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£4.99

Apollo 17 Prime Crew Composition

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA   72-HC-896

1972

A composite photo of the Apollo 17 mission emblem, the Saturn V space vehicle on the launch pad, and prime crew.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Prime Crew

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA

10 October 1972

These three astronauts are the prime crewmen of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission. They are Eugene A. Cernan (right), commander; Ronald E. Evans (left), command module pilot, and Harrison H. Schmitt, (middle) lunar module pilot. They are photographed with a Lunar Roving Vehicle trainer. Cernan and Schmitt will use an LRV during their exploration of the Taurus-Littrow landing site. The Apollo 17 Saturn V stack is in the background. This picture was taken at Pad A, Launch Complex 39, at the Cape.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Prime Crew  #2

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA  KSC-72PC-436

10 October 1972

These three astronauts are the prime crewmen of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission. They are Eugene A. Cernan (sistting), commander; Ronald E. Evans (right), command module pilot, and Harrison H. Schmitt, (left) lunar module pilot. They are photographed with a Lunar Roving Vehicle trainer. Cernan and Schmitt will use an LRV during their exploration of the Taurus-Littrow landing site. The Apollo 17 Saturn V stack is in the background. This picture was taken at Pad A, Launch Complex 39, at the Cape.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Commander Eugene A. Cernan

10  x  8  Black & White Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA  72-H-250

6 March 1972

The Apollo 17 Commander, Gene Cernan, undergoes final flight suit fit check of the Apollo 7-L spacesuit at the ILC Industries Inc. plant at Dover, Delaware.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Schmitt Spacesuit Checks

10  x  8  Black & White Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA  72-H-305

13 March 1972

Apollo 17 Lunar Module Pilot, Harrison Schmitt, undergoes final flight fit checkout and integration of the Apollo 7-L spacesuit at ILC Industries, Inc. plant at Dover, Delaware.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Evans Spacesuit Checks

10  x  8  B/W Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA  72-H-297

13 March 1972

The Apollo 17 Command Module Pilot, Ron Evans, undergoes final flight fit checkout and integration of the Apollo 7-L spacesuit at ILC Industries, Inc. plant at Dover, Delaware.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Command Module

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA  KSC-72C-1084

30 March 1972

Apollo 17 Command Module being moved for mating with the CSM 114 adapter stage and Docking Test with the Lunar Module.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

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Apollo 17 Saturn V Roll Out

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA   KSC-72PC-447

28 August 1972

A interesting view of the Apollo 17 Saturn V as it was rolled out of the VAB to Pad 39A at the Cape.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Saturn V At Night

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA   S-72-54813

6 December 1972   or   21 November 1972

The caption for this photo supplied by NASA indicates that this photo was taken on 6 December 1972, a few hours before launch. On that night, the Moon was actually a crescent Moon and, if the date is right, the full moon was added - for artistic effect - by double exposure or some other technique. This photo was shot from the east looking west so by all accounts this was taken the two weeks previously in the early hours of that morning. The Moon was not added for effect but is real and only the NASA description and date is wrong. It should be 21 November 1972 when the Moon was full.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Saturn V At Dusk

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA

21 November 1972

The Apollo 17 Saturn V on Pad 39-A at dusk.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

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Apollo 17 Saturn V At Dusk  #2

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA   KSC-72PC-589

21 November 1972

The Apollo 17 Saturn V on Pad 39-A at dusk.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Saturn V And Moon

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA   KSC-72C-5901

21 November 1972

The Apollo 17 Saturn V on Pad 39-A with the Moon overhead.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

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Apollo 17 Lift Off

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA   S-72-55070

7 December 1972

Lift-off of the Apollo 17 Saturn V Moon Rocket from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Centre, Florida, at 12:33 a.m., December 7, 1972. Apollo 17, the final lunar landing mission and was the first night launch of a Saturn V.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Lift Off  #2

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA

7 December 1972

Lift-off of the Apollo 17 Saturn V Moon Rocket from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Centre, Florida, at 12:33 a.m., December 7, 1972. Apollo 17, the final lunar landing mission and was the first night launch of a Saturn V.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Lift Off  #3

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA S-72-55482

7 December 1972

Lift-off of the Apollo 17 Saturn V Moon Rocket from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Centre, Florida, at 12:33 a.m., December 7, 1972. Apollo 17, the final lunar landing mission and was the first night launch of a Saturn V.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Onboard With Gene Cernan

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA  AS17-162-24035

8 - 10 December 1972

Gene Cernan seen during the trans-lunar coast to the Moon.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Docked LM / CSM Earthrise

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA  AS17-151-23188

10 December 1972

Earthrise beyond the LM as seen from the docked Command Module. This picture was taken during the 3rd lunar orbit while the LM and CSM were still docked together.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 CSM Seen From The LM

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA  AS17-147-22451

10 December 1972

Gene Cernan snapped this fantastic shot of the CSM from the Lunar Module just after undocking and before he and Jack Schmitt headed for the lunar surface during the 12th revolution of the Moon.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 CSM Seen From The LM   #2

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA  AS17-147-22456

10 December 1972

Gene Cernan snapped this fantastic shot of the CSM from the Lunar Module before heading for the lunar surface during the 12th revolution of the Moon.

The CSM is just west of the crater Becvar as seen below the spacecraft.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 LM Seen From The CSM

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA  AS17-147-22451

10 December 1972

Ron Evans snapped this shot of the LM from the CSM just after undocking and before it headed for the lunar surface during the 12th orbit of the Moon.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

EVA-1  -  11 December 1972

 

 

£4.99

Cernan At The Back Of The LRV

10  x  8  B/W Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA   AS17-136-20760

11 December 1972

A fantastic Station 1 shot of Gene Cernan at the back of the Rover. This excellent picture shows the high-gain antenna, the TV camera, and the dust-brush at the front of the Rover. Just forward of the seats, you can see the low-gain antenna, the traverse maps clipped to the accessory staff, and, sticking out toward the front of the vehicle, Jack Schmitt's LRV Sampler. Behind the seats, you can see the dark-appearing seismic charges on the transporter pallet, the SEP receiver antenna, the rake, the scoop and, near Gene's right hand, the Traverse Gravimeter. 

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Jack Schmitt TV EVA

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA

11 December 1972

Jack Schmitt is seen holding his lunar scoop sample taker in this reproduction from a motion picture frame taken by the TV camera on the LRV. His face plate visor is up and you can clearly see his face. This photo gives a good idea of how much head-room the astronauts have within their helmets.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

EVA-2  -  12 December 1972

 

 

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Apollo 17 Cernan In The LRV

10  x  8  B/W Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA   AS17-135-20544

12 December 1972

This photo shows Gene Cernan sitting in the left seat of the LRV as it heads North from the SEP site at the start of EVA-2. A wonderful crisp photo as you can see Gene's PLSS and OPS very clearly. The SEP transmitter is to the right of the Rover and the North Massif is in the background. Note the long track made on the face of the mountain by a large boulder above the rear of the LRV.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 LRV At Station 2

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA  AS17-137-20976

12 December 1972

The LRV is parked at Station 2 early into EVA-2. This shot give a very good idea of the scale of the boulders and other aspects of the lunar surface like the small craters. They don't seem to be all that small.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

EVA-3  -  13 December 1972

 

 

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Apollo 17 The Earth In Jack's Visor

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA  AS17-140-21386

13 December 1972

You can actually see the Earthrise above the South Massif in the reflection from Jack Schmitt's visor in this most wonderful pose taken early into EVA-3.

The detail is a must see in this very sharp and clear photograph.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Cernan In LRV At SEP Site

10  x  8  B/W Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA   AS17-141-21512

13 December 1972

Gene Cernan is sitting in the Rover waiting for Jack Schmitt to finish taking documentation photos of the LRV's position at the start of the traverse at the SEP site early into EVA-3. The LM is seen in the background.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Cernan Getting The TGE

10  x  8  B/W Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA   AS17-141-21598

13 December 1972

Another fantastic Station 6 view with Cernan getting the Traverse Gravimeter (TGE) from back of the LRV. You can see the edge of Tracy's Rock, the huge bolder at Station 6, on the far left.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Cernan Taking A Photo

10  x  8  B/W Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA   AS17-142-21811

13 December 1972

Schmitt snaps this shot of Gene Cernan taking a panorama series of photos at Station 9 during EVA-3. A fine view that give a good idea of size on the lunar surface. How small Gene looks set against the lunar terrain.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

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Apollo 17 Schmitt In LRV At Station 9

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA   S17-134-20453

13 December 1972

Scientist-astronaut Harrison (Jack) Schmitt is photographed seated in the Lunar Roving Vehicle at Station 9 where Van Serg Crater is found during the third Apollo 17EVA at the Taurus-Littrow landing site.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 LM LRV Flag And Cernan

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA   S17-134-20506

13 December 1972

A wonderful shot of the landing site taken by Jack Schmitt on his way back to the LM from the ALSEP site at the end of EVA-3. The U.S. flag is to the left (north) of the LM and Gene Cernan can be seen in the distance working around the Rover at the VIP site just left of the LM.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

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Apollo 17 Cernan And The LM Plaque

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA   AS17-134-20482

13 December 1972

Gene Cernan is taking the cover off the LM Plaque. One of the many things to do during close-out before leaving the Moon for the very last time.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

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Apollo 17 Jack Schmitt And Earthrise

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA   AS17-134-20471

13 December 1972

Jack Schmitt with his visor up and the Earth above his head taken at the end of EVA-3.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

The Last Photo Of A Man On The Moon

10  x  8  B/W Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA   AS17-134-21941

13 December 1972

Other than the photos made from the motion picture TV camera on the LRV of Jack and Gene getting in the LM for the last time, this shot of Jack Schmitt is the last proper photograph taken of a astronaut on the lunar surface.

Jack is seen watching his hammer land after he threw it into the air - where it lands he does not care. The astronauts joked about making the smallest crater on the Moon, Hammer-crater.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

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Apollo 17 The Last LRV

10  x  8  B/W Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA   AS17-143-1933

13 December 1972

The Apollo 17 Lunar Module is seen in the background in this fine view of the last LRV where is is still parked today. Too bad this photo was not taken with colour film as the detail is fantastic.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Gene Cernan After EVA-3

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA   AS17-134-20522-25

13 December 1972

A wonderful composition by Ed Hengeveld of photos AS17-134-20522 and AS17-134-20525 showing a relaxed Gene Cernan and he and Jack's helmets after the last lunar EVA (EVA-3). NASA started having the commanders helmet with a red strip as they could then tell who was who in the photographs after they were developed. Al Shepard of Apollo 14 was the first Apollo commander to have the red strip during a lunar EVA.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Jack Schmitt After EVA-3

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA   AS17-134-20530

13 December 1972

A smiling Lunar Module Pilot, Jack Schmitt, as he and his commander Gene Cernan prepare the ascent stage for leaving the lunar surface after three days on the Moon.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Challenger Ignition

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA   S-72-55423

14 December 1972

Ignition of the Apollo 17 Lunar Module "Challenger" ascent stage as its engines fire to leaves the Taurus-Littrow landing site. Its spectacular lift-off from the lunar surface, as seen in this reproduction taken from a colour television transmission made by the colour RCA TV camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle. The LRV-mounted TV camera, remotely controlled from the Mission Control Center in Houston, made it possible for people on Earth to watch this fantastic event. The LM lift-off was at 188:01:36 ground elapsed time, 4:54:36 p.m. (CST), Thursday, Dec. 14, 1972.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Challenger Lift-Off

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA   S-72-55421

14 December 1972

The Apollo 17 Lunar Module "Challenger" ascent stage leaves the Taurus-Littrow landing site as it makes its spectacular lift-off from the lunar surface, as seen in this reproduction taken from a colour television transmission made by the colour RCA TV camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle. The LRV-mounted TV camera, remotely controlled from the Mission Control Center in Houston, made it possible for people on Earth to watch the fantastic event. The LM lift-off was at 188:01:36 ground elapsed time, 4:54:36 p.m. (CST), Thursday, Dec. 14, 1972.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 CSM During Rendezvous

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA  AS17-145-22261

14 December 1972

The Apollo 17 Command & Service Module photographed from the Lunar Module at rendezvous. CSM orbit #52 with the Crater Taruntius A below.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

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Apollo 17 CSM In Lunar Orbit

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA  No.   AS17-145-22252

14 December 1972

A view of the Apollo 17 command and service modules photographed from the lunar module (LM) Challenger during rendezvous and docking manoeuvres in lunar orbit. The LM ascent stage, with astronauts Eugene A. Cernan and Harrison H. Schmitt aboard, had just returned from the Taurus-Littrow landing site on the lunar surface. Note the exposed Scientific Instrument Module (SIM) bay in sector 1 of the service module. Three experiments are carried in the bay: S-209 lunar sounder, S-171 infrared scanning spectrometer, and the S-169 far-ultraviolet spectrometer. Also mounted in the SIM bay are the panoramic camera, mapping camera and laser altimeter used in service module photographic tasks. A portion of the LM is on the right.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

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Apollo 17 Onboard With Cernan & Schmitt

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA   AS17-163-24148

December 1972

Astronaut Gene Cernan (left) and scientist-astronaut Harrison "Jack" Schmitt are photographed by the third crew man aboard the Apollo 17 spacecraft during their fall back to Earth.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Onboard With Evans & Schmitt

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:   NASA   AS17-163-24143

December 1972

Astronaut Ronald Evans (left) and scientist-astronaut Harrison "Jack" Schmitt are photographed by the third crew man aboard the Apollo 17 spacecraft during their fall back to Earth.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Ron Evans Transearth EVA

10  x  8  Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA  No   AS17-152-23391

17 December 1972

Ron Evans is photographed performing extravehicular activity during the Apollo 17 spacecraft's transearth coast. During his EVA Command Module pilot Evans retrieved film cassettes from the Lunar Sounder, Mapping Camera, and Panoramic Camera. The cylindrical object at Evans left side is the mapping camera cassette. The total time for the transearth EVA was one hour seven minutes 19 seconds on Sunday, December 17, 1972. Note the red strip on his helmet, he used Gene Cernan's for his venture outside the spacecraft.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

£4.99

Apollo 17 Cernan After Splashdown

10  x  8  B/W Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA   72-H-1570

19 December 1972

Eugene A. Cernan is helped out of the Command Module by a Navy diver after splashdown.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enlargements

 

 

10 x 15  Colour Glossy Photograph        £9.99            Cernan After EVA-3

A wonderful composition by Ed Hengeveld of photos AS17-134-20522 and AS17-134-20525 showing a relaxed Gene Cernan and he and Jack's helmets after the last lunar EVA (EVA-3). NASA started having the commanders helmet with a red strip as they could then tell who was who in the photographs after they were developed. Al Shepard of Apollo 14 was the first Apollo commander to have the red strip during a lunar EVA.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 x 15  Colour Glossy Photograph        £9.99            Schmitt Pan No. 1

Jack is reaching down to open the solar panels on the SEP transmitter. Because of the stiffness of the suit, Jack can only reach this low by putting his right leg back and leaning to the side.

Gene Cernan's Shadow and LRV dominates the right foreground.

A brilliant over all view of the Taurus-Littrow landing site with the LM shown clearly in the background

And A full view of the Massif. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 x 15  Black & White  Glossy Photograph        £9.99            Schmitt Pan No. 2

Scientist-Astronaut Harrison Schmitt, Apollo 17 lunar module pilot, with his adjustable sampling scoop, heads for a selected rock on the lunar surface to retrieve the sample for study. The action was photographed by Apollo 17 crew commander, Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan on the mission's second extravehicular activity (EVA-2), at Station 5 (Camelot Crater) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site.

The Lunar Rover is seen in the distance and Schmitt looks as if he is heading back to it. This is a fantastic panoramic view of Station 5.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 x 15  Colour Glossy Photograph        £9.99            Schmitt Pan No. 3

An extraordinary lunar panorama at Station 4 (Shorty Crater) showing Geologist-Astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt working at the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) during the second Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA-2) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. 

This is the area where Schmitt first spotted the orange soil. Shorty Crater is to the right. The peak in the centre background is Family Mountain. A portion of South Massif is on the horizon at the left edge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 x 15  Colour Glossy Photograph        £9.99            Schmitt Pan No. 4

To the left shows astronaut Harrison (Jack) H. Schmitt on his way back to the Lunar Rover (right side) walking back around Tracy’s Rock.  On the right the East Massif dominates the horizon and is a prominent feature all the way to the valley floor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£7.99

Apollo 17 Schmitt & U.S. Flag Points Toward Earth

10 x 10 Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA  No.  AS17-134-10384

13 December 1972

Geologist-Astronaut Harrison Schmitt, Apollo 17 Lunar Module pilot, is photographed next to the American Flag during extravehicular activity (EVA) of NASA's final lunar landing mission in the Apollo series. The photo was taken at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. The highest part of the flag appears to point toward our planet earth in the distant background.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

Order a 12 x 12 Enlargement

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Apollo 17 Cernan & U.S. Flag

10 x 10 Colour Glossy Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA  No.  AS17-134-20387

13 December 1972

A fantastic photo of Gene Cernan with the Earth clearly seen above him. Note the antenna on the top of his OPS and the OPS activation ring mounted on the right side of his chest-mounted RCU. Gene is holding the lower corner of the American flag and note the checklist on the top of his glove, and the watch strapped on his arm just above the top of his glove. This shot was taken early during the first EVA of there mission.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

Order a 12 x 12 Enlargement

Only  £14.95

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you for viewing and I will be adding more Apollo 17 Glossy Reprints soon.

 

 

 

Please:  e-mail   me if you have any questions or special requests.

 

 

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