Apollo  13 Glossy Reprints

Apollo 13 Mission Patch

10x8 Glossy Reprint  4.99

Last update 20 August 2004

 

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October 10, 1969

Two views of Apollo 13's Lunar Module 7 being moved from the altitude chamber to the low bay stand for pre flight work at MSOB.

 

 

 

 

 

November 1969

The third stage adapter for the Apollo 13 spacecraft 109 is lowered into place over the Lunar Module LM-7 during stacking of the Saturn SA-508 in the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Centre.

 

 

 

 

 

December 16, 1969

Apollo 13 night view at Kennedy Space Centre. The Saturn V leaving the VAB during roll-out. 

An outstanding black & white photo

 

 

 

 

 

Apollo 13 night view at Kennedy Space Centre during roll-out. The  Saturn V  Rocket is seen by floodlights early on 

December 16, 1969

 

 

 

 

  Apollo 13 Command and Service Module and Escape Tower at Kennedy Space Centre as seen from the Mobile Service Structure.

 

 

 

 

 

January 28, 1970

Jim Lovell and Fred Haise beside LM landing leg during EVA training.

 

 

 

 

 

January 28, 1970

Fred Haise with lunar camera during EVA training.

 

 

 

 

 

10 x 12

March 24, 1970

Outstanding view of the Apollo 13 Saturn V stack as seen from the Mobile Service Structure during a Countdown Demonstration Test at Pad A Launch Complex 39.

 

 

 

 

 

10 x 12

April 10, 1970

The Mobile Service Structure pullback and Apollo 13 at dusk on pad 39A the day before the launch.

 

 

 

 

  Overall view of the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Centre at the Manned Spacecraft Centre, during the fourth television transmission from the Apollo 13 spacecraft while en-route to the Moon. Eugene F. Kranz (foreground, back to camera), one of four Apollo 13 Flight Directors, views the large screen at front of MOCR. Astronaut Fred W. Haise Jr., lunar module pilot, is seen on the screen. The fourth television transmission from the Apollo 13 mission was on the evening of April 13, 1970. Shortly after the transmission ended and during a routine procedure that required the crew to flip a switch that stirred one of the cryogenic liquid oxygen tanks, an explosion occurred that ended any hope of a lunar landing and jeopardized the lives of the three crew members.

 

 

 

 

  Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr., commander of the Apollo 13 mission, is pictured at his position in the Lunar Module.

 

 

 

 

  This view of a near full Moon was photographed from the Apollo 13 spacecraft during its transearth journey homeward. Though the explosion of the oxygen tank in the Service Module forced the cancellation of the scheduled lunar landing, Apollo 13 made a pass around the Moon prior to returning to Earth. Some of the conspicuous lunar features include the Sea of Crisis, the Sea of Fertility, the Sea of Tranquillity, the Sea of Serenity, The Sea of Nector, the Sea of Vapors, the Border Sea, Smyth's Sea, the crater Langenus, and the crater Tsiolkovsky.

 

 

 

 

 

This bright-rayed crater on the lunar far side was photographed from the Apollo 13 spacecraft during its pass around the Moon. This area is northeast of Mare Marginus. The bright-rayed crater is located at about 105 degrees east longitude and 45 degrees north latitude. The crater Joliot-Curie is located between Mare Marginus and the rayed crater. This view is looking generally toward the northeast.

 

 

 

 

  An oblique view of the International Astronomical Union Crater No. 302 on the lunar far side as photographed from the Apollo 13 spacecraft during its pass around the Moon.

 

 

 

 

  This view of the damaged Apollo 13 Service Module (SM) was photographed from the Lunar Module/Command Module following SM jettisoning. As seen here, an entire SM panel was blown away by the apparent explosion of oxygen tank number two located in Sector 4 of the SM. Two of the three fuel cells are visible just forward (above) the heavily damaged area. Three fuel cells, two oxygen tanks, and two hydrogen tanks are located in Sector 4. The damaged area is located above the S-Band high gain antenna. Nearest the camera is the Service Propulsion System (SPS) engine and nozzle. The damage to the SM caused the Apollo 13 crewmen to use the Lunar Module (LM) as a "lifeboat." The Lunar Module "Aquarius" was jettisoned just prior to Earth re-entry by the Command Module "Odyssey".

 

 

 

 

  Astronaut John L. Swigert, Jr., Apollo 13 Command Module Pilot, holds the "mailbox" a jerry-rigged arrangement which the Apollo 13 astronauts built to use the Command Module lithium hydroxide canisters to purge carbon dioxide from the Lunar Module. Lithium hydroxide is used to scrub CO2 from the spacecraft atmosphere. Since there was a limited amount of lithium hydroxide in the Lunar Module, this arrangement was rigged up using the canisters from the Command Module. The "mailbox" was designed and tested on the ground at the Manned Spacecraft Centre before it was suggested to the problem-plagued Apollo 13 crewmen. Because of the explosion of an oxygen tank in the Service Module, the three astronauts had to use the Lunar Module as a "lifeboat."

 

 

 

 

  An interior view of the Apollo 13 Lunar Module and the "mailbox."

 

 

 

 

  This view of the Apollo 13 Lunar Module (LM) was photographed from the Command Module (CM) just after the LM had been jettisoned. The jettisoning occurred a few minutes after 11 a.m., April 17, 1970, just over an hour prior to splashdown of the CM in the South Pacific Ocean.

 

 

 

 

  This view of the damaged Apollo 13 Service Module (SM), with the Moon in the distant background, was photographed from the Lunar Module/Command Module following SM jettisoning. The Command Module (CM), still docked with the Lunar Module (LM), is in the foreground. An entire panel on the SM was blown away by the apparent explosion of oxygen tank number two located in Sector 4 of the SM. Three fuel cells, two oxygen tanks, and two hydrogen tanks are located in Sector 4. The damaged area is forward (above) the S-band high gain antenna.

 

 

 

 

 

4.99

Apollo 13 Recovery Operations

10  x  8  B/W Glossy Reprint Photograph

Photo Credit:  NASA No.  S-70-35614

17 April 1970

Apollo 13 crew arrive on prime recovery ship U.S.S. Iwo Jima following splashdown and recovery operations in the South Pacific. Exiting the helicopter which made the pick-up some four miles from the Iwo Jima are (from left) Astronauts Fred W. Haise Jr., lunar module pilot; James A. Lovell Jr., commander; and John L. Swigert Jr., command module pilot. The Apollo 13 spacecraft splashed down at 12:07:44 p.m., April 17, 1970.

High gloss photograph chemically developed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you for viewing and I will be adding more Apollo 13 Glossy Reprints soon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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