercury-Atlas flight test working group become an official and standing coordination body. This group brought together representation from the Space Task Group, Air Force Ballistic Missile Division, Convair Astronautics, McDonnell Aircraft Corporation, and the Atlantic Missile Range. Personnel from these organizations had met informally in the past on several occasions.

21 January 1960 - 15 Atlas launch vehicles and 26 Mercury spacecraft purchased:  At a meeting to draft fiscal year 1962 funding estimates, the total purchase of Atlas launch vehicles was listed as 15, and the total purchase of Mercury spacecraft was listed as 26.

21 January 1960 - Little Joe Spacecraft Test mission:  Little Joe 1-B (LJ-1B) was launched from Wallops Island with a rhesus monkey, 'Miss Sam,' aboard. Test objectives for this flight were the same as those for Little Joe 1 (LJ-1) in which the escape tower launched 31 minutes before the planned launch, and Little Joe 1-A (LJ-1A), wherein the dynamic build up in the abort manoeuvre was too low. A physiological study of the primate, particularly in areas applying to the effects of the rapid onset of reverse acceleration during abort at maximum dynamic pressure, was also made. In addition, the Mercury helicopter recovery system was exercised. During the mission, all sequences operated as planned; the spacecraft attained a peak altitude of 9.3 statute miles, a range of 11.7 statute miles, and a maximum speed of 2,021.6 miles per hour. Thirty minutes from launch time, a Marine recovery helicopter deposited the spacecraft and its occupant at Wallops Station. 'Miss Sam' was in good condition, and all test objectives were successfully fulfilled.

 

 

8.95

LJ-1B Miss Sam Returns To Wallops Island

10 x  8   Black & White Glossy Photograph

NASA  No.  B-60-778

21 January 1959

A Marine helicopter is seen carrying the Little Joe-1B spacecraft with the rhesus monkey, Miss Sam, still inside back to Wallops Island Station after a successful abort test mission.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

28 January 1960 - NASA's Ten-Year Plan presented to Congress:  In testimony before the House Committee on Science and Astronautics, Richard E. Horner, Associate Administrator of NASA, presented NASA's ten-year plan for 1960-1970. The essential elements had been recommended by the Research Steering Committee on Manned Space Flight. NASA's Office of Program Planning and Evaluation, headed by Homer J. Stewart, formalized the ten-year plan.

On February 19, NASA officials again presented the ten-year timetable to the House Committee. A lunar soft landing with a mobile vehicle had been added for 1965. On March 28, NASA Administrator T. Keith Glennan described the plan to the Senate Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences. He estimated the cost of the program to be more than $1 billion in Fiscal Year 1962 and at least $1.5 billion annually over the next five years, for a total cost of $12 to $15 billion.

10 - 11 February 1960 - NASA Space Exploration Council:  The first meeting of the NASA Space Exploration Council was held at NASA Headquarters. The objective of the Council was "to provide a mechanism for the timely and direct resolution of technical and managerial problems . . . common to all NASA Centres engaged in the space flight program."

 

31 January 1960 - Six chimpanzees ready for Mercury missions:  Six chimpanzees were rated as being trained and ready to support Mercury-Redstone or Mercury-Atlas missions. Other chimpanzees were being shipped from Africa to enter the animal training program.

March - April 1960 - Mercury-Atlas working panels:  The Mercury-Atlas working panels were reorganized into four groups: coordination, flight test, trajectory analysis, and change control. Each panel was composed of at least one representative from NASA (Space Task Group), McDonnell, Air Force Ballistic Missile Division, Space Technology Laboratory, and Convair-Astronautics.

16 March 1960 - The Space Task Group published recovery requirements for the Mercury-Atlas 1 (MA-1) flight test.

5 April 1960 - Preliminary specifications to modify the Mercury capsule by adding a re-entry control navigation system:  Preliminary specifications were issued by Space Task Group (STG) to modify the Mercury capsule by adding a re-entry control navigation system. The modified capsule would obtain a small lifting capability (lift-over-drag ratio would equal approximately 0.26). The self-contained capsule navigation system would consist of a stable platform, a digital computer, a possible star tracker, and the necessary associated electronic equipment. Dispersion from the predicted impact point would be less than 10 miles. The prospective development called for a prototype to be delivered to NASA for testing in February 1961; and first qualified system, or Modification I, to be delivered by August 1961; and the final qualified system, or Modification II, to be delivered by January 1962. STG anticipated that four navigational systems (not including prototype or qualification units) would be required.

 

 SOLD  For  8.95

SOLD

Mercury Beach Abort Test

Mercury Capsule #1

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

9 May 1960

NASA's Wallops Island, VA. Test Area.

Mercury spacecraft #1 and its Launch Escape System were fired from the ground level. The flight lasted 1-minute 16 seconds and reached an apogee of 2,465 feet (750 m) and a range of 0.6 mile (0.96 km). A Marine Corps helicopter recovered the spacecraft 17 minutes later. Top speed was a velocity of 976 mph (1,571 km/h). The test was considered a success, although there was insufficient separation distance when the tower jettisoned. Mercury spacecraft # 1, the first spacecraft off McDonnell's production line was used in this test. Payload 1,154 kg.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is very good condition. VG+

 

 

5 July 1960  - House recommends a high priority manned expedition to the moon:  The House Committee on Science and Astronautics declared: "A high priority program should be undertaken to place a manned expedition on the moon in this decade. A firm plan with this goal in view should be drawn up and submitted to the Congress by NASA. Such a plan, however, should be completely integrated with other goals, to minimize total costs. The modular concept deserves close study. Particular attention should be paid immediately to long lead-time phases of such a program." The Committee also recommended that development of the F-1 engine be expedited in expectation of the Nova launch vehicle, that there be more research on nuclear engines and less conventional engines before freezing the Nova concept, and that the Orion project be turned over to NASA. It was the view of the Committee that "NASA's 10-year program is a good program, as far as it goes, but it does not go far enough. Furthermore the space program is not being pushed with sufficient energy."

7 July 1960  -   Reporting plan for Mercury-Atlas and Mercury-Redstone missions:  A reporting plan for Mercury-Atlas and Mercury-Redstone missions was issued. This document was amended on February 17, 1961, and April 10, 1961.

 

4.95

The Atlas Family Of Space Vehicles

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  PL-60-56471

5 August 1960

The Atlas range of launch vehicles with a cut-away view of the Mercury Spacecraft. A full description of each is given on the back in the familiar purple mimeograph text.

This fine 1960 vintage glossy NASA photograph is in good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Standard Series Atlas D

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

1960

Outstanding detail given with the Mercury Atlas D on the left with the details of a ICBM on the right.

This fine 1960 vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Mercury Series Atlas D

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

1962

The Mercury Atlas-2 is used in this illustration pointing out the main aspects of the Mercury Spacecraft's ASIS Escape System.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Mercury Series Atlas D

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

1962

A fantastic concept by a General Dynamics Astronautics artist showing the separation of the Mercury Spacecraft and Atlas Launch Vehicle. The Atlas booster falls and burns up on its way back to Earth.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.95

Board Over Front Door At LC-14

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

1962

Board above the door at Launch Complex-14. Note that the MA-6 mission has been blocked off as the next to be added.

A outstanding view of the board above the front door with a view through the bunker looking out of the back door.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For   4.95

SOLD

Mercury Capsule Instrument Panel

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   B-60-794

1960

A rare view inside a Mercury Spacecraft looking at the Pilots Instrument Panel.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in poor to good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

MA-1 Convair Atlas 50-D

Mercury-Atlas 1 Booster Being Erected

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  B-60-1513

July 1960

A fantastic gantry view of the MA-1 Atlas Booster 50D being moved into position for erection at Launch Complex 14 in preparation for the special Project Mercury capsule re-entry test.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Mercury Capsule #4  MA-1 Mating

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  B-60-1514

July 1960

A fine gantry view of the Project Mercury capsule No. 4 being hoisted to the top of the gantry at Launch Complex 14 for mating with the MA-1 Atlas 50D Booster in preparation for a special capsule re-entry test.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  7.95

SOLD

Mercury-Atlas 1 Gantry Roll-Back

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  PL-60-56156

21 July 1960

A fine view of the MA-1 Atlas 50-D booster with Mercury spacecraft #4 mated as its payload. The gantry's work platforms have been raise in preparations for gantry roll-back during pre-launch activities at Launch Complex 14.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For   9.95

SOLD

Mercury-Atlas 1 Launch Preparations

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  G-60-2755

29 July 1960

The Mercury-Atlas 1 flight  was aimed at qualifying the spacecraft under maximum air-loads and after-body heating rate during re-entry conditions using Mercury spacecraft No.4. The test was unsuccessful because of a launch vehicle system malfunction.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Mercury-Atlas 1 Lift Off

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  PL-60-56271

29 July 1960

This R&D flight was aimed at qualifying the spacecraft under maximum air-loads and after-body heating rate during re-entry conditions using Mercury spacecraft No.4. The test was unsuccessful because of a launch vehicle system malfunction.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

29 July 1960  -   MA-1 Spacecraft Test mission:  MA-1 was launched from the Atlantic Missile Range in a test of spacecraft structural integrity under maximum heating conditions. After 58.5 seconds of flight, MA-1 exploded and the spacecraft was destroyed upon impact off-shore and only reached an apogee of 8 miles. None of the primary capsule test objectives were met. The mission objectives were to check the integrity of the spacecraft structure and after-body shingles for a re-entry associated with a critical abort and to evaluate the open-loop performance of the Atlas abort-sensing instrumentation system. The spacecraft contained no escape system and no test subject. Standard posigrade rockets were used to separate the spacecraft from the Atlas, but the retrorockets were dummies. The flight was terminated because of a launch vehicle and adapter structural failure. The spacecraft was destroyed upon impact with the water because the recovery system was not designed to actuate under the imposed flight conditions. Later most of the spacecraft, the booster engines, and the liquid oxygen vent valve were recovered from the ocean floor. Since none of the primary flight objectives was achieved, Mercury-Atlas 2 (MA-2) was planned to fulfil the mission.

August 1960 to February 1961 - Exhaustive review of Mercury-Atlas after dual Atlas failures:  Because of the failure of the Big Joe Atlas test flight and the Mercury-Atlas 1 (MA-1) flight to attain all its mission objectives, the overall Mercury-Atlas program underwent an exhaustive review.

 

 SOLD  For   8.95

SOLD

Mercury Spacecraft In-flight Separations

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   G-60-1950

1960 - The first printing 

Artist's conception of the separation of the Mercury spacecraft from the launch vehicle, showing the turnaround to orbital and re-entry position whth the blunt end of the spacecraft forward.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For   6.95

SOLD

Events During Powered Flight

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   63-MA9-54

10 May 1963

The orbital path achieved for the spacecraft by the Atlas will be the result of split-second programming of launch vehicle staging, velocity, pitch-over, yaw control and engine cut-off. The Atlas will accelerate continuously during its powered flight and must arrive at the insertion point travelling at a precise speed, completing its pitch-over to an Earth-referenced horizontal flight path at the same moment it reaches that orbital point.

Detailed Stats. on all of the above mentioned occurrences are listed on the back of the photo.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

Mercury Spacecraft Camera Placement

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

1961

A wonderful vintage concept showing the locations of the motion picture cameras (Data Acquisition) inside the Mercury Spacecraft.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in good condition. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.95

Mercury Capsule Communications Recovery

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

1961

A concept showing the 4 primary phases of communications after splashdown of a Mercury spacecraft.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  7.95

SOLD

Mercury-Scout 1 Satellite

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   61-M-Scout-4

29 October 1961

This is an artist conception of the Mercury-scout 1 satellite built to test Project Mercury's world-wide tracking network. The cigar-shaped vehicle contains transmitting and receiving equipment similar to that used in Mercury Spacecraft.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.95

Tracking Station T-3 At The Cape

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   PL-60-320138

14 November 1960

A view looking South West at Building T-3 at the Cape.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  6.95

SOLD

Titan 1 J-7 Re-Entry Vehicle Test

10  x  8  B/W  Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  PL-60-56607

10 August 1960

The Titan I J-7 is in the service gantry at Launch Complex 15 prior to lift off for this MK-4 Re-entry Vehicle Test mission. A film crew is seen in the foreground ready to capture the event on film.

The Titan I was built as back-up to the Atlas, using two stages instead of one and a half, and conventional tank construction in lieu of balloon tanks. It was also to have been used for sub-orbital tests of the X-20A Dynasoar manned space plane. For unknown reasons it was never refurbished for use as space launcher and scrapped after being replaced by the Titan II in the mid-1960's.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

12.95

Early Aerial View Of Launch Complex 5/6

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

1958

A fantastic over all view of Launch Complex 5/6 at the Cape. LC 5/6 was a Redstone and Jupiter launch complex.

Pad 5 supported its first Jupiter A launch on 19 July 1956. In addition to Redstone and Jupiter launches, the complex supported Explorer and Pioneer missions and all six Redstone /Mercury sub-orbital flights.

Pad 6 supported its first Redstone launch on 20 April 1955, three months before the complex was finally accepted by the U.S. Government.

In addition to Redstone and Jupiter launches, LC 5/6 supported Explorer and Pioneer missions and all six Redstone /Mercury sub-orbital flights.

On 31 January 1964, Complexes 5 and 6 were reassigned to become part of the USAF Space Museum.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.  VG+

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Mercury Redstone Monument At Pad-5

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   116-KSC-371-280/4

15 April 1971

A wonderful profile of the Mercury Redstone Monument poised at Launch Complex 5 as seen on 15 April 1971.

Pad 5 launched its first Jupiter A rocket on 19 July 1956. In addition to Redstone and Jupiter launches, the complex supported Explorer and Pioneer missions and all six Mercury-Redstone suborbital flights. On 31 January 1964, Complexes 5 and 6 were reassigned to become part of the USAF Space Museum and deactivated from any more launches.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Block House At Pad-5/6

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   116-KSC-371-280/8

15 April 1971

The familiar odd shaped Block House at Launch Complex 5/6 as seen on 15 April 1971.

Pad 5 launched its first Jupiter A rocket on 19 July 1956 and Pad 6 launched its first Redstone on 20 April 1955.

On 31 January 1964, Launch Complex 5/6 was reassigned to become part of the USAF Space Museum and deactivated from any more launches.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

12.95

Early Aerial View Of Launch Complex 11

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

1958

A outstanding overall view of Launch Complex 17 Pads A & B.  

LC-17 was a Delta launch complex that was a dual launch pad complex built for the Thor ballistic missile program in 1956. Upgraded over the decades for use with Thor, Delta, Delta II, and Delta III launch vehicles, it remained in use for over half a century.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.  VG+

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.95

Launch Complex 11

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

1958

A simple and easy to read over view of Launch Complex 11 listing all major aspects of the Launch Complex .

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

Launch Complex 17

The LC-17 dual launch pad complex was built for the Thor ballistic missile program in 1956. Pad 17A supported its first Thor launch on 30 August 1957. In addition to Thor missile launches, Complex 17 began supporting space launches in the late 1950s. The site was modified in the early 1960s to support a whole host of launch vehicles derived from the basic Thor booster. Thirty-five Delta missions were launched from Complex 17 between the beginning of 1960 and the end of 1965. Six ASSET (Aerothermodynamic/Elastic Structural Systems Environmental Test) launches were also conducted at Complex 17 between 18 September 1963 and 24 February 1965. The Air Force transferred Complex 17 to NASA in the spring of 1965, but the site was returned to the Air Force in October 1988 to support the Delta II program. In all, Complex 17 supported 274 major missile and space launches between January 1957 and the end of October 1998.

 

12.95

Early Aerial View Of Launch Complex 17

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

1958

A outstanding overall view of Launch Complex 17 Pads A & B.  

LC-17 was a Delta launch complex that was a dual launch pad complex built for the Thor ballistic missile program in 1956. Upgraded over the decades for use with Thor, Delta, Delta II, and Delta III launch vehicles, it remained in use for over half a century.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.  VG+

 

 

 

 

Launch Complex 26

The LC-26 dual launch pad complex was constructed for the U.S. Army's Redstone and Jupiter missile programs. Construction started in 1956, and both pads were occupied in May 1957. Pad 26A supported its first Jupiter launch on 28 August 1957. At least 36 Redstone, Jupiter, Jupiter C and Juno II launches were conducted from Complex 26 before the site was deactivated in 1964. On 20 November 1964, the complex was reassigned for development as the USAF Space Museum. Since 1966, the USAF Space Museum has been open to the public. The museum includes Complex 26's blockhouse, an exhibit hall and an outdoor display area featuring about 70 missile and space launch vehicles. Complex 26 was declared a national historic landmark in April 1984.

 

12.95

Early Aerial View Of Launch Complex 26

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

1958

A outstanding overall view of Launch Complex 26 Pads A & B. Redstone, Jupiter launch complex. The LC-26 dual launch pad complex was constructed for the U.S. Army's Redstone and Jupiter missile programs in 1956-1957. At least 36 Redstone, Jupiter, Jupiter C and Juno II launches were conducted between 1957 and 1964.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.  VG+

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For   8.95

SOLD

Block House At Launch Complex 26

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   116-KSC-68-168

1 February 1958

Block House activity for the during the Explorer 1 launch on 1 February 1958.

This very fine 1978 vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

This image was first reissued in 1968 for the 10th anniversary of the Explorer 1 launch and this photo was again reissued in 1978 for the 20th anniversary of the Explorer 1 mission. Classed as a vintage photo as it over 30 years old.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click Here To See All 36 Spacecraft #2 Vintage Glossy Photographs  

Special Mini Gallery

Mercury Redstone-1 Spacecraft #2 

August 1960

A wonderful series of 36 vintage NASA glossy photographs covering the MR-1 Spacecraft Check-Out in Hangar S at the Cape and the Test Mating of the Escape Tower System.

Click on the photo on the left to enter this gallery.

 

 

 

 

10.95

MR-1 Loxing On Pad 5

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

November 1960

The completed Mercury Redstone-1 (MR-1) booster with Mercury Spacecraft #2 stands tall on Pad 5 at the Cape.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  8.95

SOLD

MR-1 Loxing Activity At Pad 5

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   PL-60-58124

21 November 1960

A fine early morning view of the MR-1 Launch Vehicle with Mercury Capsule #2 in its gantry with liquid oxygen vapours steaming out as its fuelled for launch.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  9.95

SOLD

MR-1 Launch Attempt

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

21 November 1960

A wonderful view of the Mercury Redstone-1 as it attempts lift off. It made it 5 inches off the pad and settled back down and only the launch escape system was launched. As it did not lift off, the smoke and exhaust plumes up and surrounds the rocket. A sight rarely seen as most rockets leave the pad and exhaust behind.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

MR-l  Launch Attempt

21 November 1960  - An attempt was made to launch Mercury-Redstone 1 (MR-1) from the Cape:  This unmanned mission was unsuccessful because premature cut-off of the launch vehicle engines activated the emergency escape system when the vehicle was only about 1 inch off the pad. Engine cut-off was caused by premature loss of electrical ground power to the booster. The launch vehicle settled back on the pad with only slight damage. The engine cut off after 1 second and then fell back to the pad from a about 5 inches high but did not explode. This faulty ground-support circuitry had not been noted on some 60 previous Redstone firings. Since the spacecraft received a cut-off signal, the escape tower and recovery sequence was initiated and launched the escape tower but not the capsule. The undamaged spacecraft was recovered for reuse.

 

 

10.95

MR-1A  Stacked And Ready On Pad 5

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   PL60-1992

1960

The completed Mercury Redstone-1A (MR-1A) booster with Mercury Spacecraft #2 stands tall on Pad 5 at the Cape for a second attempt to launch.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Mercury Redstone-1A (MR-1A) Ignition

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   PL-60-90766.2

19 December 1960

NASA third attempt to attain the objectives of the Mercury Redstone booster and Spacecraft was finally successful. The primary objectives of the MR-1A flight were to qualify the spacecraft for space flight and to qualify the flight system for a primate flight.

Lift off from the Cape's LC 5 was at 16:15 GMT on 19 Dec. 1960.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 SOLD  For   9.95

SOLD

Mercury Redstone-1A (MR-1A) Lift Off

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   PL-60-90766.3

19 December 1960

After three attempts the Mercury Redstone-1 (now 1A) Lifts off from the Cape's Launch Complex-5 was at 16:15 GMT on 19 Dec. 1960.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

MR-l (A)   Launch 

19 December 1960  - Mercury-Redstone 1A (MR-1A) launched from the Cape:  Mercury-Redstone 1A (MR-1A) was launched from Cape Canaveral in a repeat of the November 21, 1960, mission and was completely successful. This was the third attempt to accomplish the objectives established for this flight. The first attempt on November 7, 1960, was cancelled as a result of a helium leak in the spacecraft reaction control system relief valve, and on November 21, 1960, the mission could not be completed because of premature cut-off of the launch vehicle engines. Objectives of the MR-1A flight were to qualify the spacecraft for space flight and to qualify the flight system for a primate flight scheduled shortly thereafter. Close attention was given to the spacecraft-launch vehicle combination as it went through the various flight sequences: powered flight; acceleration and deceleration; performance of the posigrade rockets; performance of the recovery system; performance of the launch, tracking, and recovery phases of the operation; other events of the flight including retrorocket operation in a space environment; and operation of instrumentation. Except that the launch vehicle cut-off velocity was slightly higher than normal, all flight sequences were satisfactory; tower separation, spacecraft separation, spacecraft turnaround, retrofire, retro-package jettison, and landing system operation occurred or were controlled as planned. The spacecraft reached a maximum altitude of 130.68 statute miles, a range of 234.8 statute miles, and a speed of 4,909.1 miles per hour. Fifteen minutes after landing in the Atlantic Ocean, the recovery helicopter picked up the spacecraft Mercury Capsule #2) to complete the successful flight mission.

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  16.95

SOLD

MR-2 Ham After Training

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   61-MR2-2

January 1961

Handlers from the Aeromedical Field Laboratory, Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico, release Ham from his flight couch after training for the MR-2 mission.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

16.95

MR-2 Redstone And Capsule No. 5

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  LOD 61-845

31 January 1961

Pre-launch activities at LC-5 for the Mercury Redstone-2 with Capsule #5 as its payload and Ham as its pilot.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

16.95

Mercury Redstone-2 Ready To Fly

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  LOD 61-847

31 January 1961

Pre-launch activities at LC-5 for the Mercury Redstone-2 with Capsule #5 as its payload and Ham as its pilot. The Service Tower has been rolled back, Ham is onboard and she is ready to fly.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  29.95

SOLD

MR-2 Lift Off

10 x  8  Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  LOD 61C-201

31 January 1961

MR-2 with Han, a 37-lb chimpanzee, onboard. Spacecraft-5 reached 155 statute miles altitude, landed 420 statute miles downrange and was recovered. During the landing phase the parachuting craft was drifting as it struck the water. Impact of the angled blow slammed the suspended heat shield against a bundle of potted wires, driving a bolt through the pressure bulkhead and causing the spacecraft to leak. Ham was rescued before the craft had taken on too much water.

This very fine vintage NASA colour glossy photograph is in near mint condition and printed on heavy 'A Kodak Paper'.

 

 

 

 

 

 

12.95

MR-2 Lift Off

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   61-MR2-14

31 January 1961

MR-2 with Han, a 37-lb chimpanzee, onboard. Spacecraft-5 reached 155 statute miles altitude, landed 420 statute miles downrange and was recovered. During the landing phase the parachuting craft was drifting as it struck the water. Impact of the angled blow slammed the suspended heat shield against a bundle of potted wires, driving a bolt through the pressure bulkhead and causing the spacecraft to leak. Ham was rescued before the craft had taken on too much water.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  26.95

SOLD

MR-2 In-Flight With Ham

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   61-MR2-32

31 January 1961

"Ham," the first chimpanzee to ride in space, is shown here during the 5000 mile per hour flight. This photograph was taken by an automatic 16 mm camera with a film exposure of four frames per second.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

MR-2 USS Donner On Its Way

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   61-MR2-24

31 January 1961

USS Donner moves full steam ahead for landing area of the Mercury Redstone 2 capsule. Helicopters aboard will take off as soon as they are in range. The USS Donner was the prime recovery ship in a group with two destroyers.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

12.95

MR-2 With Ham Onboard After Splashdown

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   61-MR2-27

31 January 1961

The Mercury-Redstone 2 capsule floats in the sea, 420 statue miles from the Cape. A Marine helicopter from the USS Donner airlifted it back to its flight deck. The chimpanzee Ham survived the 5,000 mile a hour flight in fine order.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

12.95

MR-2 And Ham During Recover Operations

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   61-MR2-22

31 January 1961

A Marine Helicopter has just picked up the Mercury-Redstone 2 capsule with Ham, our space hero, onboard after a 5,000 mile an hour ride down the Atlantic Missile Range. The capsule was placed aboard the USS Donner and the chimpanzee, "Ham" who was in very good health except for a bit of dehydration.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

12.95

MR-2 Ham Safely Onboard USS Donner

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  61-MR2-23

31 January 1961

The Marine helicopter sets Mercury Spacecraft #5 down gently on the deck of the USS Donner with our space Chimp Ham still inside. Our space Chimpanzee made the 5,000 mile an hour flight in very good order and was in excellent health after the historic mission.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  24.95

SOLD

MR-2 Ham Onboard USS Donner

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  LOD 61-1920

31 January 1961

Ham reaches out from his space couch to take an apple from a crewman of the USS Donner. This was the first food for the space Chimp following a 420 mile ride in his Mercury capsule launched by a Redstone rocket from the Cape.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

12.95

MR-2 Capsule Returns To The Cape

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   61-MR2-25

31 January 1961

A Marine Helicopter lowers the Mercury-Redstone 2 capsule on the landing strip at the Cape. Although there was slight capsule damage the chimpanzee, Ham made the 425 statute mile trip down range in safety and was returned in very good health.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  16.95

SOLD

MR-2 "Ham" During Press Conference

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.   PL-61-70589

3 February 1961

Mercury Redstone-2 astronaut "Ham" is sitting with his handler during a post flight press conference at the Cape. Ham is wearing his space suit and his special pressurized flight couch is in the background.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

31 January 1961 - MR-2 flight summary:  Apogee: 251 km (155 mi). Ham, a 37-pound chimpanzee, was aboard the spacecraft #5. The over-acceleration of the launch vehicle coupled with the velocity of the escape rocket caused the spacecraft to attain a higher altitude and a longer range than planned. In addition, the early depletion of the liquid oxygen caused a signal that separated the spacecraft from the launch vehicle a few seconds early. However spacecraft recovery was effected, although there were some leaks and the spacecraft was taking on water. Ham appeared to be in good physiological condition, but sometime later when he was shown the spacecraft and it was visually apparent that he had no further interest in cooperating with the space flight program. Despite the over-acceleration factor, the flight was considered to be successful and Ham live out his natural life happy and healthy.

 

 

 

8.95

Mercury Capsule #6 For Mercury-Atlas 2

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   PL-60-57178

7 September 1960

Mercury Capsule #6 is seen being moved from Hangar S to the H202 Room for testing..

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

MA-2 Capsule #6 Going Into H202 Room

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   PL-60-57179

7 September 1960

Mercury Capsule #6 is seen being moved into the H202 Room for testing.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

MA-2 Capsule #6 In H202 Room

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   PL-60-57185

7 September 1960

The H202 Service Trailer is seen in the foreground with MA-2 Capsule #6 in the background.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

MA-2 Capsule #6 During H202 Test

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   PL-60-57180

7 September 1960

Close up view of The MA-2 Capsule #6 during H202 testing.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.95

MA-2 Capsule #6 During H202 Test #2

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   PL-60-57181

7 September 1960

Close up view of The MA-2 Capsule #6 during H202 testing.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

20 September 1960  -  Mercury Atlas launch vehicle 67-D delivered to Cape Canaveral:  The Atlas launch vehicle 67-D was delivered to Cape Canaveral for the Mercury-Atlas 2 (MA-2) re-entry test mission.

26 September 1960 - Roll-out inspection of Mercury Atlas launch vehicle 77-D:  The roll-out inspection of Mercury Atlas launch vehicle 77-D was conducted at Convair-Astronautics. This launch vehicle was allocated for the Mercury-Atlas 3 (MA-3) mission, but was later cancelled and Atlas booster 100-D was used instead.

18 November 1960 - Mercury Spacecraft No. 8 delivered to Cape Canaveral:  Spacecraft No. 8 was delivered to Cape Canaveral for the Mercury-Atlas 3 (MA-3) unmanned orbital mission.

17 February 1961 - Space Task Group selected severe flight trajectory for Mercury-Atlas 2:  Information was released by NASA Headquarters that Space Task Group engineers directing Project Mercury had selected the flight trajectory for the Mercury-Atlas 2 (MA-2) mission.

 

 

 

8.95

Convair Mercury-Atlas 67-D (MA-2)

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   61-MA2-4

February 1961

Convair Atlas 67D launch vehicle is being calibrated in a horizontal position in preparation for launch. This MA-2 is one in a series of Mercury-Atlas shots in connection with the manned orbital flights. This  modified Atlas Booster will fly the Mercury Spacecraft #6 to check maximum heating and its effect during the worst re-entry conditions.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Mercury-Atlas II 67-D (MA-2) On LC-14

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   LOD 61-1429

20 February 1961

The Mercury Atlas Booster with Spacecraft #6 stands ready for launch for the MA-2 spacecraft check-out flight.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  SOLD  For   8.95

SOLD

Mercury-Atlas II (MA-2) Lift-Off

10 x  8   B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   PL-61-70865

21 February 1961

Lift off of the Mercury Atlas II 67D (MA-2) from Launch Complex 14 at the Cape with Mercury Capsule #6 on top as a payload.

MA-2 reached a peak altitude of 108 miles and the re-entry angle was higher than planned so heating was correspondingly greater than anticipated. It landed 1,425 miles downrange and reached a speed of about 13,000 mph. The test was noted as very successful.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

21.95

Mercury-Atlas 67-D Lift-Off

10  x  8   Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   PL-61-70865

21 February 1961

Lift off of the Mercury Atlas II 67D (MA-2) from Launch Complex 14 at the Cape with Mercury Capsule #6 as a payload.

Mercury-Atlas 2 (MA-2) was launched from Cape Canaveral in a test to check maximum heating and its effects during the worst re-entry design conditions. The flight closely matched the desired trajectory and attained a maximum altitude of 114.04 statute miles and a range of 1,431.6 statute miles. Inspection of the spacecraft aboard the recovery ship some 55 minutes after launch (actual flight time was 17.56 minutes) indicated that test objectives were met, since the structure and heat protection elements appeared to be in excellent condition. The flight control team obtained satisfactory data; and the complete launch computing and display system, operating for the first time in a flight, performed satisfactorily.

This very fine vintage colour glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  17.95

SOLD

MA-2 Clears The Tower

10 x  8   Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   S-61-1226

21 February 1961

Lift off of the Mercury Atlas II 67D (MA-2) from Launch Complex 14 at the Cape with Mercury Capsule #6 as its payload.

This fine vintage colour glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition and printed on heavy 'A Kodak Paper'.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Mercury-Atlas MA-2 Spacecraft #6

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   61-MA2-9

21 February 1961

Project Mercury spacecraft #6 is being lowered onto a moving trailer at the downrange island site, after a successful launch by the Convair Atlas 67D Launch Vehicle. This production version of the spacecraft is similar to the one designed to place a man in orbit. 

MA-2 reached a peak altitude of 108 miles and the re-entry angle was higher than planned so heating was correspondingly greater than anticipated. It landed 1,425 miles downrange and reached a speed of about 13,000 mph. The test was noted as very successful.

This fine vintage black and white NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

24 February 1961  -  Mercury Spacecraft No. 9 was delivered to Cape Canaveral:   Spacecraft No. 9 was delivered to Cape Canaveral for the Mercury-Atlas 5 (MA-5) orbital primate (Enos) mission.

3 March 1961 - Mercury Atlas launch vehicle No. 100-D rolled out:   Factory roll-out inspection of Atlas launch vehicle No. 100-D was conducted at Convair-Astronautics. This launch vehicle was allocated for the Mercury-Atlas 3 (MA-3) mission.

14 March 1961 - Mercury Atlas launch vehicle 100-D delivered to Cape Canaveral:  Atlas launch vehicle 100-D was delivered to Cape Canaveral for the Mercury-Atlas 3 (MA-3) mission.

21 March 1961 - The Mercury-Atlas Missile Range Projects Office designated as a staff function:  The Mercury-Atlas Missile Range Projects Office, headed by Elmer H. Buller, was designated as a staff function of the Space Task Group Director's office.

 

 SOLD  For   8.95  

SOLD

MR-DB Spacecraft In White Room

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   LOD 61-083-056

23 March 1961

Mercury Spacecraft #3 is seen in the White Room mated to the Mercury-Redstone configuration high atop the service structure at Launch Complex 5 at the Cape. 

After booster problems on the Mercury MR-2 chimp test flight, Von Braun insisted on a further unmanned booster test flight, against the wishes of Shepard and others at NASA. This Mercury boilerplate capsule was launched on a flawless test on 24 March. If NASA had overruled Von Braun, the manned Freedom 7 capsule would have flown instead. Shepard would have been the first man in space (though not in orbit), beating Gagarin's flight by three weeks.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For   8.95

SOLD

Mercury Redstone MR-DB Spacecraft No. 3

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   LOD 61-2855

24 March 1961

Mercury Spacecraft and escape system is seen on top of the Mercury-Redstone combination ready for its test flight. The spacecraft #3 was a recovered craft that was used on a previous unsuccessful Little Joe flight (LJ-5).

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition. VG+

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For   8.95

SOLD

Mercury Redstone MR-DB Lift Off

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   LOD 61-2852

24 March 1961

NASA launched a project Mercury-Redstone Booster at 12:30 p.m. on 24 March 1961 (MR-DB). Atop the Redstone Booster was a model spacecraft containing no operation systems or instrumentation and was included only to provide proper weight and aerodynamic factors for the flight. The flight was devoted exclusively to proving modifications incorporated in the Launch Vehicle as a result of earlier Mercury-Redstone flights. There will be no recovery of the Booster or the model spacecraft.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For   9.95

SOLD

Mercury Atlas-3 Lift Off

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   LOD 61-4117

25 April 1961

Convair Mercury Atlas 100D Launch Vehicle lifts off from Launch Complex 14 at the Cape with Mercury Spacecraft #8 as a payload and noted as MercuryAtlas-3. MA-3 was an attempt to orbit the spacecraft with a 'mechanical astronaut' aboard. After lift-off, the launch vehicle failed to roll to a 70 degree heading and to pitch over into the proper trajectory. The abort-sensing system activated the escape rockets prior to the launch vehicle's destruction by the range safety officer after approximately 40 seconds of flight that had attained an altitude of 16,400 feet. The spacecraft then coasted up to 24,000 feet, deployed its parachutes, and landed in the Atlantic Ocean 2,000 yards north of the launch pad. The spacecraft was recovered and was found to have incurred only superficial damage; it was then shipped to McDonnell for refitting for the MA-4 mission.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

11 May 1961  -  Mercury spacecraft 8A delivered to Cape Canaveral Nation:   Mercury spacecraft 8A was delivered to Cape Canaveral for the Mercury-Atlas 4 (MA-4) orbital unmanned (mechanical astronaut) mission.

17 May 1961 -  Mercury MA-3 investigation board Nation:   An Atlas investigation board was convened to study the cause of the Mercury-Atlas 3 (MA-3) mission launch vehicle failure. Several possible areas were considered, and three were isolated as probable causes based on a review of test data.

29 May 1961 - Centrifuge training for Mercury-Atlas orbital missions:   A 30 day centrifuge training program was conducted at the Aviation Medical Acceleration Laboratory directed entirely toward training the astronauts for the Mercury-Atlas orbital missions.

1 June 1961 - Pre-launch mission rules for Mercury-Atlas 4 (MA-4) were published.

8 June 1961 - Mercury-Atlas 4 (MA-4) recovery requirements were published.

29-30 June 1961 - Mercury Atlas vehicle 88-D roll-out:  Factory roll-out inspection of Atlas launch vehicle 88-D, designated for the Mercury-Atlas 4 (MA-4) mission, was conducted at Convair.

15 July 1961 - Mercury Atlas launch vehicle 88-D delivered to Cape Canaveral:  Atlas launch vehicle 88-D was delivered to Cape Canaveral for the Mercury-Atlas 4 (MA-4) mission.

9 August 1961 - Retrofire-from-orbit mission rules for Mercury MA-4:  Retrofire-from-orbit mission rules were published for the unmanned Mercury-Atlas 4 (MA-4) orbital flight.

9 August 1961 - Key personnel operational assignments for the Mercury MA-4:   Key personnel operational assignments for the Mercury-Atlas 4 (MA-4) unmanned orbital mission were made by the Space Task Group.

 

9.95

MA-4 Loxing On Launch Complex 14

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   61-MA4-12

13 September 1961

The Mercury Atlas-4 launch vehicle on Launch Complex  14 loxing before Launch.

The unmanned Mercury Spacecraft #8A sits on top of the Atlas #88-D booster with the umbilical cord attached and minutes later it boosted the spacecraft to an altitude of around 99 miles at a speed of 17,520 MPH. This was the first successful orbit of a Mercury Spacecraft on 13 September 1961 at 9:04 a.m. EST.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Mercury Atlas-4 Ready To Launch

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   61-MA4-17

13 September 1961

The Mercury Atlas-4  #88-D launch vehicle stands ready at Launch Complex  14 with the Mercury Spacecraft #8A onboard for the start of the MA-4 mission.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Mercury Atlas-4 Lift Off

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   61-MA4-10

13 September 1961

The Mercury Atlas-4 booster was launched from the Cape's LC-14 at 9:04 a.m. on 13 September 1961 with Mercury Spacecraft #8A as a payload.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For   14.95

14.95

Mercury Atlas-4 88D Lift Off

10 x  8  Colour Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   LOD 61C-1496

13 September 1961

The Mercury Atlas-4 booster #88D was launched from the Cape's LC-14 at 9:04 a.m. on 13 September 1961 with Mercury Spacecraft #8A as a payload.

This fine vintage NASA colour glossy photograph in good condition and printed on 'A Kodak Paper'.

It has a couple very slight gloss issues (dull spots) that can only be seen using reflective light. The over all fabric of the photo is very good with no flaws noted.

 

 

13 September 1961  -  Mercury-Atlas 4 (MA-4) was launched from Cape Canaveral with special vibration and noise instrumentation and a mechanical crewman simulator aboard in addition to the normal spacecraft equipment. This was the first Mercury spacecraft to attain an earth orbit. The orbital apogee was 123 nautical miles and the perigee was 86 nautical miles. After one orbit, the spacecraft's orbital timing device triggered the retrograde rockets, and the spacecraft splashed in the Atlantic Ocean 161 miles east of Bermuda. Recovery was made by the USS Decatur. During the flight, only three slight deviations were noted - a small leak in the oxygen system; loss of voice contact over Australia; and the failure of an inverter in the environmental control system. Overall, the flight was highly successful: the Atlas booster performed well and demonstrated that it was ready for the manned flight, the spacecraft systems operated well, and the Mercury global tracking network and telemetry operated in an excellent manner and was ready to support manned orbital flight.

 

8.95

Mercury Atlas (MA-4) Spacecraft #8A

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   61-MA4-17

13 September 1961

Men aboard the USS Decatur inspect the US first Mercury spacecraft to orbit the earth. The USS Decatur recovered the Mercury Atlas 4 spacecraft 166 miles east of Bermuda. Elapsed time from lift-off to recovery was 3 hours and 10 minutes. A simulated man aboard rode at a speed of 17,519 miles per hour at maximum altitude of 158.6 miles.

This fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

18 September 1961  -  Mission rules for the Mercury-Atlas 5 (MA-5) orbital flight:   Mission rules for the Mercury-Atlas 5 (MA-5) orbital flight were published. Revisions were issued on October 16 and 25, 1961, and November 11, 1961.

1 October 1961 - Factory roll-out inspection of Mercury Atlas booster No. 93-D:  Factory roll-out inspection of Atlas booster No. 93-D was conducted at Convair. This booster was designated for the Mercury-Atlas 5 (MA-5) mission.

9 October 1961 - Mercury Atlas booster No. 93-D delivered to Cape Canaveral:  Atlas booster No. 93-D was delivered to Cape Canaveral for the Mercury-Atlas 5 (MA-5) orbital flight mission.

 

10.95

Mercury Atlas-5 Arrives At Pad 14

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.  61-MA5-7

9 October 1961

The Convair Atlas 93D noted as the Mercury Atlas-5 is seen being delivered to Pad 14 for erection and mating with Mercury Spacecraft #9. This research and development flight will be launched in a orbital trajectory along the Mercury tracking network with Enos, the chimp, as its pilot. During the third orbit the retrorockets will be fired and re-entry will be initiated and the impact and recovery area is 800 miles south west of the Cape.

This very fine vintage NASA glossy photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.95

Mercury Atlas-5 Erecting At Pad 14

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   S-61-4473

November 1961

The Atlas 93D noted as the Mercury Atlas-5 is seen being lifted into the gantry at Launch Complex 14. The MA-5 mission will have Enos the Chimp as the pilot.

This very crisp and clear vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.95

Mercury Atlas-5 In Gantry At Pad 14

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   S-61-4472

November 1961

Just moments after the above photograph was taken, we now see the MA-5 booster in the Gantry and will be made ready for the mating of spacecraft #9.

A very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph in near mint condition.

 

 

12 November 1961 - Mercury 5 launch postponed:   Mercury-Atlas 5, scheduled for launch no earlier than November 14, ran into technical difficulties, postponing launch for several days.

29 November 1961 - Mercury-Atlas 5 (MA-5):  Mercury-Atlas 5, the second and final orbital qualification of the spacecraft prior to manned flight was launched from Cape Canaveral with Enos, a 37.5 pound chimpanzee, aboard. Scheduled for three orbits, the spacecraft was returned to earth after two orbits due to the failure of a roll reaction jet and to the overheating of an inverter in the electrical system. Both of these difficulties could have been corrected had an astronaut been aboard. The spacecraft was recovered 255 miles southeast of Bermuda by the USS Stormes. During the flight, the chimpanzee performed psychomotor duties and upon recovery was found to be in excellent physical condition. The flight was termed highly successful and the Mercury spacecraft well qualified to support manned orbital flight.

 

 

8.95

MA-5 Planned 3 Orbit Map

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  61-MA5-1

12 November 1961

World map showing the three planned earth orbits of the Mercury-Atlas 5 mission, plus the eighteen Mercury ground stations around the world known as the Mercury Tracking Network.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.95

MA-5 EES And Orbital Flight Plan

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  61-MA5-2

12 November 1961

Top View - Artist conception of the Mercury-Atlas 5 Emergency Escape System (EES).

Bottom View - The orbital flight path of the Mercury-Atlas 5 showing visually the sequence of events on launch and recovery of the spacecraft.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in good condition. G-

 

 

 

 

 

 

15.95

MA-5 Flight Preparations

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  61-MA5-3

November 1961

Technicians preparing a primate in one of the many simulated flight preparation weeks before launch day, to familiarize the chimpanzee with the flight couch. These primates are trained to perform simple psycho-meter tasks to evaluate stresses imposed by acceleration and deceleration as well as effects of prolonged weightlessness.

The Mercury-Atlas 5 flight animal will be confined in a pressure-tight container as shown with a window dome. He will wear the equivalent of the pressure suit worn by an astronaut.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

MA-5 Enos Training

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  61-MA5-6

12 November 1961

Enos and his handler technician relax during the week of training prior to the orbital spacecraft flight. During the flight Enos will have simple psycho-meter tasks of depressing levers. Each problem will call for two of the displays being identical, the third odd. Enos will respond correctly by depressing the lever under the odd symbol. When he does, he will be rewarded with a banana-flavoured wafer, the size of an aspirin, being the 100 percent reward response. 5 cc of water will also be offered through a device resembling the nipple of a baby bottle. Improper selection of a lever will result in a mild electrical shock administered through the animal's left shoe.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

MA-5 Pilot Enos Selected

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  61-MA5-10

12 November 1961

Enos, the 5 1/2 year old chimpanzee that was selected for the MA-5 three orbital flight mission.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  10.95

SOLD

MA-5 Pilot Enos After Training

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  S-61-4542

November 1961

Enos, the 5 1/2 year old chimpanzee that was selected for the MA-5 three orbital flight mission is seen here with one of his handler after a training session.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

MA-5 Pilot Enos Selected #2

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  S-61-4543

12 November 1961

Enos, the 5 1/2 year old chimpanzee that was selected for the MA-5 three orbital flight mission.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  SOLD  For  14.95

SOLD

MA-5 Enos Fitted In Flight Couch

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  61-MA5-19

29 November 1961

Enos, the 5 1/2 year old chimpanzee, is fitted into his pressure couch prior to the three-orbital flight from the Cape. Weighting 37.5 pounds and measuring 38 inches in height, the male chimpanzee was selected from among a group of five animals which had been trained for NASA's Project Mercury MA-5 mission.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

MA-5 Enos Fitted In Flight Couch  #2

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  61-MA5-20

29 November 1961

Enos, the 5 1/2 year old chimpanzee, is fitted into his pressure couch prior to the three-orbital flight from the Cape. Weighting 37.5 pounds and measuring 38 inches in height, the male chimpanzee was selected from among a group of five animals which had been trained for NASA's Project Mercury MA-5 mission.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

MA-5 Pilot Enos In His Space Couch

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  S-61-4398

29 November 1961

Enos, the 5 1/2 year old chimpanzee, is fitted into his pressure couch prior to the three-orbital flight from the Cape. Weighting 37.5 pounds and measuring 38 inches in height, the male chimpanzee was selected from among a group of five animals which had been trained for NASA's Project Mercury MA-5 mission.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  8.95

SOLD

MA-5 Chimp Enos In Pressure Couch

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

29 November 1961

Enos the 5 1/2 year old Chimp being transferred in his pressure couch to Pad 14 where he will be inserted in the waiting Mercury Atlas 5 spacecraft #9 for the 3 earth orbit attempt.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For   12.95

SOLD

MA-5 And Chimp Enos Lift Off

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  61-MA5-11

29 November 1961

Enos the 5-1/2 year old Chimp inside Mercury Spacecraft #9 atop the Atlas booster lifted off from the Cape at 10:07 a.m. EST. This flight was to qualify the Mercury Spacecraft and all its systems during orbit and re-entry. The Spacecraft and Enos splashed down safely around 1000 miles southeast of the Cape after a two-orbit flight. Scheduled for three orbits, the spacecraft was returned to earth after two orbits due to the failure of a roll reaction jet and to the overheating of an inverter in the electrical system.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA  photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  SOLD  For  11.95

SOLD

MA-5 And Chimp Enos Lift Off

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  S-61-8310

29 November 1961

Enos the 5 1/2 year old Chimp inside Mercury Spacecraft #9 atop the Atlas booster lifted off from the Cape at 10:07 a.m. EST. This flight was to qualify the Mercury Spacecraft and all its systems during orbit and re-entry. The Spacecraft and Enos splashed down safely around 1000 miles southeast of the Cape after a two-orbit flight. Scheduled for three orbits, the spacecraft was returned to earth after two orbits due to the failure of a roll reaction jet and to the overheating of an inverter in the electrical system.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  15.95

SOLD

MA-5 Has Cleared The Tower

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  61-MA5-18

29 November 1961

Enos the 5-1/2 year old Chimp inside Mercury Spacecraft #9 atop the Atlas booster lifted off from the Cape at 10:07 a.m. EST. This flight was to qualify the Mercury Spacecraft and all its systems during orbit and re-entry. The Spacecraft and Enos splashed down safely around 1000 miles southeast of the Cape after a two-orbit flight. Scheduled for three orbits, the spacecraft was returned to earth after two orbits due to the failure of a roll reaction jet and to the overheating of an inverter in the electrical system.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA  photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For  16.95

SOLD

MA-5 Over West Coast Of Mexico

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  No.  61-MA5-21

29 November 1961

The West coast of Mexico as seen by Enos from his Mercury Atlas-5 spacecraft during the first orbit one hour and 21 minutes after lift-off. During the flight the spacecraft reached an apogee of 147.5 statute miles and a perigee of 99.6 statute miles.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

12.95

MA-5 Recovery Of Enos

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   61-MA5-27

29 November 1961

The Mercury Atlas-5 spacecraft is being hoisted to the deck of the USS Stormes. The chimpanzee Enos in the spacecraft landed 220 nautical miles south of Bermuda after orbiting the Earth two times.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SOLD  For   11.95

SOLD

MA-5 Post Recovery Of Enos

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   LOD 61C-1719

29 November 1961

Post recovery activity as Enos's couch is being removed from spacecraft no. 9 after his successful Earth orbit space flight. Enos a 37.5 lb. chimpanzee came through the flight completely unharmed.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOLD

MA-5 Enos Safely Onboard USS Stormes

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   61-MA5-28

29 November 1961

Enos lies in his couch aboard the USS Stormes after his two orbits of the Earth. Enos performed all assigned tasks essentially as programmed and returned in good health.

Please have a look in my Mercury Testing Reissue Gallery for more MA-5 and Enos the chimp photographs.

This very fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in near mint condition.

 

 

 

29 November 1962 - Glenn selected for the first Mercury manned orbital flight:  Astronaut John Glenn was selected as the pilot for the first Mercury manned orbital flight, with Scott Carpenter as backup pilot. Immediately, training was started to ready these two astronauts for the mission. The five remaining astronauts concentrated their efforts on various engineering and operational groups of the Manned Spacecraft Centre in preparation for the mission.

30 November 1962 - Mercury Atlas launch vehicle 109-D delivered to the Cape:  Atlas launch vehicle 109-D was delivered to Cape Canaveral for the Mercury-Atlas 6 (MA-6) first manned orbital mission.

15 - 17 January 1962 - Recovery swimmers trained for Mercury MA-6:  Recovery area swimmers were trained at the Pensacola Naval Air Station, Florida, for use in the Mercury-Atlas 6 (MA-6) manned orbital mission. Instruction included films, briefings, auxiliary flotation collar deployment, and jumps from a helicopter.

 

 

8.95

New Mercury Spacecraft Floatation Collar

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA  NO.   62-MA6-22

21 January 1962

Seen is a Mercury spacecraft during a new recovery demonstration is hoisted from the water by a crane aboard the recovery ship. A new floatation collar attached  has given the capability of keeping the capsule afloat for hours. This new recovery aid will be employed for the first time on the MA-6 mission with John Glenn as the pilot.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Mercury Spacecraft No. 10 Check Out

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  S-63-3396

20 March 1963

A modified production model of Mercury Spacecraft #10 is rolled into a vacuum chamber at MSC's Crew Systems Division to test and evaluate its environmental control systems (ECS). The ECS is the life-sustaining atmosphere within the spacecraft that keeps the earth-orbiting astronaut alive and alert. Although the chamber cannot simulate the lack of gravity for weightlessness, it can evacuate air pressure to a level so low that, for all practical purposes, it is the environment of space. Heating pads encircling the spacecraft simulate solar heating in orbit.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.95

Space Suit Mobility Tests

10 x  8  B/W Glossy NASA Photograph

NASA No.  S-63-3397

20 March 1963

Space-suited Joseph J. Kosmo of the Manned Spacecraft Centre's Crew Systems Division responds to 'Cockpit Inputs' from Richard Sandridge, one of the series of tests which will help to evaluate the suit for mobility under operating conditions. The specially built testing and evaluating device consists of an operator's console, a physlograph and a moulded couch facing a subject's testing board. It will be used to set standards for the development of MSC space suits.

This fine vintage glossy NASA photograph is in very good condition, near mint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you for viewing - I will be adding more Vintage Mercury Testing photographs soon.

 

Let me know what you think !

Leave A Comment In My Guestbook

View My Guestbook

 

Click here to return to get back HOME

HOME

 

 

Click here to return to the Main Gallery Home Page

Back To Main Gallery

 

Click here to return to  Mercury Home Page

Back to Mercury Home Page

 

 Visa Mastercard Switch Solo Visa Delta Visa Electron

 

  Posting & Packing Buttons

Only One P&P Charge Per Order